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New & Used Unique Cars For Sale in northgate

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  • RefCode: TA1049464
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,580

Oldtimer Australia is proud to offer a 1955 Aston Martin DB2/4 MkI barn find / restoration project.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1083178
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,442

The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful; though they had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. Whilst the SS100 is indeed a fabulous car, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The 120 in its name referred to its 120 mph top speed, which made the XK120 the worlds fastest production car in its day. It was available in two open versions, first as the roadster (designated OTS, for open two-seater), then also as a drophead coupe (DHC) from 1953. The car was also available as a closed or fixed head coupe (FHC) from 1951. The XK120 was succeeded by the XK140 which was launched in late 1954 and sold through until 1957. Whilst the XK140 looked similar to the XK120 there were in fact many subtle and indeed important differences. The XK140 featured a more spacious cabin and had improved brakes, suspension and steering. Visually the car had American style bumpers with overriders, a different grille (that had fewer, thicker vertical bars), a chrome strip on the bonnet & boot and an emblem Jaguar Winner Le Mans 1951-3 on the boot. The final iteration of the XK was the XK150 that was released in 1957. Whilst its family resemblance to its forbearers is obvious the XK150 was in fact a very different car. Most noticeable was the change to a one piece windscreen and the smoother wing line from the front to the rear of the car. Cabin space was significantly improved making the XK150 a far more comfortable car to drive. Mechanically the first XK150s were similar to the XK140s, however, an SE variant with a modified cylinder head giving more power and an S variant with triple SU carburettors giving even more power were soon available. In 1959 engine capacity was increased from 3.4 litres to 3.8 litres. Like the XK120 both the XK140 and XK150 were offered in three body styles being the roadster, drophead coupe and fixed head coupe. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1956 Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupe. This car is fitted with the factory C-Type cylinder head as confirmed by the S suffix on the engine number. It is confirmed as having matching numbers chassis, engine (block and cylinder head) and body numbers. This particular car is a UK delivered, factory right hand drive example. According to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate on file this particular car was completed on the 30th April 1956 and despatched on the 16th May 1956 through Henleys in London. It was delivered to Naomi Cotton from Bournemouth who first registered the car as NC140. Interestingly, our research shows that in 1957 she bought an XK150 SE FHC 3.4 and transferred the registration of NC140 to that car. Then in 1960 she purchased an Aston Martin DB4. She must have been quite a wealthy lady! The XK140 was originally finished in British racing green with a biscuit piped suede green interior. The heritage certificate also specifies this car was delivered with a 4-speed manual close ratio gearbox with overdrive. Not much more is known about the early history of the car. From the UK Vehicle Registration Document (V5) we do know the car only had two registered owners in the UK from 1984 until when the current owner purchased the car in the UK in July 2001. He purchased the car from Chapel End Cars at Nuneaton and subsequently imported it into Australia. There is an Import Approval on file dated 15th August 2001. When the car arrived in Australia it was in a fairly poor condition. The owner contacted Jaguar specialist Mike Roddy Motors in Melbourne to discuss options for restoring the car. In the end he decided to do it properly and embarked on a frame off restoration. Mike Roddy disassembled the car and took care of all the mechanicals. The body work and painting were entrusted to Peter Denny at Stylerod Panels in Kilsyth, Victoria. All chrome work was done by Classic Chrome in Geelong. The owner sourced a lot of new parts from well known Jaguar part suppliers like Guy Broad in the UK, XK Unlimited in the US and Jagdaim in Melbourne. All in all, it took over 10 years to complete the project. Once completed the car was stunning, however, it is great to see it did not become a trailer queen! Yes this car was pampered but it was also used and enjoyed and it has travelled some 12,000 miles since it was restored. The car was restored as original except for the addition of a cooling system header tank andthermal fan which more than copes with the Australian summer. The globes in the tail lights have been replaced with LED boards, imported from the USA, so they are now highly visible even in direct sunlight. It also has a stainless steel exhaust system with the mufflers an exact copy of the originals. Today the car presents and drives superbly. The exterior presents exceptionally well and the interior still presents like new. The paintwork is excellent and it still has a good depth of colour and a high gloss finish. There are a few very minor blemishes here and there, but were being fussy! All the external trim and the chrome work are in good condition, as is all the glass. The wire wheels are a feature and all in good condition on this car. The car is fitted with Kuhmo P215/70R16 radial tyres all round. The interior of this car is just stunning. The leather remains soft and supple and in excellent condition, belying the 12,000 miles travelled since the restoration was completed. The timber work is lovely and even the carpets are in excellent unmarked condition. All of the instruments and controls present well and are in working order. Purists will note the bank of non original switches to the right of the steering column which operate the windscreen washers, thermos fan, overdrive, horn, drivelights and choke. So how does this Jaguar XK140 perform out on the road? Time to find out . . . turn on the ignition check, flick the switch for the choke check, wait a few seconds for the fuel pump to feed some fuel in the carburettors check . . . the car starts easily at the first push of the starter button. Once you have started the car it only needs the choke for a few more seconds before you can turn it off and the car will settle into an easy idle. The 3.4 litre engine in this XK140 is incredibly smooth. That said, once you blip the throttle the car has an edge and you can feel that it just begs to be driven. So lets go! Out on the open road this car is just a delight to drive and it has a real presence about it. As noted above, the engine is smooth, so too are gear changes (yes it still has its original Moss box!) and there are no nasty rattles or squeaks to be heard. Everything looks to be in working order and this car is one of the best driving XKs we have experienced. The restoration has stood the test of time which is a credit to Mike Roddy and his team and of course its current owner. Accompanying the car is a Heritage Certificate, an excellent history file, restoration receipts & photos, an owners manual, parts manual and other miscellaneous documentation. There is also a spare wheel, jacking tools and grease gun, which are all as new in the boot. This Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupes current mature owner has made the difficult decision to sell. Therefore, the car is now looking for its next custodian. Highlights: * A factory right hand drive, fully matching numbers example. * Desirable SE specification XK140 with the C-type cylinder head. * Full frame off restoration by Jaguar Specialist Mike Roddy Motors. * Just a wonderful car that still presents and drives exceptionally well. There are XKs and there are XKs . . . this car is one of the best! Price $199,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1100256
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,164

