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Showing all items for OLDTIMER GARAGE AUSTRALIA P/L

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  • RefCode: TA1095674
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 2,496

1966 Mercedes-Benz 250SE Sedan

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1078037
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 6,223

1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA753617
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 998

1929 Morgan Super Sports Aero 3 Wheeler

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1073561
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 3,442

The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful; though they had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. Whilst the SS100 is indeed a fabulous car, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The XK120 morphed into the XK140 and ultimately the XK150 and in total, just over 30,000 cars were built over fifteen years of production. Jaguar introduced the E-Type at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, which like the XK120 all those years ago, took the motoring world by storm. The body styling was simply gorgeous, technologically the E-Type was an engineering masterpiece and it set new standards in all areas. Whilst automotive styling is somewhat subjective the E-Type is often ranked atop lists of the most beautiful cars and in fact, it has been described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made. Jaguar could build sports cars but they were also very successful at building sports saloons. In 1955 the Jaguar Mk1 was introduced to fill a gap in the model range of a small to medium sized luxury saloon. Initially introduced with a 2.4 litre 6 cylinder engine and later a 3.4 litre 6 cylinder engine this model was very successful with some 38,000 examples sold between 1955 and 1959. In 1959 the Mk2 was introduced and whilst visually similar at first glance the new car had many improvements over its predecessor. In addition to the 2.4 litre and 3.4 litre engines the Mk2 was also offered with a 3.8 litre engine as used in the E-Type. Just over 80,000 Mk2s were built from 1959 to 1967. The Mk2 was to be replaced by the XJ6, however, delays with this car resulted in Jaguar producing another series of the Mk2 which was designated as the 240 and 340 to fall into line with the nomenclature used with other models on offer at the time, specifically the 420. The 240 and 340 were built from 1967 to 1969 andalmost 4,500 and 2,800 respectively of each model were built. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1960 Jaguar Mk2 3.4 Litre Sports Saloon. This car has the desirable manual gearbox with overdrive. We love cars that have a documented and interesting history and this Jaguar Mk2 has an incredible history file and an absolutely fascinating history. The cars first owner was Mr C.S.C. Wickens who was a senior executive with Shell International Petroleum Company Ltd. There is lots of early documentation on file, including the original purchase order from Shell International Petroleum Company Ltd, dated 18th March 1960 which specifies the car as follows: Jaguar MK2, 3.4 litre, 4 door, 6 cylinder, saloon, right-hand drive, sherwood green with tan interior, export model, fitted with manual gearbox with Laycock deNormanville overdrive. Extras: 23 GRB radio to cover medium and short wave band, registration in the name of C.S.C. Wickens, supplying and fitting number plates, handling and delivery via London on the 28th November 1960. The Jaguar Mk2 was heading to Nigeria as the order specified this as the destination for the car. The order was changed at the eleventh hour as Mr Wickens must have received a transfer to a new posting in the Netherlands. The order was changed to a left hand drive car, with a scheduled delivery for the 1st December 1960. The original delivery invoice on file confirms the car was delivered to Shell International Petroleum Company Ltd for Mr C.S.C Wickens, tax free, on the 2nd December 1960. The invoice notes a radio (230RB) was supplied and fitted. On delivery the car was registered in the UK as 7629DU. The first service was carried out by Henlys in London on the 28th February 1961 at 1,473 km. Mr Wickens moved to the Netherlands in 1961 and took the car with him. The car was registered in the Netherlands as GK-09-48. Whilst in the Netherlands the car was regularly serviced by N.V J.W Lagerwu (Jaguar dealer and importer). The last service was carried out on the 9th February 1965 at 23,585 km. In 1965 Mr. Wickens moved to Australia. He returned his beloved Jaguar back to Coventry on the 1st March 1965 to be converted to right hand drive. At the time the car was thoroughly checked over, serviced and the speedo was changed to miles per hour in preparation for