Unique Cars

Price Range
Recently Listed
Seller Location
Radius (km)
Find Dealers
Seller Location
Radius (km)
Dealer Name or Keywords

Unique Cars For Sale from $250,000 to $500,000 in northgate

Trade Safely. Use our anti-scam guide to protect yourself.

12 result(s)
Sort by

show

results

  • RefCode: TA1205011
  • Body Type: Targa
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,995

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale one of the ten factory right hand drive Lamborghini Silhouettes. Of these ten cars, six were delivered to Australia, three were delivered to the UK and one to Cyprus. According to the factory records, this car was completed on the 19th January 1978. It is an Australian delivered, factory right hand drive example that was delivered through Tony De Fina, the importer at the time. The car was delivered new in rosso (red) with a nero (black) interior. The early history of this car is not definitively known, however, its first or second owner was then Sydney based medical entrepreneur and socialite Dr Geoffrey Edelsten. In the late 1970s and 1980s Edelsten owned a fleet of exotic cars including Porsches, Ferraris, Rolls-Royces, De Tomasos (who can forget his hot pink De Tomaso Pantera GT5 with a mink interior!) and a number of Lamborghinis. The Lamborghinis included a gold (later red) Countach LP400 periscopio, a green later black Countach LP400S and this Silhouette. Edelsten owned this Silhouette for a few years. When the car had an engine failure he decided to sell it. Its next owner rebuilt the engine and repainted the car wine red metallic. Unfortunately, the car was damaged shortly thereafter and subsequently sold to the prior to current owner circa 35 years ago. He intended to return it to its original colour and gave it to Henry Nehrybecki who at the time was the Lamborghini service agent in Sydney, NSW. Unfortunately, life got in the way and progress was extremely slow. The car sat around for many years. Nehrybecki later closed his business and the car was moved to another restoration shop who did very little with the car. In 2015 the car was sent to All Classic Car Restorations in Brookvale (Sydney) and the restoration was finally underway. The car was painted by McCreath Prestige Panel & Paint in Brookvale. This car has been missing for many years and in Lamborghini circles it was thought it had either been written off, gone overseas, or was squirrelled away in someones garage. Thankfully it was the latter! The current owner acquired this car through Oldtimer Australia in 2019. At that time the odometer read 18,947km. The car had been sparingly used prior to his purchase and he had Lamborghini specialist Imaant go through the car and complete a number of miscellaneous repairs, including suspension, steering, electrical and regas the air conditioning. Generally the paint on the car is still in good condition and from say a metre, it presents exceptionally well. On closer inspection there are some imperfections visible, most noticeably on the right front guard, the right rear guard and around the right front headlight. The unique targa roof is in very good condition and it fits very well. All the external trim, including the badges, bumpers, lights, lenses and the glass and are in good condition. A feature on the Lamborghini Silhouette is the Bravo style Campagnolo wheels which were also used on the first 50 Lamborghini Countach LP400S. The magnesium wheels are extremely porous and as a result they are prone to blistering. On this car they are in excellent condition having been completely refurbished in September 2019. The car is currently running the correct Pirelli Cinturato P7 tyres, 205/50 R15 at the front and 285/40/R15 at the rear. These tyres were fitted when the wheels were refurbished and are still in excellent condition, they are date stamped 4219 (week 42, 2019). Inside the cabin everything has been refurbished and presents really well. Purists will note the steering wheel and pedals are not original. Also, the dash and centre console have been refurbished in leather rather than alcantara. When the current owner acquired the car, it was fitted with Silhouette reproduction seats built by Henry Nehrybecki. He found them uncomfortable and has fitted modern brand new Recaro seats. The Silhouette reproduction seats will accompany the car. Lamborghinis 3.0 litre V8 engine makes one of the best noises you will ever hear. This Silhouette is no exception. Like all Lamborghinis the Weber carburettors require plenty of fuel to start the engine. One tends to get a little impatient waiting for the fuel pumps to do their thing . . . then bang the engine bursts into life with a growl! It is best to allow a little time for the engine to warm up and then youre away. Similarly, the gearbox gets better mile after mile as everything warms up. The engine has loads of power on tap and it pulls like a train. The gearbox is also good and it changes up and down smoothly. This car is a real pleasure to drive and we have to say the Recaro seats are super comfortable. The car handles, steers and stops as you would expect. Accompanying the car is an original owners manual, parts manual (copy), engine workshop manual (copy) and a thick file of receipts dating back to 2004. The Lamborghini Urraco/Silhouette is one of Bertones finest designs and we think one of the best-looking cars ever built. And oh did we mention the noise . . . the little V8 is in our opinion one of the best sounding engines ever . . . what a great combination! These cars are extremely rare and have been a well kept secret for many years, but no more! Today the Lamborghini Silhouette is highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts alike. Truly a unique opportunity. Today the odometer reads 21,621 km which is sure to be genuine. Highlights: - One of the rarest Lamborghinis, being one of 54 cars built and one of only ten factory right hand drive examples. - Australian delivered. - Finished in its stunning and original colour combination of rosso (red) with a nero (black) interior. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $349,950. Background: The Lamborghini story is fascinating in itself, but for the company to have survived all these years and indeed celebrate its 50th Anniversary in 2013 is quite amazing. Ferruccio Lamborghini was an entrepreneur, a very successful businessman and a lover of the finer things in life, including sports cars. He was fortunate enough to own some wonderful cars including Ferraris however, he found fault with them all. According to the legend following a meeting with Enzo Ferrari to discuss some of the short comings of his cars Enzo dismissed Ferruccio and he subsequently decided that he could build a better car. Not long after, in May 1963, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SPA was established and the small town of SantAgata Bolognese, located between Modena and Bologna, was chosen as the location to build the factory. Born under the Zodiac sign Taurus Lamborghini chose the raging bull as the emblem for his sports cars. Lamborghini knew what he wanted and he put together a highly skilled team. His first car the 350 GTV was shown at the Turin Motor Show in October 1963. This car received mixed reviews; however, Lamborghini was not deterred and made a number of improvements and design changes to the original concept. The first Lamborghini production car the 350 GT left the factory in mid-1964. The 350 GT evolved into the 400 GT 2+2 and later the Islero. In parallel to building these classic front engine V12 GT cars Lamborghini wanted to build a super car, enter the Miura first shown as a rolling chassis in 1965, and also a GT car that could comfortably seat four people, enter the Espada in 1968. The mid to late sixties were good times for Lamborghini and his cars were revered the world over. In 1970 the Islero was replaced by the Jarama. Lamborghini also wanted to enter the junior supercar market and introduced the Urraco or little bull, named for the fighting bull which killed the toreador Manoleten, at the 1970 Turin Motor Show. The Urraco attracted huge interest from the motoring world and Bertones classic wedge shape received critical acclaim at the time. It wasnt until some two years later, in 1972, that the first production cars rolled off the Sant Agata production line. Lamborghini hoped to build the Urraco in big numbers, however, this never eventuated and only 520 of the P250s were built up until 1975 when the P300 was released. The world economy changed quickly and the early 1970s were a tough time for Lamborghini. Additionally, the Urraco had some teething problems early on and the car unfortunately developed a reputation as unreliable. This was perhaps unfair as once Lamborghini ironed out the bugs the car was in fact a little gem and properly sorted was a genuine threat to Ferraris 308, Maseratis Merak and the Porsche 911 of the day. The Urraco P300 was indeed a fabulous little car and in Sports Car World magazine July September 1976 Mel Nichols wrote: . . . I was not hard pressed to conclude that the Urraco 3-litre is the most enjoyable car I have ever driven. In the October 1978 issue of Car Magazine Nichols pits the Lamborghini Urracoagainst a Ferrari 308 GTB and a Maserati Merak SS. The article is compelling reading and Nichols picks the Urraco as his favourite. Only 205 Urraco P300s were built. Lamborghini also built 66 Urraco P200s (with a 2 litre V8 engine) specifically for the Italian market. The Lamborghini Silhouette was a further development of the Urraco and it was first shown at the 1976 Geneva Motor Show. The Silhouette was a genuine 2 seater and the 2+2 seating of the Urraco was removed to allow space behind the seats to store the targa top. The Silhouette is one of the rarest Lamborghinis with only 54 cars built, of which only ten were factory right hand drive. Lamborghinis last iteration of their V8 engined junior supercar was the Jalpa (pronounced YAWL-pa), named after another breed of fighting bull. The Jalpa was introduced at the 1981 Geneva show and 410 examples were built from 1982 through until 1988.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1209902
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,582

