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Showing all items for OLDTIMER GARAGE AUSTRALIA P/L

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  • RefCode: TA1178754
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,442

1956 Jaguar XK140 Fixed Head Coupe

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1176521
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,275

1968 Morris Cooper S

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1193462
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,235

1967 Jaguar E-Type Series 1 2+2

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1193775
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,585

1979 Volkswagen Beetle Cabriolet by Karmann

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1205421
  • Body Type: Ute
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,997

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale an Australian delivered 1958 Land Rover Series 1 109 Truck Cab Utility. There is a British Motors Industry Heritage Trust certificate on file which confirms that this particular example was dispatched as a CKD (complete knock down) car from the factory on 27th March 1958. Its destination was Regent Motors Limited in Melbourne and it was assembled by the Pressed Metals Corporation Limited in Sydney. The certificate also confirms this car was delivered with a 2 litre petrol engine. The current owner acquired this Land Rover in April 2019 through the Series One Shop in Newry, Victoria. The car belonged to a Victorian property owner and was described as matching numbers car with a genuine 50, 600 miles, original wiring and lights, no holes drilled in the bulkhead, no rust anywhere, engine runs beautifully without any tap or click and pulls strongly up hill and down dale, gearbox, transfer case and 4WD selector all work perfect, body work in excellent condition, rare 109 rear power take-off fitted with the correct selector, drive shafts and centre bearing. At that time the car was registered in Victoria with the registration ORR 302. There are photos on file of the Land Rover when the current owner acquired it and these clearly show this is a car that has been looked after by its previous owner. The current owner is very fussy and when he acquired the car there were a few small things he did not like. In particular, there was a nasty scrape on the passenger side of the car, probably caused by a farm gate and at some stage indicators were added on the front guards, similar to what one would see on a Land Rover Series 2. What started out as a simple job to tidy up a few things quickly resulted in a far more comprehensive one. He soon decided to restore the car! The tray, doors, floor, roof, front guards and front of the car were all removed from the chassis and prepared for a repaint. The current owner was fortunate enough to have access to a spray booth through his business and everything was repainted in dove grey. There are photos on file of the work done. At the same time the car was given a complete mechanical overhaul. The engine, gearbox, transfer case, differential, radiator and the starter motor were all reconditioned. The following new components were sourced and installed: a water pump, shock absorbers, suspension bushes, exhaust, brakes and brake lines. The owner also installed a new wiring loom and a new set of tyres were fitted Inside the cabin, a set of new Exmoor seats were fitted, the steering wheel was refurbished, a new steering switch for the indicators was installed and other miscellaneous items were either refurbished or replaced. Where possible, all genuine Land Rover parts were used for the restoration. The project was completed in mid-2022 and the car was subsequently registered in Queensland. The end result is simply magnificent. This Land Rover presents essentially like the day it was assembled by the Pressed Metals Corporation Limited in Sydney back in 1958! This Land Rover can be configured in different ways as it is truly a multifunctional vehicle. It can be used as shown in the photos with a steel truck cab style roof over the cabin and the open tray. There is a canvas canopy to cover the tray. The truck cab style roof can be removed and a full length canvas roof, which expands all the way from the front wind screen to the rear of the tray, can be fitted giving it that safari look. There is also a separate windscreen with the car which, when installed, can be folded down over the bonnet. As we mentioned before, the presentation of this Land Rover is simply magnificent. It would not be out of place in a Land Rover showroom today next to its more modern brothers and sisters. Today the odometer reads 61, 764 miles. This Land Rover certainly makes an impression when you walk up to it. The body work is in excellent condition and the paint work, which is only three years old, presents exceptionally well. The external trim is minimalistic and it all presents similarly well. The windows are a combination of glass and Perspex. The glass is all in good condition, though the Perspex windows are showing some scratches and sign of wear. The steel wheels are in excellent condition with no sign of any curb rash or damage. They are shod with Dunlop SP Road Gripper tyres, size 7. 