The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 aluminium bodied cars by hand in their small factory at Gmünd before relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany. The rest they say is history as the 356 evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built. A hard act to follow indeed . . . but its replacement, the Porsche 911 went on to become a legend! The evolution of the Porsche 911 is probably the greatest sports car story of all time. First introduced in 1963 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, and then designated as a 901, the successor to the 356 took the world by storm. To avoid conflict with Peugeot, who claimed exclusive rights to car names with three digits having a zero in the middle, the car was renamed as 911. The first production 911 was built in 1964 and it was powered by an air cooled 1991cc 6-cylinder engine. The car evolved with increases in engine capacity to 2.2 litres, 2.4 litres, 2.7 litres, 3.0 litres and 3.3 litres. There were styling changes also, but one always recognised the car as a 911. Today the first series of 911s is recognised as the cars built from 1963 to 1989 and include the very popular Porsche 911 and 930 Turbo models. Of these the small bumper or pre impact bumper cars built up to 1973 are today regarded as the real classic 911, however, that comes at a price. In the last few years astute collectors and enthusiastshave seen great value in 1970s and 1980s model 911s. The Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 was introduced in 1983 as a successor to the 911SC. Interestingly, it was the first time the Carrera name had been used since 1977. Visually the new car was similar to its successor, both internally and externally. The major change to the new car was its engine. Whilst based on the SCs 3.0 litre power plant, Porsche claimed the 911 Carrera engine was 80 per cent new. The capacity was increased to 3164cc and a revised piston design increased the compression ratio to 10.3:1 on all but North American cars. But the Carreras main innovation was its Bosch Motronic 2 engine management system. This was the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control the ignition and fuel systems. In addition, the fuel injection was updated to Bosch LE-Jetronic and the induction and exhaust systems were revised. The upshot of these improvements was that power rose to 231 bhp at 5900 rpm, with torque hitting 284 Nm at 4800rpm. Porsche claimed fuel consumption to be 10 percent better than that of the SC, because of the greater efficiency of the electronically controlled engine. The last of the 911 Carrera 3.2s was built in 1989 and the model was most popular with circa 76,000 cars built during six years of production. The approximate breakdown of models was c35,500 coupes, c20,000 cabriolets and c18,500 Targas. Porsche also offered the 911 Carrera 3.2 with the option of the Turbo body (option code M491), which is most often referred to as the wide body or in some markets Supersport. Today the Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 is recognised as an 80s icon and these cars are now becoming highly sought after. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a stunning 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe. Being a late model Carrera 3.2 this car has the desirable G50 gearbox. This UK delivered, factory right hand drive particular example was sold new to Janet McWhire from Comber, Northern Ireland on the 1st August 1988. The car was sold though Isaac Angew (Mallusk) Ltd in Newtonabbey. This car was delivered new in Silver (paint code 980 S7) with a Marine Blue interior (interior trim code SW, carpet colour code 4KV). The car was delivered new with the following options: recoil bumpers, heated driver and passenger seats, Blaupunkt Toronto radio cassette, high fidelity package, amplifier system, rear seat belts, forged alloy wheels anti-theft device, rear wiper, electronic front left and right seats, spoilers, sport shock absorbers, sun roof and luggage compartment trimmed in black velour carpet. The car remained in Ireland for the next 4 years, during which time it changed hands twice. In 1992 the car found its way to England where it was registered as HDZ 3033. The car remained in the UK from 1992 through until 2011, passing through a number of careful owners. The service book and history file confirm that this car has been impeccably maintained by Porsche / Porsche specialists since new. The car then found its way to Australia. There is an Import Approval on file dated 20th of January 2011. The car remained with its new owner in Sydney for the next 9 years, however, it was sparingly used travelling a meagre 400 miles in this time. The current owner of this Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe acquired the car in April 2020 and went on a journey to make, what was a very good car, a great car. Over the past year or so he has spent in excess of $50,000 to bring the car to its current level. It started with a major service by well respected Brisbane based Porsche specialist DHM Motorsport. All fluids were changed, the valve clearances were checked and adjusted where necessary, the brake callipers were overhauled, new brake pads & wear sensors were installed and the reverse light switch was replaced. The owner then decided to make some cosmetic improvements to the car. It was solid underneath but it had surface rust on suspension components and generally throughout the underside of the car. The plan was a quick tidy up of the more significant issues, however, this was a case of when youve started where do you stop! One thing led to the next before he knew it he was doing a complete underbody restoration. The entire suspension was removed from the car and worn parts were replaced with new genuine Porsche parts, all acquired through Porsche Brisbane. New shock absorbers front & rear, control arms, front & rear disc rotors, ball joints, rear spring plates & bearing covers, using new bolts/fasteners, were fitted. At the same time a host of parts were vapour blasted and powder coated, including the front struts, trailing arms, front hubs and subframe, oil cooler guard, front tow hook & under tray and the disc brake backing plates. The original 16-inch Fuchs wheels have been completely refurbished by Depulu Wheels in Ashmore on the Gold Coast and present like new. To complete the look new centre caps and new Pirelli P Zero tyres have been fitted. The original exhaust has been replaced with a new TT stainless steel system, including extractors. It sounds great and gives the car a really aggressive exhaust note, without being overly loud. Importantly, the original exhaust (which is in good condition) comes with the car. The end result is one absolutely fabulous Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe. Today this car presents essentially like new. It is difficult to fault and would not be out of place sitting alongside the new cars at The Porsche Centre Brisbanes Newstead show room. The paint work on the car is exceptional and it is a struggle to find any paint defects. We found two very small marks on the car, one on the roof and the other one is behind the door handle on the drivers side. All of the external trim is in excellent condition, complimenting the paintwork perfectly. The glass is original and in excellent condition all round. There are no chips or marks on the windscreen. The interior is a real time capsule. The dark blue leather is a perfect colour contrast with the silver exterior and it is in excellent condition. There is the slightest amount of patina, but its condition and presentation belies that this is a 30+ year old car. The instruments, controls, steering wheel, dash, head lining and even the carpets are in similar condition. As noted previously, this is a well optioned car that is fitted with a factory electric sunroof, electric windows and electric operated & heated seats. All operate perfectly. The only upgrade is the radio. A new Blaupunkt Bremen radio has been installed which looks almost identical the factory original, however, it has the added benefit of modern technology and has blue tooth. The presentation of this car is impeccable but will it be as good to drive? After driving the car for less than 5 minutes that question is answered . . .YES, the car drives every bit as good as it looks! Not surprisingly, given all of the work done to the car, it is incredibly tight and firm on the road. The steering is direct and the G50 gearbox in this car is smooth and easy to operate, something you notice immediately as soon as you select first gear. The engine in this car is strong it revs freely through the rev range. After 20 minutes out on the road we can confirm that this car lives up to its reputation in every way. These late model Carrera 3.2s are fantastic cars to drive and this example is one of the very best. COVID restrictions ignored, we would have no hesitation to drive this car to Melbourne tomorrow! Today the odometer reads 101,077 miles. Video inspections are welcome. Highlights: - magnificently presented late model 911 Carrera 3.2 with the desirable G50 gearbox - highly optioned car with factory sunroof. - finished in a stunning colour combination. - low mileage, with only 101,077 miles on the odometer. - known history from new - books (including a fully stamped service book), tools and jack - just a magnificent motor car Price: $194,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1099624