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale an absolutely delightful, Australian delivered, factory right hand drive 1959 Porsche 356 A 1600. There is a letter on file from Porsche, Germany dated 5th July 1990 confirming this car was manufactured in June 1959 and delivered new through Porsche dealer Hamilton in Australia. The car was delivered with the following specifications: colour: orange (paint code 711), interior: vinyl, optional equipment: green tinted windscreen, right hand drive, hub caps with badge, US bumpers and moldings. We can confirm that this car retains its original matching numbers engine. The early history of this car is not known. The story starts in 1983, when on the 26th August, ownership of this car transferred from Chris Katos to Andrew McRitchie. There is also a note on file confirming McRitchie purchased the car for the sum of $3,500. At that time the car was carrying the Victorian registration HEA111 but it was sold unregistered with the note it required extensive renovation. McRitchie decided to restore the car and what followed was an 8 year journey. Importantly, he meticulously documented everything he did. There is a 35 page document on file showing exactly what he did, when he did it and the number of hours he spend doing it! There is also a thick file of receipts. The project started in May 1984 and it was finally finished in October 1992. In total he spend 3,910 hours restoring his Porsche and as the document states, this didnt include the hours spend by brothers, sisters, father, friends, the paint shop, the machine shop and the time spend on collecting the necessary replacement parts! We have seen many good history files but rarely do we come across a write up as detailed as this. McRitchie was obviously a very detail minded, dedicated and meticulous owner. There is a Vic Roads Certificate of Roadworthiness on file, dated 7th March 1993, at which time the odometer read 45,922 miles. In December 2006 the current owner acquired the car from McRitchie. At that time the odometer read 49,521 miles. There is a valuation report on file from a week after he purchased the car which states: Vehicle fully restored from ground up, on inspection many restoration photos of the vehicle sighted also, Michelin 165×15 tyres, drivers side mirror, vehicle immaculate condition throughout. The previous owner had clearly cherished his car after he completed the restoration. The current owner is a real Porsche enthusiast and he has thoroughly enjoyed his 17+ years of ownership of this fabulous 356. He has used the car, travelling just over 22,000 miles in his ownership. The way the car presents today you would think it has travelled only 2,200 miles in his ownership! Today the odometer reads 68,861 miles. The car has been maintained and regularly serviced by well known and respected classic Porsche specialist McKernan Restoration in Kippa-Ring, Queensland. During one of these services it was noted that the split case gearbox in the car was in very poor condition and in November 2012 the decision was made to replace it with a period correct gearbox from a slightly later model 356A. To make the 356 more reliable and easier to start a electric fuel pump was fitted in January 2015. In September 2020 the carburettors were overhauled. The most recent service was executed in October 2023 and at that time the odometer read 68,030 miles. Today this car still presents exceptionally well. It has hard to believe that the restoration was completed some 30 years ago. The car is a credit to its current and previous owner, but particularly to the quality of the restoration. When you first see the car you are immediately charmed by its colour. The blue is truly striking and it really suits the car. It also contrasts perfectly with the tan interior. The paint on the car is generally in a very good condition. This car has been used as its makers intended by both its current and previous owner and as a result there is some light wear and tear evident. There are some stone chips and very small paint imperfections here and there, but you have to look. The glass on the car is all in excellent condition with no evidence of any cracks, though there are a few very small chips on the windscreen. All the external trim, including the lights and lenses are in good condition. The painted steel wheels are generally in good condition. There are a few small chips here and there and one or two marks that look to be from balancing weights that were previously fitted. The wheels are shod with Vredestein Sprint Classic tyres, size 165HR15, date stamped 0116 (week 1, 2016). The tyres are still in a good condition. Open the door and you are presented with a minimalistic, yet very good looking interior. First impressions are good. The seats present well with no cracks or tears in the leather. In the back you find two small seats which appear to have hardly been used, if at all, since the restoration. The door cards present well and even the carpets are in very good condition. The dashboard also presents well. In Australia, the top of the dashboard often gets affected by the harsh sun, but that is not the case here. All the instruments are crisp and clean. The engine bay presents well. It is neat, clean and tidy. The same can be said for the boot, where you will find the rubber mat, spare wheel and jack. Sliding in behind the wheel is like putting on your favourite old leather jacket. It just feels right! The seats are comfortable and still provide ample support. Everything you see is basic, yet that is exactly how you expect it to be. The steering wheel is in excellent condition and is a real feature on these cars. Once comfortable behind the wheel you ready to go. The starting procedure is simple. This car is fitted with an aftermarket fuel pump and a battery isolator. Switch both on, insert the key into the ignition and turn the ignition on. After allowing the fuel pump a little bit of time to fill the carburettor, turn the key further to start the car. This car still runs its original six volt electrical system and as a result you might think your battery is low on voltage when you crank the engine. However, that is normal and the engine starts easily, even from cold, and the car quickly settles into a smooth idle with that typical air cooled engine sound. After allowing the engine to warm up, select first gear and away you go! We were curious to see if this Porsche 356 would drive as good as it looks. Would we be disappointed? The short answer is no . . . it drives superbly! The engine sounds great and it pulls willingly through the rev range. The car just wants to go! The gearbox feels tight and the gear changes are precise and direct. The car feels solid on the road, the steering feels direct and the brakes pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. We did notice that the speedo waves a bit every now and then, especially when you accelerate from low speed. However, once you are at cruising speed it settles and indicates the correct speed. The oil temperature gauge is not working. This is a very well sorted Porsche 356 A that is just a lot of fun to drive. This is the type of car you can just get in, use and enjoy. There are a few small things one can do to further improve the car but nothing that requires immediate attention. Accompanying the car is a very good history file, including a detailed restoration dossier, some photographs, a Porsche letter confirming the cars provenance, a spare wheel and a jack. Highlights: - Australian delivered, factory RHD 356 A. - An older but high quality, meticulous restoration. - Great colour combination. - Matching numbers, engine and chassis. - Very well presented car, ready to use and enjoy. Price $259,950. Background: The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 aluminium bodied cars by hand in their small factory at Gmündbefore relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany in 1949. Instead of building the body of the car himself Porsche decided to collaborate with an old partner, the body manufacturing company Reutter who had both the expertise and infrastructure to mass produce the bodies for the 356 coupe and cabriolet. Nowadays, the first series of the 356, built from 1948 through until 1955 are known as the 356 Pre A. In 1955 the 356 A was introduced. The internal factory designation for this model was Type 1 which was quickly adapted by enthusiasts who referred to the 356 A as the T1. The 356 A became available as a coupe, cabriolet and a Speedster. Buyers had the choice between a 1,300cc and a 1,600cc engine and later the Super version. A second revision of the 356 A was introduced early in 1957. It became known as the Type 2 (or T2). Late 1958 the Speedster was replaced by the Convertible D which was now build by coachbuilder Drauz. Late 1959 the 356 A was replaced by the 356 B. The 356 remained in production through until 1965 and evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1208384
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,341