shipping in March/April 1965. There is correspondence on file between Jaguar and Mr. Wickens fully documenting this. The car was sent to Melbourne and collected by Brysons and registered in Victoria as JGD 600. The cars first service in Australia was at Brysons on the 20th December 1965 at 3,510 miles. In May 1978 Mr Wickens transferred to Brisbane and the car was registered in Queensland as 308 NFZ. There are three service books with this car. The last entry in the third service book is on the 5th November 1980 at 58,847 miles. In March 1983, at around 80,000 miles, the engine was completely overhauled. The last records of Mr Wickens ownership are a Queensland certificate of registration dated 31st May 1987 and a subsequent service invoice dated October 1987. The car found its way to the Gold Coast and remained with another long term owner until being acquired by the current owner in 2014. By this time the car had been off the road for many years, patiently waiting to be restored. Prior to changing hands the car had been given a bare metal respray, however, its then owners failing health stalled the project. Over a four year period the car was restored. The restoration included a bare metal repaint in old English white, the trim was completely re-upholstered in red leather, new carpets were fitted, a new hood lining was fitted, all the timber was refurbished with Burr Walnut all from the same tree, most of the brightwork was rechromed, insulation/sound deadening material was installed, new tyres were fitted, the brakes were overhauled, power steering was fitted and more. The end result is a beautifully presented Jaguar Mk2 3.4 Litre Sports Saloon that is just a delight to drive. The old English paint work is fresh and vibrant with only a small number of imperfections and blemishes evident. The majority of the chrome work is excellent, though it is obvious that the door handles are original and were not rechromed as part of the restoration. Both right hand side door handles show some light pitting. The glass, rubbers, lenses and wheels are all in very good condition. It should be noted there is a small scratch on the left hand side of the rear screen. Whilst wire wheels look great on a Jaguar Mk2, we really love the traditional look of this car with its original steel wheels and hub caps. Inside, the cabin of this Jaguar Mk2 is just a lovely place to be. Everything smells and feels fresh. And so it should as everything is essentially new. Its hard to fault. Importantly all of the instruments and controls are in working order, including the overdrive which cuts in and out at the flick of the switch. The engine bay and boot present very cleanly, consistent with the overall condition of the car. The owner recently drove the car 300 kms from his home to us in Brisbane and it did not miss a beat. Not surprisingly the car performed exceptionally well on our recent test drive. There is an electric choke installed which is operated by a button under the dash. It is required for a cold start but can be switched off pretty much straight away. It should be noted that car has been fitted with an auxiliary cooling fan operated by a button adjacent to the choke. Out on the open road this car drives really well. The engine has travelled less than 10,000 miles since it was rebuilt and it is still strong. As with all old Jaguars with a Moss gearbox you have to be considered with the gear changes and mindful that there is no synchromesh on first gear. You are back in the saddle pretty quickly and just enjoy the drive. The car steers, handles and stops as one would expect. Accompanying the car is its original book set with three service books, workshop manual, spare parts catalogue, incredible history file through to the mid 1980s, tool kit, jack and a spare wheel. There is also a Shell key ring which we understand dates back to circa 1960, which is a nice touch given this history of the car. Today the odometer reads 89,649 miles. As noted previously, the car had a speedo/odometer change in 1965, so in total the car has travelled a documented 89,649 miles plus 23,585 km. Highlights: - an export market car that was converted by Jaguar in Coventry to right hand drive in 1965. - one of the most desirable specifications for a Jaguar Mk2, having the 3.4 litre engine mated to a manual gearbox with overdrive. - matching numbers chassis and engine. - a fascinating history with an incredible history file through to the mid 1980s. - recently restored and now ready to enjoy. - a great looking car with a real presence on the road. This 1960 Jaguar Mk2 3.4 Litre Sports Saloon with a manual gearbox and overdrive will be a great addition to a Jaguar collection or perhaps a fabulous entry level classic car. Price - $72,500.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1076960
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 3,781