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 2

Today Fiat is a subsidiary of Stellantis, a company formed in 2021 that is a merger of FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) and the PSA Group or Peugeot SA. Stellantis is based in The Netherlands and includes the following brands in its stable: Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Chrysler, Citroën, Dodge, DS, Fiat, Fiat Professional, Jeep, Lancia, Maserati, Mopar, Opel, Peugeot, Ram and Vauxhall. Fiat, which is an abbreviation for Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino, has a fascinating and rich history dating back to 1899. It was founded by Italian entrepreneur Giovanni Agnelli on 11th July 1899. Later that year, the first ever Fiat production car, the Fiat 3½ HP was released. Over the next ten years Fiat went from strength to strength establishing itself as one of Europes major car manufacturers and the company was listed on the Milan stock exchange in 1903. Over the last forty years the Fiat name has been synonymous with budget priced family cars. However, in the early years Fiat was recognised as building some of the worlds very best cars. In the early 1900s a Fiat cost more than four times the price of a Ford Model T. Post World War II Fiat built some world class sporting cars, including the Fiat 8V or Otto Vu of which just over 100 examples were built from 1952 through until 1954. Fiat always built cars with a sporting pedigree and many of their models were offered as a saloon, coupe or cabriolet. In 1936 Fiat introduced the Fiat 500 A Topolino (or little mouse) which was then the smallest mass-produced car in the world. Its low price made it accessible to people who had never before been able to afford a car. These fabulous little cars pioneered what is today referred to as budget priced small cars. In addition to the 2-door sedan, there was also a transformable version with a sunroof and a van version originally created for the army. The post-war period saw the launch of the 500 B in 1948, boasting a new engine and various technical innovations to improve performance and efficiency. But the novelty lay in its giardiniera version, a genuine compact family car with 4 seats and a big loading space when the back seat was down. The 500 C arrived in 1949, with an aluminium cylinder head, a heating system and especially a more modern body, in which the headlights were sunk into the front guards. The Topolino morphed into the Fiat 600 in 1955 and the Fiat 500 Nuova in 1957. The Nuova was produced from 1957 through untill 1961. It featured a fabric roof which folded down to the rear of the vehicle, suicide doors and was powered by a 497cc engine generating 13 hp. The 500 Nuova was succeeded by the 500 D, which was produced from 1960 through until 1965. This was the last model with suicide doors. In 1965 the Fiat 500 F or Berlina was introduced. The 500 F was produced from 1965 through until 1973 and the fabric roof was also changed and now only covered half of the roof. It also has an uprated engine bored out to 499 cc generating 18hp. The Fiat 500 was available as a two door saloon as well as a two door station wagon or estate (Giardiniera). Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for a sale a 1970 Fiat 500 F two door saloon. This Fiat 500 Fs early history is not known, however, it is understood to have been a long term Perth car. The current owner acquired the car in March 2008 and at that time the odometer read 68,132 km and the car was registered in WA as 1CRG951. Shortly after acquiring the car it had some mechanical problems. In 2009, with the odometer reading 68,213km, the engine was completely rebuilt with oversize pistons and the cylinder head was reconditioned. All this work was done by Brisbane based Fiat specialist APF Motors. Other work done included the installation of a new front bumper bar (which was damaged when the car was transported from Perth to Brisbane), fitting of seat belts in the front & rear, fitting new muffler brackets and reconditioned the starter motor. In 2018 the brakes were completely overhauled including the installation of a new brake master cylinder, new front wheel cylinders, new brake hoses and new brake shoes. In 2019 the wheels were refurbished and a new set of Michelin X tyres where fitted. Today this car presents well. The rosso paintwork is vibrant and from say a meter it looks fabulous as you will see from the photos. On closer inspection there are some minor defects in the paint, most noticeably some small pimples, particularly on the bonnet. The exterior trim and all of the glass is in good condition. The fabric soft top is also in good condition and it seals well. The interior in these little Fiats is basic, yet charming. There is only the speedo in the instrument binnacle, which is in excellent condition. All of the controls on this car are in working order. In this particular example the white instrument binnacle and white steering wheel create a nice contrast with the red dashboard. The upholstery is all in good condition with no rips or tears. Surprisingly, the seats are relatively comfortable given their simplicity. Driving a Fiat 500 is always great fun! These little cars have a huge cuteness factor and whilst they are small, they certainly stand out on the open road! You cant help but get noticed by other road users and pedestrians wherever you go. Theres always lots of finger pointing and smiles as you drive on by! The starting procedure is simple. You put the key in the ignition and turn it clockwise. These cars have a choke lever and starter lever, both located between the seats. Pull the choke lever up, then pull the starter lever and the little 499cc engine bursts to life immediately. It takes a few seconds for the engine to warm up and once it has you can push the choke handle back and the engine will settle into a smooth idle. Its time for a test drive! Whilst on paper the 499cc engine doesnt have a lot of power, the car doesnt weigh much and as a result it is quite zippy and surprisingly easy to drive in modern day traffic. The engine is strong and the car has no issue accelerating hard up to 60 km/h and beyond when necessary! The gearbox has no synchro so it takes a little getting used to. You soon get the hang of how to drive the car and the lost art of double de-clutching gets you up and down the gearbox smoothly. This car handles well and the brakes pull the car up effectively in a straight line. Accompanying the car is a Fiat 500 instruction manual, an owners workshop manual and a history file with receipts of the work done since the car was purchased in 2008. There is also a spare wheel and jack. Today the odometer reads 68,794 km, confirming the car has been used sparingly throughout the current owners 13+ years of ownership. Highlights a well presented and well maintained example of an iconic car mechanically sorted and ready to use and enjoy. recently fitted with new tyres only 580 km travelled since the engine was rebuilt. La dolce vita indeed! Price $34,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1055962
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,390