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this fantastic 1983 Aston Martin V8 Oscar India. The Heritage certificate on file confirms this car was built on the 7th September 1983 and it left the factory on 11th October 1983. The car was originally delivered in storm red (paint code 9017) with a fawn pipe burgundy interior (trim code VM.3234/DV6171), a colour scheme the car still carries today. The car retains its original matching numbers engine. The Heritage Certificate also states this car was delivered with Weber carburettors, Avon tyres, beige with burgundy edged carpet, beige leather headliner and a miles per hour speedometer. This car is a highly desirable later model Oscar India with the V580 Series engine and BBS wheels. It also has the blanked out radiator grill that was standard on the Aston Martin V8 Vantage. Like the majority of the Aston Martin V8s built, this car is equipped with a Chrysler Torqueflite three speed automatic transmission. The documentation on file confirms that this Aston Martin was delivered through Victor Wilson Limited in Edinburgh, Scotland to its first owner, Mr M Carney from Glasgow, Scotland. It was first registered as MAT 78. Around 1989 the car was sold to Mr M Blackall, an Englishman temporary living and working in Belgium as the Area Director of Operations for a major hotel group. At that time the car was registered as A946FSF. The car spent the next two years in Belgium before the owner moved back to the UK and took the car with him. In 1993 he upgraded to an Aston Martin V8 Volante and this car was sold to Mr M Walker from Edinburgh in June 1994. In September 1996 the car was advertised for sale by the Murray Motor Company in Edinburgh and sold to Mr R Forrester from Cairneyhill, a small village just north of Edinburgh. In 2000 the Murray Motor Company advertised the car for sale again and subsequently sold it to Mr Keenan from Apperley, Gloucestershire, UK. The car was registered with the registration A4 SFK. These UK plates are still fitted on the car. The current owner, who has an extensive and eclectic collection of cars, acquired this Aston Martin in the UK in mid 2006 and subsequently imported it into Australia. There is an Import Approval on file dated 31st July 2006. Shortly after arriving into Australia the car was repainted in its original colour of storm red. The car has not been driven any distance since arriving in Australia and it has been in static storage for some fifteen years. It was last started about five years ago and today the engine turns over easily. Today the odometer reads 69,688 miles, which based on the information on file, is genuine. Even though the car carries what is now considered an older repaint, the paint still presents very well. As a result of the car not being driven since it was repainted, the paint has never been exposed to the harsh Australian sun. It retains a deep gloss and a strong depth of colour. There are only two small defects in the paint. There are two very small chips on the boot lid and there is also a small scrape on the edge of the drivers door. Subsequent to our photo shoot, these defects have been touched up using original touch up paint supplied with the car. All the glass, which looks to be original, and external trim is in very good condition. The same can be said for the bumpers and the other bright work on the car. It is all in very good to excellent condition. The BBS wheels, which are a real feature on these later Aston Martin V8s present like new with no curb rash. They are shod with Avon Turbosteel 70 tyres, size 235/70/15. The thread on the tyres still present like new, however they are date stamped 4400 (week 44, 2000), and should really be replaced on age. Open the door and you feel like you are stepping back in time. The interior has been beautifully preserved and is in beautiful condition. It is also very English! The fawn leather seats are in excellent condition with no cracks or tears in the leather. They are comfortable and still provide plenty of support. The rear seats appear to have hardly been used. All the carpets are in excellent condition. The dashboard presents like new. The timber veneer inserts are in excellent condition as is all the leather. Even the top of the dash is still in excellent condition. The instruments are all clean and present well. There is a row of push switches on the centre console and you often see these with faded text. Not in this car. The text is as clear as it was on the day the car left the factory. In the boot everything is clean and tidy and there is an original spare wheel present. Open the bonnet and you are presented with a magnificent looking V8 engine. It is hard to miss the Aston Martin Lagonda text on the valve covers and of course there is the plate with the name of the person who assembled the engine. The engine in this car was built by Fred Walters. All very Aston Martin! Everything presents as one would expect. The engine is bay is neat, clean and tidy. The underside of this car presents well. There is light surface corrosion on some of the components, however, this is not a typical English car underneath. The overall presentation is consistent with a 41 year old car that has been well cared for. As mentioned earlier in our write up, this car has not been driven since it arrived in Australia all those years ago. Before the car can be driven it will require recommissioning. Accompanying this car is a comprehensive history file dating back to new, which includes the original service book. This car has an incredible presence and it presents fabulously in the striking colour of storm red. We envisage the recommissioning to be relatively straight forward and have no doubt this car will drive every bit as good as it looks! A unique opportunity. Highlights: - Rare and desirable example of one the iconic Aston Martin V8 series. - Beautifully presented example of a quintessential British GT. - Fabulous original colour scheme. - Known history from new. Price $289,950 Background: Aston Martin has produced bespoke sports cars for over 100 years. The company began in 1913, when founders Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford realised their desire to build distinctive, high quality sports cars that were both exhilarating to drive and a beauty to behold. Martin regularly competed in hill climb races at Aston Clinton, and a simple combination of the name of the event and the driver gave birth to one of the most famous automotive marques. Source: www.astonmartin.com. Whilst Aston Martin produced some wonderful cars in their early years business, was always a struggle and the company was severely disrupted during both World War I and II. The company went bankrupt on more than one occasion and has endured many different owners throughout its history. David Brown acquired Aston Martin in February 1947 and the first car produced during his ownership was the Aston Martin 2 Litre Sports, later known as the DB1, which was built in extremely limited numbers from 1948 to 1950. This was succeeded by the Aston Martin DB2 in 1950, which featured a new double overhead cam straight six engine of 2.6 litre (2580 cc) capacity, and was a car that really put post war Aston Martin on the map. The David Brown era was arguably Aston Martins finest with the company winning LeMans in 1959 and the sixties producing the legendary DB4, DB5 and DB6 models. The first of the Newport Pagnell designed cars, the DBS, was introduced in 1967. The DBS was initially powered by Aston Martins tried and true 6 cylinder engine as the companys new V8 engine was not ready. From September 1967 through until May 1972 Aston Martin produced 829 DBS chassis. One of these was used in a crash test and 26 of these were later fitted with a V8 engine which leaves a total of 802 six cylinder Aston Martin DBS. Of these 802 cars, 621 were right hand drive and 181 left hand drive. The DBS was available with a five speed ZF manual gearbox or an automatic gearbox or. Interestingly, 317 of the right hand drive cars were fitted with the five speed manual gearbox. It is understood that Aston Martin only built circa 70 right hand drive examples equipped with the Vantage engine. In September 1969 the DBS was superseded by the DBS V8, powered by the all new 5.3 litre V8 engine which was finally ready for production. The DBS V8 remained in production through until April 1972 and circa 400 cars were built. It was then renamed and became the Aston Martin V8, which became a great success for the marque. The Aston Martin V8 was produced for 17 years, with production finally coming to an end in 1989. Just over 2,000 cars were built, plus the Volantes and Vantages. In October 1978 Aston Martin introduced the Aston Martin V8 Series 4, otherwise known as the Oscar India (Oscar India = October Introduction, from the phonetic alphabet). The car now sporting burr walnut trim, a blanked off bonnet scoop and a revised boot lid and rear wings to create a sculpted spoiler was visually very similar to the Vantage. The car remained in production through until 1985 and only 352 examples were produced.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1152457
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,692