1962 Jaguar Mk2 3.8 Litre Sports Saloon (Manual with O/D)

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1070804
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,568

2001 Nissan Skyline GT-R R34 M-Spec

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1090589
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 1,971

The Bristol Car Company has a rich and fascinating history. Its origins date back to the Bristol Aeroplane Company (formerly The British and Colonial Aeroplane Company) that was founded in February 1910 by Sir George White, chairman of the Bristol Tramways and Carriage Company, along with his son Stanley and his brother Samuel, to commercially exploit the fast-growing aviation sector. The Bristol Aeroplane Company developed into a British industrial powerhouse and they built some of the worlds most technologically advanced aeroplanes. Some of the most well-known and successful aircraft built by Bristol were the Bristol F2 Fighter (used during World War I), the Bristol Bulldog and the Bristol Beaufighter (used during World War II). Following the First World War the British aircraft industry suffered a dramatic downturn and subsequently significant financial challenges. In an endeavour to keep its workforce employed the Bristol Aeroplane Company undertook the manufacture of a light car, the single seat Bristol Monocar which was powered by a motorcycle engine, the construction of car bodies for Armstrong Siddeley and bus bodies for their sister company, Bristol Tramways. The company survived, but times were tough. Aircraft manufacturing ramped up again with the outbreak of the Second World War, however, management had learned that they must plan for the future. It is understood that discussions started as early as 1941 to establish a post war car manufacturing division. Bristol began working with AFN Ltd, makers of Frazer Nash cars and British importer of BMWs before the war, on plans for a joint venture in automotive manufacturing. What ultimately eventuated was that the Bristol Aeroplane Company took over AFN Ltd and established its car manufacturing division, Bristol Cars. A purpose built factory was constructed at Filton Aerodrome, near Bristol. The first Bristol was designated the 400 and not surprisingly given the Frazer Nash and BMW connection it was based on a BMW 326 chassis with BMW 327 styling. The engine, whilst built by Bristol, was also based on a BMW 327. The first prototypes were built in late 1946, however, the car was formally introduced at the 1947 Geneva Motor Show. The car was a great success for Bristol and almost 500 examples were built through until 1950. This included 17 Drophead Coupes with coachwork by Pininfarina. In 1949 Bristol introduced the 401, which was designed and bodied by Touring of Milan in Italy. The new model was aerodynamically sleeker and featured superleggera construction with an aluminium body over a steel frame. As a result the car weighed significantly less and its performance was greatly enhanced. Bristol was gaining a reputation for building technologically advanced motor cars that were luxurious, very reliable and offered genuinely exciting performance on the road. Their cars were not cheap andas a result they remained somewhat exclusive. Buyers of new Bristols back in the day were typically wealthy businessman who wanted a car to stand out in a crowd. They also wanted a car they could drive and enjoy and many Bristols were used for hill climbs and weekend motor racing. Bristol developed the 450 specifically for motor racing and it made its debut at the 1953 Le Mans 24 hour race. Two cars were entered in the race, however, they both retired with engine failures after about 10 hours. Bristol returned to Le Mans in 1954 and entered three cars, with uprated engines and improved aerodynamic bodywork. In contrast with the previous year all three cars finished the race, coming home in first, second and third place in their class and seventh, eighth and ninth overall. Their performance also earned Bristol the team prize. Bristol returned to Le Mans again in 1955 and again performed exceptionally well achieving the same results as in 1954. The race became famous for the wrong reason when a major accident resulted in debris flying into the crowd killing 83 people and injuring many more. Following this race a number of manufacturers, including Bristol, retired from motor racing indefinitely. Subsequent road cars included the 403 (1953-1955, 287 cars built), which was a further development of its predecessors, the 404 (1953-1958, 52 cars built), the 405 (1953-1958, 308 cars built and the 406 (1958-1961, 174 cars built). Bristol Cars was sold after its parent company joined with other British aircraft companies in 1960 to create the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC), which later became part of British Aerospace. In 1953 Bristol introduced the two door 404 and four door 405. For these models Bristol abandoned the BMW style radiator grille for a style that reflected its aviation heritage. A unique design feature of the 404 and 405 is the sizable lockers in the front wings accessed externally by gullwing doors. On a right hand drive car, the locker on the drivers side held the spare wheel and jack, whilst that on the passengers side housed the battery and fuse panel. These cars also had upgraded engine performance, an improved gearbox with a short gear lever and front disc brakes as an option. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1955 Bristol 405 Sports Saloon. The original build sheet on file confirms that this car was ordered on the 01/10/54 by Parrs (Leicestershire) Limited from Abbey Lane in Leicestershire in the UK as a demonstrator. The estimated date of despatch was noted as 18/02/55. The original colour scheme is noted as chinese ivory with black upholstery and gold wheels. The car was originally registered as MJF2. The factory Car Service Record on file notes a disc brake conversion on the 16/10/58 at 15,847 miles. There is also a document on file summarising its history. The cars first owner was Frank Newton Bott from Linwood just outside Glasgow in Scotland. Bott immigrated to Australia in the 1960s, bringing the car with him. He moved to Perth in Western Australia and the car was registered as URN 640. Bott sold the car in September 1968 to Reg Blewett who also lived in Perth. Over the next 35 years, the car changed hands a few times, initially staying in Perth then moving east to Melbourne and later Bendigo. The cars current owner, who is very well known in the Bristol community in Australia, purchased it in 2003 from Colin Kennedy in Bendigo. This Bristol 405 was a little tired when he purchased it and in 2008 he had the body stripped to bare metal and repainted in its current colour scheme of navy blue with a silver roof. There are some photos on file of this work. The body was found to be very good, apart from some corrosion around the front indicators. Some woodwork was replaced around the rear window. This and a few other imperfections were expertly repaired by a gentleman at the Caboolture airport, where he was restoring vintage aeroplanes. The panel gaps are generally very good for a hand built car. The current owner is a driver and not a polisher, so therefore his cars get used! Today this car presents very well, but it is not a show car. The paint is in good condition as is all of the external trim. Unfortunately, someone has reversed into the car and hit it with what looks to be a tow ball. There is a slight dent in the front bumper which has also pushed back and caused minor damage to the body. The damage is not obvious, but it is there. The wheels are in good condition and shod with (older) Falken 175/80R16 tyres all round. The interior was retrimmed back in 2008 and it still presents nicely today. There are no rips or tears to the upholstery and even the carpets are in good condition. The timberwork is also in good condition, but it would benefit from a sand and polish. There looks to have been large speakers previously mounted on the rear parcel shelf which have left some marks. The rear quarter windows are both missing their latches. The engine was rebuilt back in 2008 and the car would have travelled less than 10,000 miles since then. The car runs and drives exceptionally well and anyone in the know appreciates that the engine and gearbox are both a feature on these early Bristols! This car has a wonderful exhaust note and the engine sounds just fabulous. These cars were well ahead of their time and this example proves just that. Its hard to believe that this is a 65 year old car! Whilst the driving position is typically 1950s British, you do feel comfortable behind the wheel. The steering wheel itself is quite large in diameter. It is similar to a period Aston Martin and designed to give the driver the ability to easily manoeuvre the car whilst driving with some gusto! Out on the open road this car performs exceptionally well. Its current owner has driven it to rallies right across the country where it has always performed with aplomb. The car has factory overdrive which makes it a comfortable cruiser at motorway speed. Did we mention the engine and gearbox . . . fantastic! The documentation on file notes that the car has had an engine change very early in its life, possibly before being sold to its first owner. The engine in the car is the correct engine type, with the suffix 100B. Today the odometer reads circa 87,500 miles. Accompanying the car is the original build sheet, some Bristol historical documents & club records of ownership, restoration photos from 2008, a spare wheel/tyre and jack. The following quote from British Autocar magazine (8th October 1954) sums up the Bristol 405 very well . . . . a close examination of both the mechanical components and the bodywork indicates that the manufacturers of this streamlined sports saloon are out to produce a vehicle that is as good as the best. Highlights: - A rare and exclusive 1950s British classic. - 1 of only 308 examples built. - Well presented in a colour scheme that perfectly suits the car. - Mechanically sorted and ready to use. Price $104,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1102098
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2