50R16 and they are date stamped 4019 (week 40, 2019). Not surprisingly, the tyres are in excellent condition as the car has been used sparingly since it was restored. Inside the cabin everything looks fresh. As one would expect in a Land Rover it is all very basic. The seats are new and firm. Aftermarket seat belts have been fitted for safety and there are new mats on the floor. The instruments are clear and appear to be in good working order. The steering wheel has been refurbished and is in excellent condition. For our photo shoot we fitted the short canvas top on the car and that can be done with relative ease. It is a good fit and the canvas is in very good condition. The long canvas cover is also in good condition with just some minor discolouration. We did notice a small tear (approx 1cm) on the rear flap. The rear tray has new rubber mats to protect the paint. The car starts easily, though it does require the use of the choke when the engine is cold. The engine settles into a smooth idle fairly quickly but performs best when it has warmed up. The gearbox has synchro on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear when shifting up, and only 4th and 3rd on the down shift. As a result, this Land Rover is for real drivers, but you soon get the hang of it. Out on the road this Land Rover just goes about its business. The engine revs freely and performs well. The gearbox, whilst maybe a little bit agricultural, does what it is supposed to do and once you get the hang of it the gear changes are relatively smooth. The gearbox sound good and there is no wining from the gears. We decided against going off-road on our test drive, but we did test the four-wheel drive system and it works flawlessly. The transfer case engages and disengages the four-wheel drive system exactly the way it should. This car is fitted with a PTO at the rear, which we understand to be in working condition. Accompanying the car is a short canvas cover, a long canvas cover, a second wind screen (which you need when you fit the long canvas cover on the car), all the hardware needed, both for the short canvas cover and the long canvas cover and a Land Rover Series 1 instruction manual. There is also a spare wheel mounted on the bonnet, which can be easily removed. These Land Rovers are obviously very functional for their intended purpose, but like micro cars they are now highly collectable classic cars. This one is fabulous! Highlights: - Recently refurbished Australian delivered late series Land Rover Series 1 109 Truck Cab Utility. - Comes with truck cab, short canvas cover and long canvas cover. - Recent restoration. - Very well presented. - Ready to be used and enjoyed. Price: $89, 950 Background: One of the fundamental principles of economics is the law of supply and demand. During World War II the US army had a need for a light 4WD vehicle capable of carrying troops as well as cargo. And so the Jeep was born. From 1941 through until 1945 Willys and Ford were the major supplier of Jeeps, in various configurations, to the US military and their allies. The history of the Rover Company dates back to the mid 1800s when it was selling sewing machines and then safety tricycles and bicycles. By the 1930s, it had evolved into a car company but was hit badly by the Great Depression. In common with many British industrial companies during World War II, its factories were turned over to the war effort and produced engines for tanks and aircraft. By 1945 and the end of World War II, Rover found itself with two excellent factories and a highly skilled workforce. It was looking at restarting car production and had ambitious plans to build 20, 000 cars per year. A new model, the M-Type was dropped when it became clear that it would be unsuitable for export and that tooling costs would be excessive. Plans to produce 15, 000 of the pre-war designs per year were quickly quashed by the Government which refused to allocate steel for more than 1, 100 cars per year. This serious shortfall led Rover to realise that a stopgap solution was required until sufficientsteel was available. The stopgap also had to have export potential. Just to make things difficult, Rover had never exported any vehicles before! Maurice Wilks, Rovers head of design, had been using ex-army Jeeps on his farm and realising that there was no real alternative decided that Rover would provide one. The first prototype Land Rover, developed in late 1946, was actually built on Jeep chassis. The bodywork was made of an aluminium alloy called Birmabright. Using similar dimensions to the World War II Jeep, the first Land Rovers had an 80 wheelbase. The new Land Rover was first unveiled at the Amsterdam Motor Show on the 30th April 1948. It featured a steel box section chassis with an aluminium body and was powered by a 1. 6 litre, 4-cylinder Rover engine from the P3 Rover car range developing around 50 hp. The gearbox was four speed Rover mated to a two-speed transfer box thus allowing 4WD operation. A PTO (power take off) was also fitted to enable the Land Rover to be used as a stationary power unit. Rover didnt know what to expect but they need not have worried. The Land Rover was an outstanding success and the order books quickly overflowed. A legend was born! This humble Land Rover is in many ways the pioneer of the ubiquitous SUVs seen on our roads today.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1206189
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,087