1965 Maserati Mistral

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1206189
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,087

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1933 MG K1 / K3 Magnette Conversion. According to documentation on file, this car started its life as an MG K1 four door pillarless saloon that was finished in black with a green interior. It was delivered to Duthrie & Sons, Montrose, Angus, Scotland on the 6th of November 1933. The car was then sold to the first owner, AM Wilkie, on the 11th of November of the same year. The first recorded UK road registration was SR8731. Subsequent UK owners are noted as C Garton 7/37, G Gardner 4/38, PJ Skegg 1956 and CP Shaw 1964. At some stage the car found its way to Australia. It was acquired in March 1990 by a well known MG enthusiast on the Gold Coast. The current owner acquired the car in 2000 as a rolling chassis and boxes of parts. It is understood that the previous owner shortened the chassis from a wheel base of 9.0 (2.74m) to a wheelbase of 7 10 (2.39m) to build a recreation of a K3 Magnette. The project appealed to the current owner who engaged the services of highly regarded vintage car specialists Historic and Vintage Restorations (HVR) in Melbourne Initially progress was slow as the owner was focussed on two other projects. In 2006 the MG project got some real traction. The chassis was rebuilt to K3 specifications with cruciform cross member added and then painted. The suspension has a split steering axle, retempered springs, new bushes & shackles, refurbished dampers, extra rear shockers, rebuilt & respoked wheels and rebuilt 13 aluminium drum brakes with hydraulics. The engine was totally rebuilt with many news parts, including the block, crankshaft, rods and pistons. The cylinder head had new valves, springs and inlet manifold. All the engine ancillaries, including the supercharger, water pump, generator and starter were completely rebuilt. A new exhaust system was also fabricated. The car features a close ratio preselector gearbox which was also totally rebuilt. The new body was built from scratch out of lightweight aluminium. The HVR team has done a magnificent job and the body has been beautifully handcrafted. It has been fitted with rebuilt original lights and instruments, aero screens, re-built original screen and wipers. The car has an original K3 (K3004) radiator and radiator cowl. A new wiring loom has been installed. The interior was reupholstered in red leather and the car painted in the most stunning shade of magenta. As one can imagine, this was a challenging project. A significant amount of research was undertaken to ensure the car was built as accurately and correctly as possible. By 2011 the project was finished and the car was ready for its first test drive. Over the next three years the car was fettled and continuously improved. At some stage the original supercharger was replaced with a modern supercharger. Today this fabulous MG presents and drives exceptionally well. It really does present like a recently restored car. The car is physically quite small, but despite that it has an incredible presence. The first thing you notice is the colour. At first glance from a distance the car looks black, however, when you get closer you realise this is not the case. It is finished in the most magnificent shade of dark purple or magenta and the colour really suits the car. The paintwork is still in very good condition and one has to look hard to find any defects. Over the years the paint has retained its strong depth of colour and a nice gloss finish. The chrome work is a real feature on this car and it is all in excellent condition. The exhaust is usually not something we would mention in our write up on a car but on this car it is a work of art. The satin black coating is in excellent condition as is the heat wrapping. The car is fitted with a normal wind screen as well as two aero screens. They are in excellent condition with no scratches or stone chips evident. The wire wheels are painted and in very good condition. There is no curb rash and all the spokes are in good condition. The wheels are shod with Excelsior Comp H tyres, size 5.00-19. The tyres are in excellent condition, however, they are date stamped 2904 (week 29, 2004) and therefore should be replaced based on age. There is also a spare wheel mounted on the back of the car which is shod with the same tyre. The interior is minimalistic yet businesslike as one would expect in what is essentially a race car. Everything remains fresh and is in excellent condition. The red leather seats hardly show any sign of wear and provide excellent support. The painted dashboard, whilst simple, is exactly what you would expect in a car like this. It is in excellent condition and all the instruments are clear and appear to be in good working condition. Even the dark grey carpets are in excellent condition. Another feature of the car is the exposed preselector gearbox. The MG K3 was most likely the first race car to use a preselector as part of its original specification. We were genuinely excited to take the car out for our test drive. Starting the car is relatively easy. The car is fitted with a battery isolator and therefore the first step is to make sure that is in the on position. There is a row of toggle switches on the left hand side of the dash. There is a switch for the ignition and a switch for the fuel pump, which need to be turned on. After waiting patiently for the pump to prime the carburettors you press the starter button. The