Apple, Coco Cola, McDonalds and Nike are brands recognisable the world over. So is Ferrari and interestingly the iconic Italian luxury sports car manufacturer was named The Worlds Strongest Brand in the 2019 Brand Finance Global 500 Report. Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 out of Alfa Romeos race division as Auto Avio Costruzioni the company built its first car in 1940. The Second World War halted Ferraris dream, which was finally realised in 1947, when the first car bearing his name, the Ferrari 125S, was built. From that day on Ferrari race cars dominated the world over, winning race after race and many world championships in Formula One, sports car racing and endurance racing. Ferrari built exclusive sports cars for the road too, but in the early days, this was primarily to fund his motor racing! The Cavallino Rampate or prancing horse was the symbol chosen by Ferrari and like the golden arches it is recognised by just about every man, woman and child on the planet! The Ferrari road cars built in the 1940s and early to mid-1950s were produced in very small numbers and it was not until the introduction of the 250 Series cars that production numbers increased. Almost 1,000 Ferrari 250 GTEs were built from 1959 1963. The 250 Series also contained some of the most special Ferraris ever built, including the Ferrari 250LM, 250 SWB, 250 California Spider and of course the 250 GTO. The 250 Series cars were superseded by the 275 Series cars, the 330 Series cars and later the 365 Series cars. The nomenclature designated the cubic capacity of each cylinder. So a Ferrari 275 GTB was powered by a 12 cylinder engine of 3300cc capacity. The late 1960s and early 1970s were a fabulous time for Ferrari. Its flagship 365 GTB/4 Daytona was a resounding success and Enzos big risk the Dino 246 was also selling very well. At that time Ferrari wanted to continue with his tradition of producing high performance Grand Touring cars with a 2+2 configuration and the 365 GTC/4, which was a successor to the 365 GT 2+2 and the 365 GTC, filled that niche. The early 1970s were a time of innovation and Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati et al. continued to introduce new models in an endeavour to trump the other. The 365 GTC/4 was only in production in 1971 & 1972 and its successor the 365 GT/4 2+2 was first shown in October 1972 at the Paris Motor Show. This car, designed and built by Pininfarina, featured unique styling and whilst the sharp angular lines were very new for Ferrari it did share the characteristic design feature of a swage line dividing the body into an upper and a lower half with the 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Unlike the GTC/4 the GT/4 2+2 couldseat four people in relative comfort. Mechanically the 365 GT/4 2+2 was almost identical to the 365 GTC/4 and its 4390 cc quad cam V12 engine with six Weber 38DCOE side draught carburettors put out an impressive 320 bhp and was capable of propelling the car from 0-60 mph (0-100 km/hr) in a healthy 6.4 seconds and a top speed in excess of 150 mph (250 km/hr). In period the car was well regarded though the oil crisis of the 1970s made the car somewhat difficult to sell and only 524 examples were built from 1973 to 1976. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this 1974 Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2. This particular car is an Australian delivered, factory right-hand drive example that was delivered new through WH Lowe Pty Ltd. The car was originally finished in oro kelso (gold) with a pelle beige interior. The car has a factory delivery date of April 1974. The Australian compliance plate is dated 10/74. The car is understood to have been sold new into Townsville, in north Queensland. Its subsequent history is known as this car has been in Queensland its entire life. The second owner was a Brisbane based lawyer and car guy who owned this 365 GT/4 2+2 through until 1986. The car was then purchased by people well known in the Ferrari Club and the car remained in their ownership through until 2006. Its fourth owner kept the car until 2014 and it was then sold through the Brisbane Ferrari dealer at the time, Euromarque, to its current owner. It is not known exactly when the car was repainted red, but it was most likely done in the early 1980s. The car has clearly been very well maintained throughout its life and it presents in excellent all round condition today. The car had a major engine rebuild in 2006. The engine has been re-bored, new pistons fitted, new valves & guides fitted, balanced and reassembled. This work was carried out at 98,000 miles. Additional work completed at the time included: replaced engine mounts, new clutch, gearbox overhauled, front shocks refurbished, front & rear rotors fitted along with pads. The car was sparingly used from 2006 through until 2014 and it suffered through lack of use. The car had developed a number of oil leaks as a result of gaskets and seals drying out. As a condition of purchase by the current owner in 2014 a number of items required attending to. The work done at this time included an engine out tidy up, with a number of gaskets and seals replaced. Additionally, the steering pump was overhauled, new engine mounts were fitted, the exhaust hangers replaced, the sway bar bushes & front lower shock bushes were replaced, the oil temperature sender was replaced, the car had all its fluids changed and a new battery fitted. All the work was completed by Euromarque. Oldtimer Australia has had the privilege of selling a number of Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2s and this car is another good one. This is just a beautifully presented and driving car. Whilst the car carries an older repaint, it still retains a great depth of colour and high gloss. There are some very minor stone chips, imperfections and small cracks in the paint, but you have to look hard. All of the exterior trim, lenses, chrome work, bumpers (which are original and have been restored) and the glass are also in good condition. This 365 has obviously been very well cared for throughout its life, evidenced by the condition of the interior of the car which looks to be original. The cabin is just a lovely place to be, presenting with just the right amount of patina. There are a few small splits starting to appear on the front seats and this job was next on the owners to do list. The dash, instruments & controls, steering wheel and timber veneer are all in good condition. This car retains an electronic versionof the original Becker Mexico radio (with an iPhone connection) which is a nice touch. The heart of any Ferrari is under the bonnet and the engine bay is just about as good as it gets on this car. The cars current owner can only be described as fastidious and he has painstakingly restored the engine bay to as close to how it was when the car rolled off the production line in Maranello all those years ago. The work carried out in the engine bay included: carburettors overhauled and restored to as built condition, the distributors were overhauled to as new condition and re-mapped, the distributor gear drives overhauled and restored, correct HT leads and lead brackets fitted, acorn nuts for the cam covers and correct metric fasteners fitted where required and the crackle finish was restored on the cam covers, air filter boxes, condensate canister and steel tubes. Everything is like new. Make no mistake this car is not just about the show! Whilst this car looks the goods it really gets exciting when you slip in behind the wheel . . . it has plenty of go! Prime the Webers, turn the key and the 4.4 litre V12 engine bursts into life. It starts easily and idles smoothly from the get-go. Buckle up and away you go . . . on the move, you realise that the car is really tight on the road with no rattles or squeaks. Like all Ferraris, it gets better and better as it warms up. It steers, handles and stops as you would expect. The gearbox is firm and the synchros are good, including second, even when cold. This car has power on tap in spades! The big V12 revs willingly and the car pulls strongly through the rev range. The oil pressure is good and the engine sounds just right. The air conditioning works and the car is fitted with period-correct Michelin XWX radial tyres and correct Koni shock absorbers, including the often replaced load levellers. The cars third and very long term owner has confirmed that the current mileage of 114,310 miles would be genuine. In almost six years of ownership this Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2 has travelled only 5,500 miles. It is regularly seen at Ferrari Club events, various Cars & Coffee events as well as other car shows. This car was the recipient of a Gold Award at the last Ferrari Concours dElegance held in Brisbane. This Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2 ticks all the boxes. Highlights: - an Australian delivered, factory RHD example. - finished in a popular colour scheme of red with a beige interior. - this is a well sorted example that is ready to be used and enjoyed. - it has Ferrari Classiche certification, books, known history from new, a history file - dating back to 1994, a diary on the car from 2014 and a correct jack kit. The Ferrari 365 GT/4 2+2 has to be the last of the relatively affordable classic front engined V12 Ferraris and this example now needs a new owner to use and enjoy it! Price $155,000.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1090589