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1933 MG K1 / K3 Magnette Conversion. According to documentation on file, this car started its life as an MG K1 four door pillarless saloon that was finished in black with a green interior. It was delivered to Duthrie & Sons, Montrose, Angus, Scotland on the 6th of November 1933. The car was then sold to the first owner, AM Wilkie, on the 11th of November of the same year. The first recorded UK road registration was SR8731. Subsequent UK owners are noted as C Garton 7/37, G Gardner 4/38, PJ Skegg 1956 and CP Shaw 1964. At some stage the car found its way to Australia. It was acquired in March 1990 by a well known MG enthusiast on the Gold Coast. The current owner acquired the car in 2000 as a rolling chassis and boxes of parts. It is understood that the previous owner shortened the chassis from a wheel base of 9.0 (2.74m) to a wheelbase of 7 10 (2.39m) to build a recreation of a K3 Magnette. The project appealed to the current owner who engaged the services of highly regarded vintage car specialists Historic and Vintage Restorations (HVR) in Melbourne Initially progress was slow as the owner was focussed on two other projects. In 2006 the MG project got some real traction. The chassis was rebuilt to K3 specifications with cruciform cross member added and then painted. The suspension has a split steering axle, retempered springs, new bushes & shackles, refurbished dampers, extra rear shockers, rebuilt & respoked wheels and rebuilt 13 aluminium drum brakes with hydraulics. The engine was totally rebuilt with many news parts, including the block, crankshaft, rods and pistons. The cylinder head had new valves, springs and inlet manifold. All the engine ancillaries, including the supercharger, water pump, generator and starter were completely rebuilt. A new exhaust system was also fabricated. The car features a close ratio preselector gearbox which was also totally rebuilt. The new body was built from scratch out of lightweight aluminium. The HVR team has done a magnificent job and the body has been beautifully handcrafted. It has been fitted with rebuilt original lights and instruments, aero screens, re-built original screen and wipers. The car has an original K3 (K3004) radiator and radiator cowl. A new wiring loom has been installed. The interior was reupholstered in red leather and the car painted in the most stunning shade of magenta. As one can imagine, this was a challenging project. A significant amount of research was undertaken to ensure the car was built as accurately and correctly as possible. By 2011 the project was finished and the car was ready for its first test drive. Over the next three years the car was fettled and continuously improved. At some stage the original supercharger was replaced with a modern supercharger. Today this fabulous MG presents and drives exceptionally well. It really does present like a recently restored car. The car is physically quite small, but despite that it has an incredible presence. The first thing you notice is the colour. At first glance from a distance the car looks black, however, when you get closer you realise this is not the case. It is finished in the most magnificent shade of dark purple or magenta and the colour really suits the car. The paintwork is still in very good condition and one has to look hard to find any defects. Over the years the paint has retained its strong depth of colour and a nice gloss finish. The chrome work is a real feature on this car and it is all in excellent condition. The exhaust is usually not something we would mention in our write up on a car but on this car it is a work of art. The satin black coating is in excellent condition as is the heat wrapping. The car is fitted with a normal wind screen as well as two aero screens. They are in excellent condition with no scratches or stone chips evident. The wire wheels are painted and in very good condition. There is no curb rash and all the spokes are in good condition. The wheels are shod with Excelsior Comp H tyres, size 5.00-19. The tyres are in excellent condition, however, they are date stamped 2904 (week 29, 2004) and therefore should be replaced based on age. There is also a spare wheel mounted on the back of the car which is shod with the same tyre. The interior is minimalistic yet businesslike as one would expect in what is essentially a race car. Everything remains fresh and is in excellent condition. The red leather seats hardly show any sign of wear and provide excellent support. The painted dashboard, whilst simple, is exactly what you would expect in a car like this. It is in excellent condition and all the instruments are clear and appear to be in good working condition. Even the dark grey carpets are in excellent condition. Another feature of the car is the exposed preselector gearbox. The MG K3 was most likely the first race car to use a preselector as part of its original specification. We were genuinely excited to take the car out for our test drive. Starting the car is relatively easy. The car is fitted with a battery isolator and therefore the first step is to make sure that is in the on position. There is a row of toggle switches on the left hand side of the dash. There is a switch for the ignition and a switch for the fuel pump, which need to be turned on. After waiting patiently for the pump to prime the carburettors you press the starter button. The engine fires up easily and it immediately becomes obvious that this car