engine fires up easily and it immediately becomes obvious that this car means business. Wow . . . what a noise! With a cold engine on start up you need to feather the throttle initially and it will then soon settle into a smooth idle. Then you get to the interesting part. Initially, it feels a bit strange to select a gear first and then press the clutch to engage the gear, but you do quickly get used to it. In fact once you get the hang of it, the preselector gearbox is an absolute delight. To be able to have both hands on the steering wheel when you change gears allows you to focus on just steering the car There is only one way to describe driving this car . . . FUN !!! It is an absolute blast and one of the best prewar cars we have ever driven. The engine might be small, but in combination with the supercharger and the fact that the car weighs nothing it is surprisingly fast. Pre-selector gearboxes are often criticised for being slow and at times awkward. On this car it was quite the opposite, the gear changes were smooth and without hesitation. Because of its size, this car feels like you are going faster than actually are, but make no mistake in the blink of an eye you will have exceeded the speed limit. Importantly the brakes are also up to the task and they pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. All too soon our test drive comes to and end and we have to return the car to our showroom. Between 1933 and 1934 MG only built 33 K3s. These cars were incredibly successful in period and as a result they are highly collectible, extremely valuable and tend to be tightly held today. Whilst the road going MG K1, 181 units built from 1932 to 1934 and K2, 20 units built from 1933 to 1934 are also very rare cars in their own right, many have been converted into K3s. Some of these conversions have been done very well and others less so. This car has to be one of the best and it is a credit to everyone who has been involved in its build. This car was displayed at Motorclassica in 2019, which is Australias leading concours delegance ancd classic car show. The car was extremely well received, which is a further testament to its quality. Accompanying the car is a short tonneau cover, a long tonneau cover, a car cover, a period correct toolkit and the original supercharger. There is also a thick file of receipts from the restoration as well as some historical documentation. Highlights: - An accurate, MG K1-based conversion mirroring one of the most successful sports racing cars of the 1930s. - Powered by a supercharged, overhead camshaft, inline, six cylinder engine paired with a preselector gearbox. - Built by renowned vintage car specialists, HVR in Melbourne. - Fabulous K3 alternative at a fraction of the cost. - Ideal for vintage races, rallies, hill climbs, and other thrilling events worldwide. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $329,950. Background: MG is one of the worlds most iconic motoring brands. The company started out as a side line business of Morris Garages, the Oxford agent for Morris cars, owned by William Morris. In 1921 Cecil Kimber joined the company as a Sales Manager and became General Manager in 1922. To promote sales Kimber started modifying standard Morris Oxfords. These so called Kimber Specials carried both the Morris as well and an MG badge. On the 1st May 1924 Morris Garages registered the MG Octagon as a trademark. Demand soon resulted in a move to a larger premises in September 1925. Quickly followed by another move in 1927. By 1928 the business had grown so much a decision was made to separate it from Morris and the M.G. Car Company was established in March 1928. In 1929 the company moved to Abingdon and on the 21st July 1930 the M.G. Car Company Limited was established;. The first cars to be produced under the name MG in 1924 were special bodied Morris Cowleys. The first MG to specifically compete in sporting events is a car now known as Old Number One. It was produced in 1925 and was first seen at the 1925 Lands End Trial. Other MG models followed quickly but in 1928 at the Motor Show at Olympia MG introduced the MG M-Type Midget, which became the first of many sports cars produced by MG and was a big success for the company. In that same year MG also introduced the MG 18/80. This was the first MG with a chassis designed and built by MG. The 18/80 was equipped with a six cylinder engine with a capacity of 2,468cc. By 1931 MG was looking for a car to fill the gap between the M-Type and the 18/80 and it introduced the F-Type Magna which was powered by a 1,271cc six cylinder engine. The F-type remained in production until 1932 when it was superseded by the K-Type. The K-Types were available in two chassis lengths. The K1, which was introduced in 1932 and had a wheelbase of 90 (2.74m) and the K2, which was introduced a short time later in 1933 had a wheelbase of 7 10 (2.39m). Both models were powered by a 1,087cc six cylinder engine. MG also produced a racing variant of the K-Type, the K3. It used a short chassis and was powered by a supercharged version of the 1,087cc six cylinder engine mated to a preselector gearbox. The K3 was very successful, wining its class at the 1933 Mille Miglia. Its greatest success came at the 1934 Le Mans 24 Hours when it finished 4th overall and won the Index of Performance, driven by Roy Eccles and Charlie Martin. Only 33 K3s were ever built making it one of the rarest and most desirable MGs.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1211349
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 7,668