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 1,971

The Bristol Car Company has a rich and fascinating history. Its origins date back to the Bristol Aeroplane Company (formerly The British and Colonial Aeroplane Company) that was founded in February 1910 by Sir George White, chairman of the Bristol Tramways and Carriage Company, along with his son Stanley and his brother Samuel, to commercially exploit the fast-growing aviation sector. The Bristol Aeroplane Company developed into a British industrial powerhouse and they built some of the worlds most technologically advanced aeroplanes. Some of the most well-known and successful aircraft built by Bristol were the Bristol F2 Fighter (used during World War I), the Bristol Bulldog and the Bristol Beaufighter (used during World War II). Following the First World War the British aircraft industry suffered a dramatic downturn and subsequently significant financial challenges. In an endeavour to keep its workforce employed the Bristol Aeroplane Company undertook the manufacture of a light car, the single seat Bristol Monocar which was powered by a motorcycle engine, the construction of car bodies for Armstrong Siddeley and bus bodies for their sister company, Bristol Tramways. The company survived, but times were tough. Aircraft manufacturing ramped up again with the outbreak of the Second World War, however, management had learned that they must plan for the future. It is understood that discussions started as early as 1941 to establish a post war car manufacturing division. Bristol began working with AFN Ltd, makers of Frazer Nash cars and British importer of BMWs before the war, on plans for a joint venture in automotive manufacturing. What ultimately eventuated was that the Bristol Aeroplane Company took over AFN Ltd and established its car manufacturing division, Bristol Cars. A purpose built factory was constructed at Filton Aerodrome, near Bristol. The first Bristol was designated the 400 and not surprisingly given the Frazer Nash and BMW connection it was based on a BMW 326 chassis with BMW 327 styling. The engine, whilst built by Bristol, was also based on a BMW 327. The first prototypes were built in late 1946, however, the car was formally introduced at the 1947 Geneva Motor Show. The car was a great success for Bristol and almost 500 examples were built through until 1950. This included 17 Drophead Coupes with coachwork by Pininfarina. In 1949 Bristol introduced the 401, which was designed and bodied by Touring of Milan in Italy. The new model was aerodynamically sleeker and featured superleggera construction with an aluminium body over a steel frame. As a result the car weighed significantly less and its performance was greatly enhanced. Bristol was gaining a reputation for building technologically advanced motor cars that were luxurious, very reliable and offered genuinely exciting performance on the road. Their cars were not cheap andas a result they remained somewhat exclusive. Buyers of new Bristols back in the day were typically wealthy businessman who wanted a car to stand out in a crowd. They also wanted a car they could drive and enjoy and many Bristols were used for hill climbs and weekend motor racing. Bristol developed the 450 specifically for motor racing and it made its debut at the 1953 Le Mans 24 hour race. Two cars were entered in the race, however, they both retired with engine failures after about 10 hours. Bristol returned to Le Mans in 1954 and entered three cars, with uprated engines and improved aerodynamic bodywork. In contrast with the previous year all three cars finished the race, coming home in first, second and third place in their class and seventh, eighth and ninth overall. Their performance also earned Bristol the team prize. Bristol returned to Le Mans again in 1955 and again performed exceptionally well achieving the same results as in 1954. The race became famous for the wrong reason when a major accident resulted in debris flying into the crowd killing 83 people and injuring many more. Following this race a number of manufacturers, including Bristol, retired from motor racing indefinitely. Subsequent road cars included the 403 (1953-1955, 287 cars built), which was a further development of its predecessors, the 404 (1953-1958, 52 cars built), the 405 (1953-1958, 308 cars built and the 406 (1958-1961, 174 cars built). Bristol Cars was sold after its parent company joined with other British aircraft companies in 1960 to create the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC), which later became part of British Aerospace. In 1953 Bristol introduced the two door 404 and four door 405. For these models Bristol abandoned the BMW style radiator grille for a style that reflected its aviation heritage. A unique design feature of the 404 and 405 is the sizable lockers in the front wings accessed externally by gullwing doors. On a right hand drive car, the locker on the drivers side held the spare wheel and jack, whilst that on the passengers side housed the battery and fuse panel. These cars also had upgraded engine performance, an improved gearbox with a short gear lever and front disc brakes as an option. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1955 Bristol 405 Sports Saloon. The original build sheet on file confirms that this car was ordered on the 01/10/54 by Parrs (Leicestershire) Limited from Abbey Lane in Leicestershire in the UK as a demonstrator. The estimated date of despatch was noted as 18/02/55. The original colour scheme is noted as chinese ivory with black upholstery and gold wheels. The car was originally registered as MJF2. The factory Car Service Record on file notes a disc brake conversion on the 16/10/58 at 15,847 miles. There is also a document on file summarising its history. The cars first owner was Frank Newton Bott from Linwood just outside Glasgow in Scotland. Bott immigrated to Australia in the 1960s, bringing the car with him. He moved to Perth in Western Australia and the car was registered as URN 640. Bott sold the car in September 1968 to Reg Blewett who also lived in Perth. Over the next 35 years, the car changed hands a few times, initially staying in Perth then moving east to Melbourne and later Bendigo. The cars current owner, who is very well known in the Bristol community in Australia, purchased it in 2003 from Colin Kennedy in Bendigo. This Bristol 405 was a little tired when he purchased it and in 2008 he had the body stripped to bare metal and repainted in its current colour scheme of navy blue with a silver roof. There are some photos on file of this work. The body was found to be very good, apart from some corrosion around the front indicators. Some woodwork was replaced around the rear window. This and a few other imperfections were expertly repaired by a gentleman at the Caboolture airport, where he was restoring vintage aeroplanes. The panel gaps are generally very good for a hand built car. The current owner is a driver and not a polisher, so therefore his cars get used! Today this car presents very well, but it is not a show car. The paint is in good condition as is all of the external trim. Unfortunately, someone has reversed into the car and hit it with what looks to be a tow ball. There is a slight dent in the front bumper which has also pushed back and caused minor damage to the body. The damage is not obvious, but it is there. The wheels are in good condition and shod with (older) Falken 175/80R16 tyres all round. The interior was retrimmed back in 2008 and it still presents nicely today. There are no rips or tears to the upholstery and even the carpets are in good condition. The timberwork is also in good condition, but it would benefit from a sand and polish. There looks to have been large speakers previously mounted on the rear parcel shelf which have left some marks. The rear quarter windows are both missing their latches. The engine was rebuilt back in 2008 and the car would have travelled less than 10,000 miles since then. The car runs and drives exceptionally well and anyone in the know appreciates that the engine and gearbox are both a feature on these early Bristols! This