means business. Wow . . . what a noise! With a cold engine on start up you need to feather the throttle initially and it will then soon settle into a smooth idle. Then you get to the interesting part. Initially, it feels a bit strange to select a gear first and then press the clutch to engage the gear, but you do quickly get used to it. In fact once you get the hang of it, the preselector gearbox is an absolute delight. To be able to have both hands on the steering wheel when you change gears allows you to focus on just steering the car There is only one way to describe driving this car . . . FUN !!! It is an absolute blast and one of the best prewar cars we have ever driven. The engine might be small, but in combination with the supercharger and the fact that the car weighs nothing it is surprisingly fast. Pre-selector gearboxes are often criticised for being slow and at times awkward. On this car it was quite the opposite, the gear changes were smooth and without hesitation. Because of its size, this car feels like you are going faster than actually are, but make no mistake in the blink of an eye you will have exceeded the speed limit. Importantly the brakes are also up to the task and they pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. All too soon our test drive comes to and end and we have to return the car to our showroom. Between 1933 and 1934 MG only built 33 K3s. These cars were incredibly successful in period and as a result they are highly collectible, extremely valuable and tend to be tightly held today. Whilst the road going MG K1, 181 units built from 1932 to 1934 and K2, 20 units built from 1933 to 1934 are also very rare cars in their own right, many have been converted into K3s. Some of these conversions have been done very well and others less so. This car has to be one of the best and it is a credit to everyone who has been involved in its build. This car was displayed at Motorclassica in 2019, which is Australias leading concours delegance ancd classic car show. The car was extremely well received, which is a further testament to its quality. Accompanying the car is a short tonneau cover, a long tonneau cover, a car cover, a period correct toolkit and the original supercharger. There is also a thick file of receipts from the restoration as well as some historical documentation. Highlights: - An accurate, MG K1-based conversion mirroring one of the most successful sports racing cars of the 1930s. - Powered by a supercharged, overhead camshaft, inline, six cylinder engine paired with a preselector gearbox. - Built by renowned vintage car specialists, HVR in Melbourne. - Fabulous K3 alternative at a fraction of the cost. - Ideal for vintage races, rallies, hill climbs, and other thrilling events worldwide. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $329,950. Background: MG is one of the worlds most iconic motoring brands. The company started out as a side line business of Morris Garages, the Oxford agent for Morris cars, owned by William Morris. In 1921 Cecil Kimber joined the company as a Sales Manager and became General Manager in 1922. To promote sales Kimber started modifying standard Morris Oxfords. These so called Kimber Specials carried both the Morris as well and an MG badge. On the 1st May 1924 Morris Garages registered the MG Octagon as a trademark. Demand soon resulted in a move to a larger premises in September 1925. Quickly followed by another move in 1927. By 1928 the business had grown so much a decision was made to separate it from Morris and the M.G. Car Company was established in March 1928. In 1929 the company moved to Abingdon and on the 21st July 1930 the M.G. Car Company Limited was established;. The first cars to be produced under the name MG in 1924 were special bodied Morris Cowleys. The first MG to specifically compete in sporting events is a car now known as Old Number One. It was produced in 1925 and was first seen at the 1925 Lands End Trial. Other MG models followed quickly but in 1928 at the Motor Show at Olympia MG introduced the MG M-Type Midget, which became the first of many sports cars produced by MG and was a big success for the company. In that same year MG also introduced the MG 18/80. This was the first MG with a chassis designed and built by MG. The 18/80 was equipped with a six cylinder engine with a capacity of 2,468cc. By 1931 MG was looking for a car to fill the gap between the M-Type and the 18/80 and it introduced the F-Type Magna which was powered by a 1,271cc six cylinder engine. The F-type remained in production until 1932 when it was superseded by the K-Type. The K-Types were available in two chassis lengths. The K1, which was introduced in 1932 and had a wheelbase of 90 (2.74m) and the K2, which was introduced a short time later in 1933 had a wheelbase of 7 10 (2.39m). Both models were powered by a 1,087cc six cylinder engine. MG also produced a racing variant of the K-Type, the K3. It used a short chassis and was powered by a supercharged version of the 1,087cc six cylinder engine mated to a preselector gearbox. The K3 was very successful, wining its class at the 1933 Mille Miglia. Its greatest success came at the 1934 Le Mans 24 Hours when it finished 4th overall and won the Index of Performance, driven by Roy Eccles and Charlie Martin. Only 33 K3s were ever built making it one of the rarest and most desirable MGs.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1192060
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,474