Details: A new arrival to Oldtimer Australia is this fabulous 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Sedanca De Ville by Hooper. The original summary build sheet on file confirms a date of sale of the 9th July 1931 to Jack Barclay Ltd in London, UK for G Ferguson Esq from Patcham on the south coast of England. The car was off test on the 5th September 1931 and sold to Ferguson on the 15th September 1931. The build sheets note the original coach builder as Hooper and that the long wheelbase chassis was fitted with a Sedanca body to design 4658. There is conflicting information on file regarding the cars very early history and its first owner is documented elsewhere as being actor Tom Walls. The car was purchased in the UK by WJ Bernard-Smith (otherwise known as knockout Smith) from Sydney and exported to Australia in either 1932 or 1933. Smith, who was a senior executive at Australian Glass Manufacturers Co Ltd and later Australian Consolidated Industries Ltd, was a long term owner of the car and later gifted it to his son KR (Ken) Bernard-Smith. The Smith family parted with the car in late 1976 or early 1977. They sold it to Michael Robinson, who found little use for the car and he sold it shortly thereafter. The car was sold by Robinson in July 1977 to Derek Freeman, at which time the odometer read 49,230 miles. Freeman, who was a Sydney dentist and MP used the car and later had it on display in Sydneys Powerhouse Museum. He penned an excellent write up on the car for Volume 23 Number 6, being the June 1979 issue of the Rolls-Royce Owners Club of Australias NSW Branch newsletter. The current owner acquired this fabulous, incredibly original and beautifully preserved car from Freeman on the 9th September 1998. The odometer read circa 56,000 miles. Since acquiring the car the current owner has completed a rolling restoration and continued to improve its presentation and drivability. Major work carried out to the car by the current owner includes: - Recent engine, front axle, radiator and steering rebuild. - Recent brake overhaul and rewiring. - Interior retrim in 2005. - Full repaint in the current colour scheme. The car is a multi concours winner, having won the Rolls-Royce Owners Club of Australias Federal Rally concours in 2010 and again 2022. It has also won a raft of other trophies at various Rolls-Royce Owners Club of Australia Federal Rallys and state events. It also won Best in Class (Pre War Classic UK & Euro) at Motorclassica 2016. The car is also documented in the book Rolls-Royce and Bentley in the Sunburnt Country by Tom Clarke & David Neely. A photo of this car is also included in the book The Rolls-Royce Phantom II & Phantom III by Nick Whitaker & Steve Stuckey. Today this grand old lady presents resplendently in its maroon and black colour scheme. The Sedanca De Ville coachwork has the open front section for the driver, which gives this car an incredible presence. The front section can of course be closed by sliding out the roof which is a job undoubtedly left for the chauffer. Overall, the paint remains in excellent condition with a strong depth of colour and a deep gloss finish. Incredibly, this car was painted some twenty years ago. The car has a vinyl roof, which is also in excellent condition. The paint is complimented by the chrome, which is presented with a mirror like finish. The grill, which is adorned by a magnificent spirit of ecstasy radiator cap, the headlights and hub caps are a real feature on all prewar Rolls-Royce motor cars and on this car they are exceptional. This car is fitted with Denman 6.50-20 tyres, which have plenty of tread, though should be replaced on age. The current owner has a new set of tyres on order which will accompany the car. The interior of this car is also beautifully presented. All the upholstery was renewed back in 2005 and it still presents exceptionally well. The leather is soft and supple and just typically Rolls-Royce. As you may notice in the photos the upright bolster on either side of the front seat has aged differently to the rest of the leather and today it presents in a slightly different colour. This is something a good leather doctor could easily rectify to keep the car as a serious concours contender! The burgundy carpet is in excellent condition as it has always protected by over mats. The timber work is beautifully presented and another feature of this car. The carpets, head lining and interior accessories are all similarly presented. The devil is in the detail of these Rolls-Royce Phantoms and things like the interior lights, door pulls, grab handles and the rear blind (which is operated by the driver and in working order) are each a work of art in their own right. All the instruments and controls are in very good condition and look to be in working order. Under the bonnet the massive 7,668 cc straight six engine presents essentially like new. The current owner proudly boasts that the engine bay is the most important part of the car for him to present at concours and the like. It is fair to say that the underside of this car is similarly well presented. Incredible! In addition to being regularly shown, this car does get regularly driven. It has been religiously maintained by vintage Rolls-Royce specialists Derby Works and is always on the button, ready to use and enjoy. On our recent test drive the car performed faultlessly. There is certainly a knack to driving these Phantoms and once you get it the experience is most rewarding. Today the odometer reads 62,642 miles. The car is fitted with a Tim Payne overdrive to make long distance cruising and rallies more comfortable. Another feature of this car is its tools, which are stored in three compartments, being one under each running board and the third under the front seat. And yes, we understand that the tool kit is 100% complete. Accompanying this car are two spare wheels, the tools, copies of various manuals and an excellent history file. The thick history file contains the original summary build sheet, York Motors service records from 1967 to 1977, subsequent maintenance records and a huge file of receipts since the current owner acquired the car in 1998. Highlights - Documented history from new. - Matching numbers example (chassis, engine and body). - Multiple concours winner, including twice overall winner at the RROCA Federal Rally concours and Best In Class (Pre War Classic UK & Euro) at Mortorclassica 2016. - Older cosmetic restoration, that still presents fabulously today. - Recent major mechanical work. - Just a STUNNING car inside and out. - Ready to show, use and enjoy. Price $289,950. Background: The legend that was to become Rolls-Royce was founded in May 1904 when a deal was struck between Frederick Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls. Shortly after the first Rolls-Royce motor car, the Rolls-Royce 10hp, was unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in December 1904. It was agreed that Rolls Royce would initially manufacture four different models being a two cylinder 10hp model, a three cylinder 15hp model, a four cylinder 20hp model and a six cylinder 20hp model. It was immediately apparent that to manufacture their cars Rolls Royce would require a larger factory and the decision was made to establish their headquarters and manufacturing facility on the outskirts of Derby in the east midlands of England. On the 15th March 1906 the company Rolls-Royce Limited was formed and during this year Royce had been developing an improved six-cylinder model with more power than the 30hp. Initially designated the 40/50hp, this was the companys first all-new model that was also to become known as the Silver Ghost. Introduced in 1907, the 40/50hp or Silver Ghost remained in production until 1926. Originally powered by a 7,036cc six-cylinder engine, this was increased to 7,428cc in 1909 and following rave reviews was designated by the English car magazine Autocar as the best car in the world. Like all car manufacturers Rolls-Royce was impacted by the First World War, however, post war the company made a strategic decision to manufacture a cheaper smaller car, enter the Rolls-Royce 20hp. This model was a success and produced alongside the Silver Ghost and its successor the Phantom ensuring the Rolls-Royce motor car company would survive and prosper. In 1931 Rolls-Royce acquired the Bentley motor car company. The Silver Ghost was an outstanding success and unbelievably a total of 7,874 cars were produced from 1907 to 1926 and it is understood that some 200 cars were sold new in Australia. A hard act to follow indeed, enter in 1925 the Rolls-Royce New Phantom known later as the Phantom 1. Although using the same chassis as the Silver Ghost the Phantom featured a new 7,668cc six cylinder engine. Like its predecessor, the Phantom was bodied by a number of different coach builders including Barker, Park Ward, Thrupp & Maberly, Mulliner, Hooper and others in the UK. In addition to building the Phantom at their plant in Derby, England, Rolls-Royce set up a manufacturing facility in Springfield, Massachusetts, in the United States of America to capitalise on the booming American market. The American built cars were mostly bodied by Brewster & Co and Fleetwood. In total 3,509 Rolls-Royce Phantoms were built from 1925 to 1929, comprising 2,269 chassis built in the UK and 1,240 chassis built in the USA. In 1929 Rolls-Royce introduced the Phantom II, which was powered by a refined version of the engine used in its predecessor, built on an entirely new chassis. Gearbox improvements, including synchromesh, were added as the Phantom II evolved. In total 1,681 chassis were built through the six years of Phantom II production from 1929 through until 1935. The Phantom III was introduced in 1936 and was the last of the big engined prewar Rolls-Royces. This model introduced the 7,338cc V12 engine and a number of other technological advancements at that time. These were very complicated motor cars. Only 727 Phantom III chassis were built from 1936 through to 1939.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1209883
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,299