car has a wonderful exhaust note and the engine sounds just fabulous. These cars were well ahead of their time and this example proves just that. Its hard to believe that this is a 65 year old car! Whilst the driving position is typically 1950s British, you do feel comfortable behind the wheel. The steering wheel itself is quite large in diameter. It is similar to a period Aston Martin and designed to give the driver the ability to easily manoeuvre the car whilst driving with some gusto! Out on the open road this car performs exceptionally well. Its current owner has driven it to rallies right across the country where it has always performed with aplomb. The car has factory overdrive which makes it a comfortable cruiser at motorway speed. Did we mention the engine and gearbox . . . fantastic! The documentation on file notes that the car has had an engine change very early in its life, possibly before being sold to its first owner. The engine in the car is the correct engine type, with the suffix 100B. Today the odometer reads circa 87,500 miles. Accompanying the car is the original build sheet, some Bristol historical documents & club records of ownership, restoration photos from 2008, a spare wheel/tyre and jack. The following quote from British Autocar magazine (8th October 1954) sums up the Bristol 405 very well . . . . a close examination of both the mechanical components and the bodywork indicates that the manufacturers of this streamlined sports saloon are out to produce a vehicle that is as good as the best. Highlights: - A rare and exclusive 1950s British classic. - 1 of only 308 examples built. - Well presented in a colour scheme that perfectly suits the car. - Mechanically sorted and ready to use. Price $104,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1098840
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,344

The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful, though their cars had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. The SS100 built between 1936 and 1941 is today regarded as one of the great pre-war sports cars, however, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The XK120 morphed into the XK140 and ultimately the XK150 and in total, just over 30,000 cars were built over 15 years of production. In 1961, at the Geneva Motor Show, Jaguar introduced the E-Type, which like the XK120 all those years ago, took the motoring world by storm. The body styling was simply gorgeous and technologically the E-Type was an engineering masterpiece and it set new standards in all areas. Whilst automotive styling is somewhat subjective the E-Type is often ranked atop lists of the most beautiful cars and in fact it has been described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made. And its not just about the looks as the E-Type is often at the top of other lists such as the best sports car ever built or the most significant cars. It is truly a motoring icon. As a testament to the success of the E-Type, production evolved through three series from 1961 until 1974 during which time circa 70,000 cars were built. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a factory right hand drive 1971 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 V12 2+2. The Jaguar Heritage Certificate confirms this factory RHD example was manufactured on the 20th October 1971 with a date of dispatch of 9th November 1971. The original distributor is noted as Rossleigh from Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland in the UK. They are also noted as the original dealer. The cars original colour scheme was regency red with a beige interior. The first owner is noted as PR Bloom (Kannybuy) Ltd, and the car was originally registered as FTN 354 K which was issued in Newcastle upon Tyne. The cars subsequent early UK history is not known. It is understood that the car found its way to Perth in Western Australia quite early in its life. What is known is that the cars long term owner traded it on a Rolls-Royce with David Ekberg in Melbourne in 2016. At some stage in Perth the car looks to have been restored, at which time it was repainted in signal red and the interior retrimmed in black. The car then sold to its current Melbourne based owner. Shortly after acquiring the car, he took it to respected Jaguar specialist Mike Roddy to have it serviced. At that time the clutch was replaced, all cooling hoses were replaced and the car was tuned. He has enjoyed this Jaguar E-Type ever since, whilst continuing to maintain the car. Unfortunately, due to a change in his circumstances the car is now offered for sale. Today this Jaguar E-Type presents and drives really well. The older restoration has stood the test of time. The red paintwork remains in very good condition with a high gloss and a strong depth of colour. On closer inspection there are a few minor defects and stone chips, but they are all relatively minor. All of the exterior trim, the chrome and the glass are in good condition. The only exception is that there is some light pitting on both small chrome trim pieces that sit behind the doors. The car is fitted with a sliding Webasto style sunroof with wind deflector the works well and is in very good condition. We love that this car is running the traditional Jaguar hub caps, which we think suit this model perfectly, giving it somewhat of a distinguished look. The hub caps are in good condition covering traditional steel wheels shod with Hancook Kinergy EX 205/70R15 tyres all round. The panel gaps on this car are good and the car is clean underneath. Inside the cabin the interior presents exceptionally well with just the right amount of patina. The upholstery is just lovely and presents like your favourite leather jacket. There are no rips, tears or damage to the seats, centre console or the door cards. Whilst the seats are supportive the foam is showing signs of age and starting to soften. You quickly notice that the instruments and controls are in excellent condition all round. All the instruments are crisp and clean and in working order. The rocker switches are often a weak point on these E-Types. The switch surrounds are often cracked or broken and the labelling often worn . . . but not on this car, they are all in excellent condition. The dash is in very good condition with no cracks or splits and the carpets show minimal wear. In summary, the cabin of this Jaguar E-Type is just a delightful place to be. So after admiring the cabin it is time to see what this E-Type is really all about! As with all E-Types you need to pull out the choke to start from cold. You then turn the key and the big V12 bursts into life. It warms quickly and you are able to back the choke off almost immediately. Whats immediately apparent is that the engine sounds fantastic and it is really smooth. Out on the road this Jaguar E-Type drives exactly how you would expect it to. The power steering and relatively light controls make this a very easy car to drive, even in traffic. This car is a fabulous cruiser and just goes about its business in the most refined and sophisticated way. That said when the road opens up and you plant your right foot, you know you have a 5.3 litre V12 engine with around 272 hp on tap if you need it. Driven a little harder than normal the V12 starts to growl and it definitely has an edge to it. This car stops, steers and handles as you would expect. We understand the car has not been used in recent times and we have found the more it gets driven the better it gets. The price of Jaguar E-Types has sky rocketed in recent years and the often maligned 2+2 model remains relatively affordable when compared to the roadster and coupe. The Series 3 is definitely the best proportioned of the Jaguar E-Type 2+2s and they are one of the most practical classic cars money can buy. We like the refined nature of the Series 3 with the V12 engine and with the desirable manual gearbox they are still very much a drivers car. Highlights: a UK delivered, factory RHD example. matching numbers engine, gearbox and chassis as confirmed by the Heritage Certificate. desirable manual gearbox. finished in a fabulous colour scheme of signal red with a black interior. a well-presented car in very good condition. jack and toolkit Jaguar Heritage Certificate, owners manual, workshop manual and some service receipts / documentation. Price $149,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1052271
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4