The Mini was born from the major fuel shortages in the UK due to the Suez Crisis in the mid to late 1950s. Petrol was rationed and as a result the demand for large imported cars slumped. At the same time the demand for small, fuel efficient cars skyrocketed. In 1955 BMC had recruited Alec Issogonis from Alvis. His task was to design a range of technically advanced family cars in the same innovative spirit as the Morris Minor (that he had previously designed). Leonard Lord was the head of the British Motor Company (BMC) and he laid down the basic requirements for his small car. It should have 2 doors, be able to seat 4 people and be contained in a box measuring 10 x 4 x 4 feet (or 3.0 x 1.2 x 1.2 meters). The plan was also to use an existing BMC engine to save on development cost. By July 1957 BMC had built the first prototype that was code named XC9003. Leonard Lord approved the car for production on the 19th July 1957. Prototype XC9003 became project ADO15. ADO15 was to use an existing BMC A series four-cylinder water cooled engine of 948cc capacity. However, contrary to most cars this engine was mounted transversely in the car to create more space for the driver and passengers. Interestingly, testing showed this engine would give the car a top speed of over 90mph which was deemed unnecessary and the engine capacity was reduced to 848cc. The production version was first demonstrated to the press in April 1959 and it was officially announced to the public on 26th August 1959. The Mini as it was now called was marketed using the two main BMC brand names, Austin and Morris. In the UK the Morris version was known as the Morris Mini Minor and the Austin version was known as the Austin Seven, named after the popular Austin from the 1920s and 1930s. In Australia the car was introduced as the Morris 850. It was officially launched in March 1961, though it is understood cars were sold in this country prior to that. Interestingly, the Mini was never officially sold as an Austin in Australia. Initial sales of the Mini were slower than expected, however, by the early 1960s the Mini had found its niche and BMC produced over 200,000 cars in 1962. As they say, the rest is history and the Mini went on to become a motoring icon and when production finally ended in October 2000, around 5.3 million cars were built. It is understood that BMC built c1.2 million MkIs from 1959 to 1967 and c400,000 MkIIs from 1967 to 1969. The Mini was of course reborn under BMWs ownership in 2000. One of Alec Issogonis good friends was John Cooper, the owner and founder of the Cooper Car Company. Cooper immediately saw the potential of the Mini for competition and the Mini Cooper was introduced in September 1961. The standard Minis 848cc engine with 34 bhp was replaced by a 997cc engine developing 55 bhp, and front disc brakes were introduced. In 1963 the Cooper was followed by the even more potent Mini Cooper S with a 1071cc engine and a top speed of close to 100mph. In 1962, Rhodesian John Love became the first non British racing driver to win the British Saloon car Championship in a Mini Cooper. While the standard Mini and the Mini Cooper had already been used in rallying by BMCs competitions department, the Mini Cooper S became an outstanding rally car. The car won races all over the world, including the prestigious Monte Carlo Rally three times for BMC, in 1964, 1965 and 1967. In Australia, production of the Morris Mini started in late 1961 and locally built cars began to differ from their British counterparts as local components were used. The Mini Cooper was launched in October 1962 and the Cooper S in September 1965. In Australia, production of the Mini ceased in 1978. In 1966 a Mini Cooper S driven by Rauno Aaltonen and local hero Bob Holden led a pack of Cooper Ss home to snare the first nine places outright in the Bathurst 500 mile race, a record which still stands today. In 1999 the Mini was voted the second most influential car of the 20th century, behind the Ford Model T, by the Global Automotive Elections Foundation. What a legend! Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a genuine, matching numbers, Australian built 1969 Morris Mini Cooper S. Not much is known about the early days of its life in Australia. It is understood the car was delivered as part of the 02/1969 batch, the second last batch of MK 1s built in Australia. This car retains its original and correct ID tag which confirms that it retains its original matching numbers engine. The ID tag also notes this car was originally painted in the Special Burgundy 1/SPEC.BURG.RED/3. From our research it is understood the car spent most of its life in South Australia. It found its way to Townsville in north Queensland at some stage and it was repainted in c2004. The car was painted British racing green with a white roof and apart from the colour change it was reported to be very original. This Mini Cooper S was then purchased by its next owner, who lived in the ACT, in 2007. During his ownership the car wasnt driven much, but it was serviced on a regular basis by local specialist Melba Motors. Some modifications were made to the car, including fitting a steering column with a column ignition barrel, Minilite wheels and wheel arch flares. Lack of use made its then owner decide to sell the car in 2018. At that time the odometer was reading 63,175 miles. Interesting an advert on file for the car at that time states that it even still had the optional woodgrain dash in the car. The car was then sold into Adelaide and its next owner had the intention to refurbish it and bring it back to original and excellent condition. He sourced new original style steel wheels to replace the Minilite wheels, replaced the brake boosters, had the brake system reconditioned, had the front suspension reconditioned, replaced the rear shock absorbers and did some general tidying up. All in all, he spent over $4,000 on the car. Unfortunately, time got away from him and he never quite got to finish the car. A once in a life time opportunity presented itself for him, to purchase a pre-war Bentley, so that meant the Mini had to go! The owner of the Bentley took the Mini as part payment earlier this year and finished the refurbishment work started by the previous owner. The car was repainted and further tidying up was completed. Today this car presents well. The colour scheme is just perfect for a Mini Cooper S. The fresh paintwork looks good and it carries a high gloss finish. The glass and the external trim, including the lights/lenses, chrome and stainless-steel parts on the car are all in good condition. This car is fitted with the original steel wheels with hub caps, which is the traditional and we think best look for a Cooper S! These are also in good condition. The aftermarket wheel arch flares give the cars an aggressive look, though these could be easily removed by the cars new owner if required. The interior of this car presents in a good condition. The dash on this Cooper S has been upgraded with a classic Rokee style dashboard and as noted previously we understand this has been in the car since new. It presents well. The seats and door cards are in good condition and the upholstery shows some light patina, but there are no rips or tears. The seats provide ample support and offer a great driving position. Thecarpets are also in reasonably good condition. The instruments are clean and in working order. At some stage a second tacho has been installed but the original one is present and working. The engine bay and boot are both clean and well presented. There is spare wheel and jack with the car. John Cooper saw the vision and these cars are all about the drive! The first thing you notice when you get behind the wheel is just how much space there is inside the cabin for what is a small car. Its quite brilliant really! The position of the steering wheel immediately gives you that go-kart feeling. The starting procure requires the choke from cold . . . you pull out the knob and lock it, then turn the key and the engine starts as you catch it with a blip of the throttle. Woah yeah . . . it is immediately obvious that one of the previous owners has made some modifications to the engine. It has an edge and most likely has a fast road camshaft in it. You need to let the engine warm up and once up to operating temperature this Morris Cooper S definitely goes. In fact it goes like the clappers! The engine feels strong and it revs willingly. Bathurst here we come! Well maybe not, but you get the idea. This car is a blast! Whilst it goes well in a straight line it is even more fun going around corners. Its low center of gravity means the car has hardly any body roll. It eats corners for breakfast and that go-kart feeling is back in spades. The booster assisted brakes stop the car quickly when required. We should point out that whilst the car runs and drives well there are a few additional jobs on the to do list that would take the car to the next level again. These are relatively minor and can be discussed with any potential purchaser. This car is now ready for its next owner to use and enjoy. Today the odometer reads 63,241 miles. Highlights: Australian built, factory right hand drive Morris Mini Cooper S. Matching numbers engine, with period correct colour combination. A great driving car with an upgraded (original) engine. Recently repainted. Well presented and a great drivers car. Price $ 49,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1061054
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,926