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this low mileage, factory right hand drive, matching numbers 1980 Porsche 930 Turbo. This particular example was delivered to its first owner from Carryduff, near Belfast, in Northern Ireland on 3rd April 1980. The car was delivered through Glen Henderson (Stuttgart) Ltd in Ayr, Ireland. The car was delivered in silver metallic (paint code Z272) with dark blue leather (trim code 52). The car was delivered with the following options: speedometer with two scales mph / km/h (option code 020), rear fog light, right (option code 466), right hand drive vehicle (option code 483), headlamps for left hand traffic (option code 492), brake fluid warning system (option code 592), impact absorbers front and rear (m option code 058), sport seat left and right, leather (m option code 409), air conditioning (with front and rear humidifier) (m option code 559) and electric sunroof (m option code 650). Accompanying the car is the original Drivers Manual Maintenance Record (service book), which confirms the car has been used sparingly its entire life. It received its first service on the 9th July 1983. At that time the odometer read 11,814 miles. Subsequent services are the 6th August 1986 when the odometer read 29,604 miles and the 29th February 1988 when the odometer read 35,385 miles. There is a note in the service book stating that the speedometer was changed at 36,875 miles. The next service after that was executed on the 1st April 1993 when the odometer read 10,654 miles. The documentation on file confirms that the car has had two owners in the UK before it found its way to Australia. It was imported into Australia in 1995 as a personally imported vehicle and complianced in July 1995. The current owner, who has an extensive and eclectic collection of cars, acquired this 930 Turbo in Sydney in August 1996. At that time the odometer read 14,626 miles. The car was registered in NSW with the registration TVJ 600. He used the car sparingly in the early days of his ownership. It was serviced in August 1999 when the odometer read 15,667 miles. Shortly thereafter the car was moved into static storage where it remained for the twenty years! Today the odometer reads 15,848 miles, which means that the car has travelled 52,773 miles from new. Porsche 930 Turbos present well in just about any colour, but silver is just about as good as it gets! This car looks fabulous in the photographs, but even better in the flesh! When you walk up to the car you cannot help but be impressed with its appearance. First impressions are . . . WOW! This car is an incredible time capsule and it has been beautifully preserved for a 44 year old car! The paint is generally in excellent condition, with the only exception being the right rear guard which has a few stone chips. The paint is most likely original and it has retained a strong depth of colour with a nice deep gloss finish. The black trim on the car is generally in good condition, though the protectors on the rear guards show some discoloration. All the lights and lenses are in excellent condition including the reflector strip between the tail lights. These reflector strips are often damaged and fade over time, but on this car it still presents like new. Both the Porsche badge on the front and the Turbo badge on the rear are in very good condition. The glass, which looks to be original is also in good condition with no cracks evident. The wheels on this car are in good condition with no kerb rash evident. They are shod with BF Goodrich Comp T/A tyres. The front tyres are 205/55ZR16 which are date stamped 398 and the rear tyres are 225/50ZR16 which are date stamped 298. The tyres should be replaced based on their age. Open the door and you are welcomed by a very cool interior. We just love the blue leather with the fabric Pasha (Schachbrett in German) inserts. Porsche offered this trim option for a short period, from 1980 to 1984. The seats are still in excellent condition with no cracks or tears in the leather nor in the fabric. The are comfortable and still provide ample support. The rear seats appear to have hardly been used if at all. The steering wheel and dashboard are both in very good condition. In Australia, the top of the dashboard on this era of Porsche often gets affected by the sun, but that is not the case here. The only minor defect is some wear on the top of the instrument binnacle, most likely caused by a ring. A good leather doctor could easily fix this. The door cards and carpets present equally as well. The instruments are all crisp, clear and present like new. In the centre of the dashboard youll also find a period computerised Panasonic radio cassette player fitted and in the centre console the cassette storage system. Under the front bonnet everything is neat, clean and tidy. There is an original unused space saver spare wheel as well as a jack and a toolkit. This Porsche 930 Turbo has not been driven for some 20 years and as a result it will require recommissioning. The engine was recently checked by a Porsche specialist and it does turn over freely by hand. Accompanying the car is its original Drivers Manual Maintenance Record (service book), the original speedometer, an original spare wheel, a toolkit and a jack. Highlights: - A factory RHD 930 turbo presented in its STUNNING original colour scheme. - Desirable pasha interior. - Matching numbers. - Books & tools. - An incredible time capsule. Price $289,950. Background: The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 aluminium bodied cars by hand in their small factory at Gmündbefore relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany. The rest they say is history as the 356 evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built. A hard act to follow indeed . . . but its replacement, the Porsche 911 went on to become a legend! The evolution of the Porsche 911 is probably the greatest sports car story of all time. First introduced in 1963 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, and then designated as a 901, the successor to the 356 took the world by storm. To avoid conflict with Peugeot, who claimed exclusive rights to car names with three digits having a zero in the middle, the car was renamed as 911. The first production 911 was built in 1964 and it was powered by an air cooled 1991cc 6-cylinder engine. The car evolved with increases in engine capacity to 2.2 litres, 2.4 litres, 2.7 litres, 3.0 litres and 3.3 litres. There were styling changes also, but one always recognised the car as a 911. Today the first series of 911s is recognised as the cars built from 1963 to 1989 and include the very popular Porsche 911 and 930 Turbo models. Of these the small bumper or pre impact bumper cars built up to 1973 are today regarded as the real classic 911, however, that comes at a price. In the last few years astute collectors and enthusiastshave seen great value in 1970s and 1980s model 911s. There were many significant incarnations of the 911 and arguably one of the most important was the introduction of the Porsche Turbo. Whilst Porsche had toyed with turbo charging previously, and indeed used it successfully on their race cars, it wasnt until the introduction of the Porsche 930 Turbo (also known as the Porsche Turbo or Porsche 911 Turbo in some markets) that turbo charging was available on a Porsche production car. The Porsche 930 Turbo was first shown at the Paris Motor Show in late 1974 and the car entered production the following year. At the time the car caused an absolute sensation. It was easily distinguishable from the standard 911 by its body shape and specifically by its distinctive wide wheel arches that had to accommodate the ultra low profile Pirelli P7 tyres and of course the large rear spoiler or whale tail. Powered by a 2996 cc 6 cylinder turbo charged engine delivering 260hp the car was exhilarating to drive and by todays standards incredibly raw. These early cars are known for their exhilarating acceleration coupled with challenging handling characteristics and extreme turbo lag. The acceleration was neck snapping reaching 0-100 km/hr in just over 5 seconds and the top speed was quoted to be in excess of 250 km/hr. In period, the car was recognised in the same company as the Lamborghini Countach, Ferrari Boxer and Aston Martin Vantage as one of THE supercars of the 70s. Porsche made its first significant change to the Turbo in 1978 when the engine capacity was increased to 3,299 cc, an intercooler was added and the brakes upgraded. In this guise the car was produced for a decade being ultimately succeeded by the 964 series in 1990.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1155247
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,453