The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful; though they had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. Whilst the SS100 is indeed a fabulous car, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The XK120 morphed into the XK140 and ultimately the XK150 and in total, just over 30,000 cars were built over fifteen years of production. Jaguar introduced the E-Type at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, which like the XK120 all those years ago, took the motoring world by storm. The body styling was simply gorgeous and technologically the E-Type was an engineering masterpiece and it set new standards in all areas. Whilst automotive styling is somewhat subjective the E-Type is often ranked atop lists of the most beautiful cars and in fact, it has been described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made. Jaguar could build sports cars but they were also very successful at building sports saloons. In 1955 the Jaguar Mk1 was introduced to fill a gap in the model range of a small to medium sized luxury saloon. Initially introduced with a 2.4 litre 6 cylinder engine and later a 3.4 litre 6 cylinder engine this model was very successful with some 38,000 examples sold between 1955 and 1959. In 1959 the Mk2 was introduced and whilst visually similar at first glance the new car had many improvements over its predecessor. In addition to the 2.4 litre and 3.4 litre engines the Mk2 was also offered with a 3.8 litre engine as used in the E-Type. Just over 80,000 Mk2s were built from 1959 to 1967. The Mk2 was to be replaced by the XJ6, however, delays with this car resulted in Jaguar producing another series of the Mk2 which was designated as the 240 and 340 to fall into line with the nomenclature used with other models on offer at the time, specifically the 420. The 240 and 340 were built from 1967 to 1969 andalmost 4,500 and 2,800 respectively of each model were built. The Jaguar Mk2 was also very successful on the race track winning events all over the world. One of the most successful teams was UK based John Coombs, who also developed a business selling Jaguar Mk2s upgraded with Coombs modifications. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1967 Jaguar Mk2 Coombs Tribute. This particular car is a factory right hand drive Jaguar 240 that has been upgraded with a number of Coombs modifications, including a 4.2 litre Jaguar engine. The early history of this car is not known, however, it is understood to have been a long term Queensland car. The car was registered in Queensland as 398 LHP. It was owned by an ex Leyland/Jaguar mechanic for many years and he passed the car down to his son. It was sold through the Classic Car Garage in Caloundra on the Sunshine Coast in April 2011 to its next owner in Gympie who decided to upgrade the car with a number of Coombs modifications, including a Daimler 4.2 litre engine. The car was purchased by Jeremy Bests Cummins Classic Cars in Sydney who decided to go the full monty with the car undertaking further Coombs modifications. The decided to fit a 4.2 litre Jaguar engine that was rebuilt for one of Ian Cummins Jaguar E-Type race cars, but never used. The modifications and upgrades which make this car a very special Jaguar Mk2 include: - Race prepared 4.2 litre engine - Rob Beere billet alloy oil pump - Scorcher/Petronix ignition - Power-Lite starter motor - Uprated electric fuel pump and pressure regulator - 2 x 2 inch HD8 carburettors with alloy air trumpets and alloy air spreader copied from originals and sourced from Coombs engineer Ken Bell - Alloy radiator and electric cooling fan - 5 speed Getrag 260 gearbox (from a BMW) with overdrive 5th gear - Solid front cross member mounts - Uprated front sway bar - 30% stiffer front springs - Super-Pro suspension bushes - Koni dampers front and rear - 4 pot brake calipers with ventilated discs - Alloy cold air ducting for front brakes - Goodridge steel braided flexible brake lines - EZ electric power steering - D type gear knob - Coombes replica exhaust in stainless steel - Genuine Minilite knock on mag wheels - Period correct leather trimmed bucket seats - Louvred bonnet - Momo steering wheel - Various period correct stickers including Coombs dealer rear window sticker The engine was built up by Graeme Lord Engineering with Argo con rods, special 9.5 to 1 pistons, E-Type inlet manifold, E-Type camshafts, large volume oil pump with special flaps in the sump to help with oil surge, extractor exhaust fitted to a gas flowed big valve cylinder head with 3x 2 inch S.U carburettors giving 325 BHP at 5,800 rpm. When the engine was installed into this car it was done with a dual carburettor setup, most likely to get it to fit! Today this car presents pretty well, but it is all about the drive! When you approach the car the louvred bonnet and knock on Minilite wheels are the first giveaway that this is no ordinary Jaguar Mk2! You open the door, slide into bucket seat, get comfortable and then with great anticipation fire up the engine. Theres no doubt it means business! It has an edge for sure, but it is still relatively refined given its specifications. Immediately after getting mobile you appreciate the EZ power steering which make the car incredibly light on the road and easy to drive. The Getrag gearbox is firm and it is well suited to the car. Not surprisingly the engine has loads of power on tap and it is so incredibly responsive. The car handles and stops as you would expect. Make no mistake this car is quick . . . it is one heck of a drivers car! From say a meter the car presents well, but it is no trailer queen and on closer inspection, there are a number of stone chips and small blemishes in the paint evident. The most noticeable are some scratches on the left rear guard, adjacent to the boot. The panel gaps are pretty good and the car is clean underneath. The boot looks to be very original and whilst it is showing some wear there is no sign of any rust. All of the external trim, chrome, lights/lenses and the glass are in very good condition. The Mk2 enthusiasts will note that the slimline Jaguar 240/340 bumpers have been replaced with the traditional Mk2 bumpers without overriders. The condition of the interior of the car is comparable to the exterior. It is clean and tidy. The feature of the interior is the steering wheel and bucket seats, which like the bonnet louvres and Minilite wheels reinforce that this is no ordinary Jaguar Mk2! The upholstery is in good condition and there are no rips or tears in the seats. The door cards are clean, though they are starting to sag. The timber is clean with no cracks evident, though the dash is starting to show its age and it would benefit from a refurbish. All of the instruments and controls are also in good condition and everything looks to be in working order. The car was fitted with new Dunlop CR65 tyres in January 2018. Accompanying the car is a recent history file, documentation pertaining to the engine build back in 2003, a spare set of wire wheels, a spare wheel in the car, tool kit, hammer and jack. Its time for the ultimate game of cops and robbers! Price $79,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1087759
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,929