Apple, Coco-Cola, McDonalds and Nike are brands recognisable the world over. So is Ferrari and interestingly the iconic Italian luxury sports car manufacturer was named The Worlds Strongest Brand in the 2019 Brand Finance Global 500 Report. Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 out of Alfa Romeos race division as Auto Avio Costruzioni the company built its first car in 1940. The Second World War halted Ferraris dream, which was finally realised in 1947, when the first car bearing his name, the Ferrari 125 S, was built. From that day on Ferrari race cars dominated the world over, winning race after race and many world championships in Formula One, sports car racing and endurance racing. Ferrari built exclusive sports cars for the road too, but in the early days, this was primarily to fund his motor racing! The Cavallino Rampate or prancing horse was the symbol chosen by Ferrari and like the golden arches it is recognised by just about every man, woman and child on the planet! The Ferrari road cars from the 1940s and early to mid-1950s were built in very small numbers and it was not until the introduction of the 250 series cars that production numbers increased. Almost 1,000 Ferrari 250 GTEs were built from 1959 1963. The 250 series also produced some of the most special Ferraris ever built, including the Ferrari 250 LM, 250 SWB, 250 California Spider and of course the 250 GTO. The 250 series cars were superseded by the 275 series cars, the 330 series cars and later the 365 series cars. The nomenclature designated the cubic capacity of each cylinder. So a Ferrari 330 was powered by a 12 cylinder engine of 3967cc capacity. Ferraris iconic Dino was first shown to the world as a prototype at the 1965 Paris Motor Show. The car morphed into the 206 GT of which only 150 cars were built from 1967 to 1969. In 1969 the 246 GT was released, which whilst a similar looking car in many ways was actually quite different. The car sat 3 taller than its predecessor and the body was nowbuilt from steel. Mechanically the new car was powered by a 2418cc V6 engine. Enzo was keen to tackle Porsche head on and to do this he needed to increase production. The Dino was a hit and circa 4,000 of these cars (both the 246 GT and 246 GTS) were built from 1969 to 1974. At the 1975 Paris Motor Show, Ferrari introduced its new model, the Pininfarina designed 308 GTB. The 308 GTB was introduced as a supplement to the Bertone shaped 308 GT4 2+2 and a direct replacement for the Dino 246 GT. The 308 GTB received rave reviews from the motoring press and it was an instant success. The Dino 246 GT fans were pleased to see some of the design elements from the Dino carried across, such as the scalloped air intakes on the side panels, the twin tail lights and the recessed curved window glass. At the same time, it was definitely a modern design. Carrozzeria Scaglietti was responsible for the bodywork, however there was a slight difference compared to previous models. The 308 GTB was the first production Ferrari to be produced with a fibreglass body (or glass-reinforced plastic, GRP), except for the front bonnet, which was made out of aluminium. There are various arguments as to why Ferrari chose fibreglass for its new model but the general consensus is Ferrari was disappointed with the sales results of the Dino 308 GT4 and wanted to speed up the production of the new car to offset lost sales to competitors such as Porsche, Maserati, Lamborghini and Lotus. It was also quicker and easier to make moulds for fibreglass construction than dies for metal pressings. Using fibreglass also helped to keep the weight down. In fact, the 308 GTB only weighs 1,050kg. Its debatable exactly how many fibreglass Ferrari 308 GTBs were built. The most often stated numbers are 712 and 808, of which perhaps 150 were right hand drive. It is understood thatFerrari switched to steel bodies (in June 1977) for commercial reasons. The Italian translation of fibreglass is vetroresina, which is the nomenclature often used for these cars. The first 308 GTBs were powered by a three litre V8 engine with a dry sump. Countries that had more stringent emission control standards at the time, such as the USA and Australia, received wet sump cars only. Later on, all 308 GTBs had wet sump engines. In 1977 Ferrari introduced the 308 GTS, which was essentially the same car with a targa roof. The car was made famous through its appearance in the TV show Magnum PI. The model evolved into the 308 GTBi / 308 GTSi in 1980 when Bosch K-Jetronic mechanical fuel injection replaced the traditional Weber carburettors. Two years later the four valves per cylinder Quattrovalvole or QV was introduced. The 308 was an incredible success and circa 12,000 cars were built from 1975 to 1985 before the 328 was introduced. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a very special Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina. This particular car is confirmed as the very first UK delivered, factory right hand drive 308 GTB ever built. Documentation on file from the Maranello Concessionaires Archives confirms that this car was ordered on the 19th September 1975 and specified as rosso chiaro (20-R-190) with a beige leather interior (VM3234) and beige carpets. The car was ordered with electric windows, tinted glass, a heated rear window, leather trim and air conditioning. The car was delivered on EE plates ex Maranello and we assume driven back to the UK. The documentation on file notes this car as a Maranello Concessionaires Demo or Press car and it was first registered in the UK as MPH70P. The original service book states a delivery date of the 27th May 1976. The cars first service is dated 1st June 1976 at 959 miles and