1937 Lagonda LG45 Drophead Coupe

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1209916
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,897

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this absolutely magnificent Mercedes-Benz 190SL. The Lieferschein or Delivery Note on file confirms this example was delivered in November 1957 and exported to New York. The car was finished in the classic Mercedes-Benz colour of white (paint code DB50) with a black interior and black soft top. It also confirms that the car is matching numbers. The car was restored by SL Classics in Germany in 2015. It was then sold by Gooding & Company at their Amelia Island auction in March 2016 to a UK collector. More recently, the car has found its way to Australia. Today the odometer reads 285 miles, which is most likely the mileage since the car was restored. This car is STUNNING in every regard, apart from a very minor scrape under the front bumper which most likely occurred when the car was shipped. Accompanying the car is an unrestored hard top. Hard to find better. Highlights: - Restored by SL Classics in Germany to an exceptionally high standard. - Original colour and matching numbers. - Fitted luggage. - Ready show, use and enjoy. Price $314,950 Background: Following the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, Europes car industry was decimated. In Germany both Daimler and Benz went back to producing cars post-war, however, times were tough. A merger between Daimler and Benz would ensure that both companies survived and following a technical co-operation agreement in 1924, the companies formally merged on the 1st July 1926. Mercedes-Benz was born! Subsequently, Mercedes-Benz went on to build some of the greatest cars of all time. The cars from Stuttgart bearing the three-pointed star all had one thing in common . . . they were renowned for their technical innovation, build quality, luxury and performance. In the 1950s Mercedes Benz produced one of the greatest cars of all time the iconic 300SL Gullwing and 300SL Coupe. Whilst fabulous cars, they were very expensive and generally sold to the rich and famous. Mercedes wanted to build a sporting luxury car that still looked classical in the mould of the 300SL, but it had to be affordable and the plan was to build such a car in far greater numbers than the exclusive 300SLs. Enter the Type W121 or 190SL as it became known in the mid 1950s. This model was an outstanding success and circa 25,000 cars were built over the next 8 years of production. The formula worked and Mercedes Benz carried it on with great success in the 1960s with the Type W113 230SL/250SL/280SL models. This evolved into the Type R107/C107 280SL(C)/350SL(C)/380SL(C)/450SL(C) models built throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Mercedes-Benz marketed the 190SL as . . . as sports car for all seasons. To quote their website: . . . Sporting elegance, safety and comfort with these qualities the 190 SL conquered a whole new circle of enthusiastic fans of dynamic driving. Mercedes-Benz unveiled the prototype of the 190 SL (W 121) at the International Motor Sports Show in New York in February 1954, alongside the production version of the 300 SL Gullwing. Although the two-seater roadster with folding soft top stirred passions, it was to undergo a further thorough revision by the Mercedes-Benz designers known at the time as stylists. In March 1955, a full year after the New York premiere, the production version went on display at the Geneva Motor Show. Like its elder brother, the spectacular 300 SL Gullwing, the 190 SL rapidly became one of the most coveted dream cars of its day. Although less powerful than the 300 SL, it generated no less excitement and opened up the SL legend to a wider circle of customers. By 1963 sales had totalled 25,881 units. And even long-distance drives were enjoyable thanks to the comfortable suspension. The handsome sports car for all occasions was particularly popular among female drivers, who appreciated not only the sporting elegance of its design, but also the open-air feeling that came as standard. With its easy-to-operate soft top and optionally available coupé hardtop, the 190 SL was the first SL to combine the possibility of open-top driving with absolute all-weather capability.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1164736
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,496

1967 Mercedes-Benz 250SL

CALL 07 3171 1953
12 result(s)
Sort by

show

results

The information contained within classified listings on TradeUniqueCars.com.au is generated by the private and dealer advertisers. Please confirm listing details including price and specifications directly with the seller.