The Lamborghini story is fascinating in itself but for the company to have survived all these years and indeed celebrate its 50th Anniversary in 2013 is quite amazing. Ferruccio Lamborghini was an entrepreneur, a very successful businessman and a lover of the finer things in life, including sports cars. He was fortunate enough to own some wonderful cars including Ferraris however, he found fault with them all. According to the legend following a meeting with Enzo Ferrari to discuss some of the short comings of his cars Enzo dismissed Ferruccio and he subsequently decided that he could build a better car. Not long after, in May 1963, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SPA was established and the small town of Sant'Agata Bolognese, located between Modena and Bologna, was chosen as the location to build the factory. Born under the Zodiac sign Taurus Lamborghini chose the raging bull as the emblem for his sports cars. Lamborghini knew what he wanted and he put together a highly skilled team. His first car, the 350 GTV was shown at the Turin Motor Show in October 1963. This car received mixed reviews, however, Lamborghini was not deterred and made a number of improvements and design changes to this original concept. The first Lamborghini production car, the 350 GT, left the factory in mid 1964. The 350 GT evolved into the 400 GT 2+2 and later the Islero. In parallel to building these classic front engine V12 GT cars Lamborghini wanted to build a super car, enter the Miura first shown as a rolling chassis in 1965, and also a GT car that could comfortably seat four people, enter the Espada in 1968. The mid to late sixties were good times for Lamborghini and his cars were revered the world over. One of Lamborghinis biggest markets was the USA and he needed to redesign the Islero to comply with strict new design rules. Ferruccio decided to commission a new car and so the Jarama (pronounced Yah-rah-mah) was born. Named after a district in Spain renowned for breeding fighting bulls the Jarama was first shown at the 1970 Geneva Motor Show. The car designed by Bertones Marcello Gandini was unique but compared to many other Lamborghinis quite subtle or even understated in its design, which is exactly what Lamborghini wanted. According to the numbers only 327 Jaramas were built. Of these, 177 were the 'standard' Jarama produced from 1970 to 1972 and 150 were the Jarama S produced from 1972 to 1975, though many completed cars were sold post 1975. It is understood that circa 23 right hand drive cars were built, comprising of 5 Jaramas and 18 Jarama S (or GTS). Of the 5 right hand drive Jaramas built, 2 were UK delivered, 2 Singapore delivered and the other was Australian delivered. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this spectacular and extremely rare right hand drive Lamborghini Jarama. The factory records confirm this car was completed on the 6th August 1971 and delivered to Lamborghini London. The car is noted as being 'rosso alfa' (red) with a 'nero' (black) interior. It was delivered new with air conditioning. Whilst this car is 1 of the 2 UK delivered right hand drive Jaramas, it was purchased new in the UK by an Australian, Graeme Cook, who imported it here in late 1971. The current Victorian Registration documents note that the car was complianced in 01/1972. Cook owned the car a short time then sold it to Michael Abon, an owner of BP service stations in Melbourne. The current owner first acquired this Lamborghini Jarama in 1975. At that time he purchased the car from Chris Smith, who was a car broker, sports car / historic race driver and motor racing commentator. Smith was understood to have owned the car for some 18 months. The car was enjoyed for 5 years before it was sold in 1980 to Lutz Frankenfeld, a Darwin based businessman who drove the car from Melbourne to Adelaide before transporting it to Darwin. Frankenfeld owned the car for almost 10 years. There are two period photos of the car on file taken at prestige car dealer Oxford Allenby Motors in Perth in the late 1980's, which would have been when Frankenfeld sold the car. At that time the odometer was c55,000 miles. Fast track to 2004 and the owner of this Lamborghini Jarama from 1975 to 1980 bought his old car back. Hed always regretted selling this car and after several years of looking, it turned up in Perth at the Motor Museum of Western Australia. The car had been in continuous ownership for 15 or so years. Its then owner passed away and his family had the car displayed at the Motor Museum of Western Australia. At that time the car was registered as 1BUF012 (WA). This car is well travelled and Ferruccio would have been well pleased that it has been used and enjoyed throughout its life. In 2009 the engine was rebuilt by Lamborghini specialist Paul Placzek from Sports & Classic Car Services in Melbourne. At that time the odometer was 97,957 miles. This is a well known car in Melbourne and it is often seen on various classic Italian car rallies and other events. It has averaged around 1,000 miles per annum since the engine was rebuilt and the odometer today reads 07993 (107,993) miles. The car has just been repainted in its original colour by classic and prestige car specialists Luxury Auto Body in Melbourne. As a result, the car presents today like new. We love the look of the Jarama in red which is beautifully contrasted by the subtle chrome work and black accents. The Miura style knock off wheels, which are a real feature of the Jarama and a preferred look to the bolt on wheels of the Jarama S, are in beautiful condition with no scrapes or wheel rash evident. All of the chrome, other external trim, lights/lenses and the glass are in very good condition. The cabin in a Jarama is arguably the most comfortable of all the classic Lamborghinis. Visibility is excellent and the seats are quite luxurious. The interior of this car is finished in its original black and it provides a lovely contrast to the red paint work. All of the leather is in excellent condition and there are no rips, tears or splits to any of the upholstery. The timber steering wheel and gear knob are a feature and both are in excellent condition on this car. All of the instruments and controls are in working order and the (upgraded) air conditioning even blows cold air. On a recent test drive, this car performed every bit as good as it looks. Like most big V12 Lamborghinis this Jarama needs plenty of fuel sucked into the carburettors to get the engine started. Once it fires the engine quickly settled into a smooth idle. This car has been upgraded with electronic ignition which has probably helped with the smoothness of its running, particularly when cold. What became immediately apparent was that this car was unfussed nudging in and around busy Melbourne traffic. The gearbox is smooth from cold and there is no need to be apprehensive selecting second gear. This car is fully sorted and an absolute joy to drive. It really finds its head once out on the motorway and put simply it just wants to go. A break in traffic opens up and the car just takes off. Lamborghinis 3929cc V12 is an absolute jewel and the engine in this car has loads of power on tap and it revs willingly through the rev range without any hesitation at all. The brakes are more than adequate and pullthe car up effortlessly in a straight line. The handling is balanced and the steering is direct. Interestingly, the feel is quite different to an Espada which has a slightly longer wheelbase. The Jarama was a favourite of Ferruccio Lamborghini. To quote him from the January 1991 issue of Thoroughbred & Classic Cars . . . I preferred the Jarama to all the others, because it is the perfect compromise between the Miura and the Espada. The Miura is a sports car for the young at heart who wants to go like hell and love to be seen. Myself, I considered the Miura too extrovert after a while. In turn, the Espada was my Rolls Royce . . . still quite fast, but also large and comfortable. The Jarama is the perfect car if you just want to have one car. The Miura and Countach are the best known classic Lamborghinis, however, the front engine V12 cars have now developed strong interest from collectors and enthusiasts all over the world. The early 350 GT / 400 GT 2+2s and even the Islero have taken off in terms of price and the Jarama has slept quietly in their shadows. The secret is out, however, and the Jarama is now becoming sought after and prices are on the rise. Its best competitor from across town at Maranello would be the Ferrari 365 GTC/4 and the Jarama offers great value, is every bit as good to drive (if not better!) and it is a lot rarer compared to the C4. The car is confirmed as matching numbers. It has a correct spare wheel but no tool/jack kit. There are service receipts on file dating back to 2005, an original owners manual, an Espada/Jarama engine manual (copy), parts manual (copy), original sales brochures and other literature that will accompany the car. The owner has decided it is time to down size his collection. As noted above, this car has just been repainted and he has therefore decided it is probably the right time to sell. Highlights: - 1 of only 5 factory right hand drive Lamborghini Jaramas built. - A beautifully presented car that is absolutely fantastic to drive. - Recently repainted and only 10,000 miles since the engine was rebuilt. - A well known, well maintained car with a known history from new. Price - $349,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1040073
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,781

Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1964 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight.

CALL 07 3171 1953
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