that mileage would be the road trip from Maranello in Italy to Maranello Concessionaires in the UK. This very car was featured in a number of motoring publications including Autocar (issue 23rd October 1976) and Motor (issue 11th September 1976). It was also featured on the cover of a 1980 Eurovox car calendar. Unfortunately, little is known of the cars subsequent early history until it found its way to Australia, most likely in the early 1980s. The car was owned for many years by journalist Bruce Webster who predominantly used the car for track days and tarmac rallies. Unfortunately in Websters ownership the car suffered a catastrophic engine failure at a race meet in the 1980s. The original dry sump engine was replaced by a wet sump engine. The car changed hands in 2000 and its new owners took a still relatively standard 308 GTB and modified it further to improve its performance. The car competed in the Australian Tarmac Championship and rallies such as Targa Tasmania (13 times), Targa Wrest Point (6 times), Targa High Country Mt Buller (3 times), Alpine Classic and others. In 2011 the car finished a very credible 19th outright and 1st in class at Targa Tasmania, taking care of the early Porsche 911s and BDA Escorts! In 2014 the car suffered an off at Targa Tasmania resulting in some front end panel damage. That turned out to be the end of a very successful tarmac rally career for this 308 GTB and the car was subsequently sold. Given the soaring values of all classic Ferraris and the significance of this car, its new owner decided to restore it back to road going guise and to how it was delivered to Maranello Concessionaires back on the 27th May 1976. The only exception was that he chose to restore the car with a deep front spoiler, which was an option back in the day. The original front spoiler will accompany the car. His most important task was to source a correct dry sump engine for the car which he was able to do. Today this Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina presents and drives exceptionally well. The body was completely stripped and professionally restored. There was no choice but to finish the car in its original and classical colour of rosso chiaro! Even though the car was painted some years ago it has not been used since it was restored and as a result the paint work remains fresh and vibrant with a strong depth of colour. All of the exterior trim, badges, bumpers, lenses and the glass are in excellent condition. Importantly the car sits on original 14 wheels with correct Michelin XWX tyres, which give the car a perfect stance. You open the door to reveal an interior that presents beautifully. The seats and door cards have been re-upholstered and the work was done to a very high standard. The car has new carpets throughout, including the boot. The original steering wheel, all of the instruments and controls are in good condition and everything looks to be in working order. After getting comfortable behind the wheel, its time to bring that V8 engine to life. Turn the ignition on and let the fuel pump do its work, then turn the key and with a short blip of the accelerator pedal the V8 bursts to life. The car starts easily and quickly settles into a smooth idle. We love the exhaust note of a 308 GTB . . . it is loud but in a refined way! After waiting (impatiently!) for a few minutes for the car to warm up, its time to take it out on the road. This 308 GTB does not disappoint. In fact, it is absolutely fabulous to drive! The engine feels strong and it revs freely throughout the rev range. The gated shifter is a feature on these 308s and it lets you move the gear lever through the gears with great precision. The gearbox is smooth and shifting up and down is easy. Out on the open road this 308 is a real pleasure to drive. Its handling is exactly what you expect from a Ferrari 308 GTB. It is nimble and precise. It simply goes where you want it to go and it stops when you want it to stop. You get used to this car very quickly. It is very easy to drive, and that exhaust note . . . theres no need for a radio in this 308! It just begs to be driven. The air conditioning system has been disconnected. There is a compressor complete with brackets and a new condenser (which is almost impossible to find) that will accompany the car. As mentioned previously, this car has not been used since it was restored. It certainly needs to be driven and on every outing weve had with the car it gets better and better the more you drive it. The car will require a final tune which will be done prior to delivery to its new owner. The car does not have a thick history file, but importantly it does have its book set, including its original warranty card, in the Ferrari leather wallet. There is also a correct, complete tool kit, jack kit, space saver spare wheel, safety triangle and accessory light. Highlights: - Confirmed as the very first UK delivered, factory right hand drive Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina built. - The Maranello Concessionaires Demo or Press car. - Featured in period car magazines. - Finished in its original colour scheme of rosso chiaro with a beige interior. - The car has recently been restored and it presents and drives fabulously. - Accompanied by books, including the original warranty card, tools and a jack kit. - The car is ready to be enjoyed by its next owner. These fibreglass bodied Ferrari 308 GTBs were built in relatively small numbers and they are now highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts the world over. The odometer reads 10,151 miles. Price: AUD $289,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1100256
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,164