2000 Ferrari 550 Maranello

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1155247
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,453

1937 Lagonda LG45 Drophead Coupe

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1209902
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 1,582

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale an absolutely delightful, Australian delivered, factory right hand drive 1959 Porsche 356 A 1600. There is a letter on file from Porsche, Germany dated 5th July 1990 confirming this car was manufactured in June 1959 and delivered new through Porsche dealer Hamilton in Australia. The car was delivered with the following specifications: colour: orange (paint code 711), interior: vinyl, optional equipment: green tinted windscreen, right hand drive, hub caps with badge, US bumpers and moldings. We can confirm that this car retains its original matching numbers engine. The early history of this car is not known. The story starts in 1983, when on the 26th August, ownership of this car transferred from Chris Katos to Andrew McRitchie. There is also a note on file confirming McRitchie purchased the car for the sum of $3,500. At that time the car was carrying the Victorian registration HEA111 but it was sold unregistered with the note it required extensive renovation. McRitchie decided to restore the car and what followed was an 8 year journey. Importantly, he meticulously documented everything he did. There is a 35 page document on file showing exactly what he did, when he did it and the number of hours he spend doing it! There is also a thick file of receipts. The project started in May 1984 and it was finally finished in October 1992. In total he spend 3,910 hours restoring his Porsche and as the document states, this didnt include the hours spend by brothers, sisters, father, friends, the paint shop, the machine shop and the time spend on collecting the necessary replacement parts! We have seen many good history files but rarely do we come across a write up as detailed as this. McRitchie was obviously a very detail minded, dedicated and meticulous owner. There is a Vic Roads Certificate of Roadworthiness on file, dated 7th March 1993, at which time the odometer read 45,922 miles. In December 2006 the current owner acquired the car from McRitchie. At that time the odometer read 49,521 miles. There is a valuation report on file from a week after he purchased the car which states: Vehicle fully restored from ground up, on inspection many restoration photos of the vehicle sighted also, Michelin 165×15 tyres, drivers side mirror, vehicle immaculate condition throughout. The previous owner had clearly cherished his car after he completed the restoration. The current owner is a real Porsche enthusiast and he has thoroughly enjoyed his 17+ years of ownership of this fabulous 356. He has used the car, travelling just over 22,000 miles in his ownership. The way the car presents today you would think it has travelled only 2,200 miles in his ownership! Today the odometer reads 68,861 miles. The car has been maintained and regularly serviced by well known and respected classic Porsche specialist McKernan Restoration in Kippa-Ring, Queensland. During one of these services it was noted that the split case gearbox in the car was in very poor condition and in November 2012 the decision was made to replace it with a period correct gearbox from a slightly later model 356A. To make the 356 more reliable and easier to start a electric fuel pump was fitted in January 2015. In September 2020 the carburettors were overhauled. The most recent service was executed in October 2023 and at that time the odometer read 68,030 miles. Today this car still presents exceptionally well. It has hard to believe that the restoration was completed some 30 years ago. The car is a credit to its current and previous owner, but particularly to the quality of the restoration. When you first see the car you are immediately charmed by its colour. The blue is truly striking and it really suits the car. It also contrasts perfectly with the tan interior. The paint on the car is generally in a very good condition. This car has been used as its makers intended by both its current and previous owner and as a result there is some light wear and tear evident. There are some stone chips and very small paint imperfections here and there, but you have to look. The glass on the car is all in excellent condition with no evidence of any cracks, though there are a few very small chips on the windscreen. All the external trim, including the lights and lenses are in good condition. The painted steel wheels are generally in good condition. There are a few small chips here and