The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 aluminium bodied cars by hand in their small factory at Gmünd before relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany. The rest they say is history as the 356 evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built. A hard act to follow indeed . . . but its replacement, the Porsche 911 went on to become a legend! The evolution of the Porsche 911 is probably the greatest sports car story of all time. First introduced in 1963 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, and then designated as a 901, the successor to the 356 took the world by storm. To avoid conflict with Peugeot, who claimed exclusive rights to car names with three digits having a zero in the middle, the car was renamed as 911. The first production 911 was built in 1964 and it was powered by an air cooled 1991cc 6-cylinder engine. The car evolved with increases in engine capacity to 2.2 litres, 2.4 litres, 2.7 litres, 3.0 litres and 3.3 litres. There were styling changes also, but one always recognised the car as a 911. Today the first series of 911s is recognised as the cars built from 1963 to 1989 and include the very popular Porsche 911 and 930 Turbo models. Of these the small bumper or pre impact bumper cars built up to 1973 are today regarded as the real classic 911, however, that comes at a price. In the last few years astute collectors and enthusiastshave seen great value in 1970s and 1980s model 911s. The Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 was introduced in 1983 as a successor to the 911SC. Interestingly, it was the first time the Carrera name had been used since 1977. Visually the new car was similar to its successor, both internally and externally. The major change to the new car was its engine. Whilst based on the SCs 3.0 litre power plant, Porsche claimed the 911 Carrera engine was 80 per cent new. The capacity was increased to 3164cc and a revised piston design increased the compression ratio to 10.3:1 on all but North American cars. But the Carreras main innovation was its Bosch Motronic 2 engine management system. This was the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control the ignition and fuel systems. In addition, the fuel injection was updated to Bosch LE-Jetronic and the induction and exhaust systems were revised. The upshot of these improvements was that power rose to 231 bhp at 5900 rpm, with torque hitting 284 Nm at 4800rpm. Porsche claimed fuel consumption to be 10 percent better than that of the SC, because of the greater efficiency of the electronically controlled engine. The last of the 911 Carrera 3.2s was built in 1989 and the model was most popular with circa 76,000 cars built during six years of production. The approximate breakdown of models was c35,500 coupes, c20,000 cabriolets and c18,500 Targas. Porsche also offered the 911 Carrera 3.2 with the option of the Turbo body (option code M491), which is most often referred to as the wide body or in some markets Supersport. Today the Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 is recognised as an 80s icon and these cars are now becoming highly sought after. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a stunning 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe. Being a late model Carrera 3.2 this car has the desirable G50 gearbox. This UK delivered, factory right hand drive particular example was sold new to Janet McWhire from Comber, Northern Ireland on the 1st August 1988. The car was sold though Isaac Angew (Mallusk) Ltd in Newtonabbey. This car was delivered new in Silver (paint code 980 S7) with a Marine Blue interior (interior trim code SW, carpet colour code 4KV). The car was delivered new with the following options: recoil bumpers, heated driver and passenger seats, Blaupunkt Toronto radio cassette, high fidelity package, amplifier system, rear seat belts, forged alloy wheels anti-theft device, rear wiper, electronic front left and right seats, spoilers, sport shock absorbers, sun roof and luggage compartment trimmed in black velour carpet. The car remained in Ireland for the next 4 years, during which time it changed hands twice. In 1992 the car found its way to England where it was registered as HDZ 3033. The car remained in the UK from 1992 through until 2011, passing through a number of careful owners. The service book and history file confirm that this car has been impeccably maintained by Porsche / Porsche specialists since new. The car then found its way to Australia. There is an Import Approval on file dated 20th of January 2011. The car remained with its new owner in Sydney for the next 9 years, however, it was sparingly used travelling a meagre 400 miles in this time. The current owner of this Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe acquired the car in April 2020 and went on a journey to make, what was a very good car, a great car. Over the past year or so he has spent in excess of $50,000 to bring the car to its current level. It started with a major service by well respected Brisbane based Porsche specialist DHM Motorsport. All fluids were changed, the valve clearances were checked and adjusted where necessary, the brake callipers were overhauled, new brake pads & wear sensors were installed and the reverse light switch was replaced. The owner then decided to make some cosmetic improvements to the car. It was solid underneath but it had surface rust on suspension components and generally throughout the underside of the car. The plan was a quick tidy up of the more significant issues, however, this was a case of when youve started where do you stop! One thing led to the next before he knew it he was doing a complete underbody restoration. The entire suspension was removed from the car and worn parts were replaced with new genuine Porsche parts, all acquired through Porsche Brisbane. New shock absorbers front & rear, control arms, front & rear disc rotors, ball joints, rear spring plates & bearing covers, using new bolts/fasteners, were fitted. At the same time a host of parts were vapour blasted and powder coated, including the front struts, trailing arms, front hubs and subframe, oil cooler guard, front tow hook & under tray and the disc brake backing plates. The original 16-inch Fuchs wheels have been completely refurbished by Depulu Wheels in Ashmore on the Gold Coast and present like new. To complete the look new centre caps and new Pirelli P Zero tyres have been fitted. The original exhaust has been replaced with a new TT stainless steel system, including extractors. It sounds great and gives the car a really aggressive exhaust note, without being overly loud. Importantly, the original exhaust (which is in good condition) comes with the car. The end result is one absolutely fabulous Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Coupe. Today this car presents essentially like new. It is difficult to fault and would not be out of place sitting alongside the new cars at The Porsche Centre Brisbanes Newstead show room. The paint work on the car is exceptional and it is a struggle to find any paint defects. We found two very small marks on the car, one on the roof and the other one is behind the door handle on the drivers side. All of the external trim is in excellent condition, complimenting the paintwork perfectly. The glass is original and in excellent condition all round. There are no chips or marks on the windscreen. The interior is a real time capsule. The dark blue leather is a perfect colour contrast with the silver exterior and it is in excellent condition. There is the slightest amount of patina, but its condition and presentation belies that this is a 30+ year old car. The instruments, controls, steering wheel, dash, head lining and even the carpets are in similar condition. As noted previously, this is a well optioned car that is fitted with a factory electric sunroof, electric windows and electric operated & heated seats. All operate perfectly. The only upgrade is the radio. A new Blaupunkt Bremen radio has been installed which looks almost identical the factory original, however, it has the added benefit of modern technology and has blue tooth. The presentation of this car is impeccable but will it be as good to drive? After driving the car for less than 5 minutes that question is answered . . .YES, the car drives every bit as good as it looks! Not surprisingly, given all of the work done to the car, it is incredibly tight and firm on the road. The steering is direct and the G50 gearbox in this car is smooth and easy to operate, something you notice immediately as soon as you select first gear. The engine in this car is strong it revs freely through the rev range. After 20 minutes out on the road we can confirm that this car lives up to its reputation in every way. These late model Carrera 3.2s are fantastic cars to drive and this example is one of the very best. COVID restrictions ignored, we would have no hesitation to drive this car to Melbourne tomorrow! Today the odometer reads 101,077 miles. Video inspections are welcome. Highlights: - magnificently presented late model 911 Carrera 3.2 with the desirable G50 gearbox - highly optioned car with factory sunroof. - finished in a stunning colour combination. - low mileage, with only 101,077 miles on the odometer. - known history from new - books (including a fully stamped service book), tools and jack - just a magnificent motor car Price: $194,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
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