there and one or two marks that look to be from balancing weights that were previously fitted. The wheels are shod with Vredestein Sprint Classic tyres, size 165HR15, date stamped 0116 (week 1, 2016). The tyres are still in a good condition. Open the door and you are presented with a minimalistic, yet very good looking interior. First impressions are good. The seats present well with no cracks or tears in the leather. In the back you find two small seats which appear to have hardly been used, if at all, since the restoration. The door cards present well and even the carpets are in very good condition. The dashboard also presents well. In Australia, the top of the dashboard often gets affected by the harsh sun, but that is not the case here. All the instruments are crisp and clean. The engine bay presents well. It is neat, clean and tidy. The same can be said for the boot, where you will find the rubber mat, spare wheel and jack. Sliding in behind the wheel is like putting on your favourite old leather jacket. It just feels right! The seats are comfortable and still provide ample support. Everything you see is basic, yet that is exactly how you expect it to be. The steering wheel is in excellent condition and is a real feature on these cars. Once comfortable behind the wheel you ready to go. The starting procedure is simple. This car is fitted with an aftermarket fuel pump and a battery isolator. Switch both on, insert the key into the ignition and turn the ignition on. After allowing the fuel pump a little bit of time to fill the carburettor, turn the key further to start the car. This car still runs its original six volt electrical system and as a result you might think your battery is low on voltage when you crank the engine. However, that is normal and the engine starts easily, even from cold, and the car quickly settles into a smooth idle with that typical air cooled engine sound. After allowing the engine to warm up, select first gear and away you go! We were curious to see if this Porsche 356 would drive as good as it looks. Would we be disappointed? The short answer is no . . . it drives superbly! The engine sounds great and it pulls willingly through the rev range. The car just wants to go! The gearbox feels tight and the gear changes are precise and direct. The car feels solid on the road, the steering feels direct and the brakes pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. We did notice that the speedo waves a bit every now and then, especially when you accelerate from low speed. However, once you are at cruising speed it settles and indicates the correct speed. The oil temperature gauge is not working. This is a very well sorted Porsche 356 A that is just a lot of fun to drive. This is the type of car you can just get in, use and enjoy. There are a few small things one can do to further improve the car but nothing that requires immediate attention. Accompanying the car is a very good history file, including a detailed restoration dossier, some photographs, a Porsche letter confirming the cars provenance, a spare wheel and a jack. Highlights: - Australian delivered, factory RHD 356 A. - An older but high quality, meticulous restoration. - Great colour combination. - Matching numbers, engine and chassis. - Very well presented car, ready to use and enjoy. Price $259,950. Background: The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 aluminium bodied cars by hand in their small factory at Gmündbefore relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany in 1949. Instead of building the body of the car himself Porsche decided to collaborate with an old partner, the body manufacturing company Reutter who had both the expertise and infrastructure to mass produce the bodies for the 356 coupe and cabriolet. Nowadays, the first series of the 356, built from 1948 through until 1955 are known as the 356 Pre A. In 1955 the 356 A was introduced. The internal factory designation for this model was Type 1 which was quickly adapted by enthusiasts who referred to the 356 A as the T1. The 356 A became available as a coupe, cabriolet and a Speedster. Buyers had the choice between a 1,300cc and a 1,600cc engine and later the Super version. A second revision of the 356 A was introduced early in 1957. It became known as the Type 2 (or T2). Late 1958 the Speedster was replaced by the Convertible D which was now build by coachbuilder Drauz. Late 1959 the 356 A was replaced by the 356 B. The 356 remained in production through until 1965 and evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1152457
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,692

1965 Maserati Mistral

CALL 07 3171 1953
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