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  • RefCode: TA1208565
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,965

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this striking Australian delivered, factory right hand drive Maserati Merak. The documentation on file from Maserati Classiche confirms that this car was completed on the 11th June 1974 and sold to Auto Italia in Melbourne. Its production date makes this quite an early car. The car was originally delivered in orancio (orange) with a dark grey velvet (velour) interior. Apart from being sold new into Adelaide, the early history of this car is not known. The earliest documentation on file is a South Australian registration certificate dated 30th October 1987 and a transfer of ownership to a Mr H Clisby dated 1st May 1988. At that time the car was registered as UMZ 377. There is a detailed write up on file from a previous owner, a Mr Don Venn from Adelaide, in which he mentions he purchased the Merak in 1990. In his ownership the car was stripped back to bare metal including the engine frame and the engine bay. All corrosion was cut out and replaced with new metal. There are photos on file documenting the work done. The car was then painted using Dulux acrylic lacquer in Ferrari Fly Yellow. Mechanically, the car also underwent a full refurbishment. Everything was assessed and what needed to be replaced was replaced. In 1994 the car was sold to its next owner, Mr Tony Chapman from Sydney, NSW. At that time the car had 74,000 miles on the odometer. Chapman used and enjoyed his Merak through his 22 years of ownership clocking up some 24,000 miles. Chapman sold the car through Shannons 2016 Sydney Spring auction. Its new owner was a classic car enthusiast in Perth. Whilst he loved his new yellow Merak he thought it would look even better finished in its original colour of orange! He engaged the services of Italian car specialists, Auto Delta, in Perth Western Australia to generally freshen up the car and have it repainted. One thing led to another and the car essentially underwent a second restoration. In addition to a repaint, the interior was retrimmed and a significant amount of mechanical work was also undertaken. The mechanical work included overhauling the hydraulic system, cooling system, brakes, steering and fitting a new clutch. The engine was rebuilt, which included refurbishing the cylinder heads and replacing the block which was in poor condition. At that time the odometer read 98,437 miles. After the restoration was complete the car was shown at Perths premier classic car event, the Celebration of the Motorcar in November 2020 where it won the Classic Sports Car class. The cars owner then moved to Brisbane and decided to move in a different direction with his collection. This fabulous Maserati Merak was sold through Oldtimer Australia to its current owner in February 2022, at which time the odometer read 98,537 miles. After the current owner acquired the car he ironed out a few post restoration bugs and had the paint work ceramic coated. He has subsequently regularly used and enjoyed the car. It has been taken to various classic car events in and around south east Queensland, where it has been a regular trophy winner. It won the Peoples Choice award at the Lakeside Euro Day in May 2022 and European Sports category at the Noosa Beach Classic Car Show in July 2022 and again in September 2023. The car was also taken to Auto Italia in Canberra in March 2023 where it was awarded the Chief Judges Choice award. Today the odometer reads 01,912 miles, so in two years of ownership the car has travelled almost 3,400 miles or 5,600 km. It is great to see that the car has been driven, but we should point out it presents even better than when we sold it back in 2022! The Maserati Merak is one of Giorgetto Giugiaros finest pieces of work. The trademark flying buttress softens the look of the car and as a result it carries colour exceptionally well. The first thing youll notice when you walk up to this car is the colour. It is ORANGE, very ORANGE, however, it is just so seventies and it really suits the car. It shows off the lines perfectly and contrasts well with the painted Campagnolo wheels. Overall, the first impressions of the car are really good. It presents exceptionally well and the paint has retained a deep gloss and a mirror like smooth finish. Walking around the car we struggled to find any imperfections. There is a small mark in the swage line of the passengers door and a small bubble in the bottom front of the passengers door. You have to kneel down and look closely to see both. The external trim is minimalistic, however, it is all in very good condition. This includes the bright work, lights/lenses and the glass. The car sits on its original and unique Campagnolo wheels. The wheels are in very good condition with no kerb rash. They are shod with period correct Michelin XWX tyres, size 205/70/15 which are still in excellent condition. They are date stamped 3815 (week 38, 2015). Open the door and you are welcomed by a very good looking interior. These early Meraks had the same dashboard as its big bother, the Maserati Bora. The upholstery is relatively fresh and the seats are in very good condition with no sign of any cracks or tears in the leather. They are comfortable and provide plenty of support. The Merak is a token 2+2 and the two rear seats appear to have never been used, other perhaps for an overnight bag. The centre console, door cards and dashboard all presents equally well. The carpets remain plush and are clean. All the instruments are clear and appear to be in good working order. Under the front bonnet youll find a small boot which is clean and the carpet is in good condition. The engine bay also presents very well. Everything looks clean, neat and tidy. The space saver spare wheel, running a Pirelli tyre that appears to have never been used, sits in the rear of the engine compartment. It is quite an incredible design that the engine sits so far forward in this 2+2 mid engine sports car! On closer inspection everything in the engine bay looks to be essentially correct. Our memory from early 2022 was that this car drove really well. After being fettled, then used and enjoyed we were keen to take the car out for a current test drive. The starting procedure is typically Italian car of that era. Turn the ignition on, allow the fuel pump a little bit of time to fill the Weber carburettors, then give the accelerator pedal a few pumps and turn the key to start the car. It fires up easily, even from cold and the fairly quickly settles into a smooth idle. Out on the road this Maserati Merak is fun to drive. By modern standards it is not fast, but it feels light and nimble on the road. The engine responds quickly to the slightest touch of the accelerator pedal and you often feel like you are travelling faster than you actually are. The Citroen controls are quirky, but once you get used to driving the car it is very rewarding. The gearbox, which should be used to maximise the power band from engine feels precise and direct. The gear changes are smooth both up and down the box. The steering is direct and precise, which coupled with the superb handling ensure that the car feels glued to the road at all times. The brakes are very direct and pull the car up easily and in a straight line. All too soon our test drive comes to an end and we return the car to our showroom. Unfortunately, there are quite a few tired Maserati Meraks out there, which can bring no end of problems. Good cars that are sorted, ready to use and enjoy are few and far between. This car is a very well sorted example of an iconic 70s Italian junior super car which is ready for its next owner to use and enjoy. Accompanying the car is a very good history file, various trophies, a car cover, a copy of a parts manual, a copy of a workshop manual and a copy of an owners manual. Highlights: - Australian delivered, factory RHD early Merak. - Beautifully presented example of this iconic Maserati - Recently restored in its original colour - Good history file - Ready to be used and enjoyed. Price $139,950. Background: The Maserati story is a fascinating one. It is the story of a family with daring, courageous and forward-thinking ideas. The story starts with Rodolfo Maserati, a railway engineer who was employed by the Italian monarchy and the father of seven sons who all had a passion for engine design and racing cars. The Maserati brothers all became involved in the automotive industry in some way or another, however, it was on the 1st of December 1914 that Alfieri, Ettore and Ernesto Maserati officially opened Alfieri Maserati Workshop in Bologna, Italy. Maserati chose the trident logo to adorn its cars. Its design was based on the Fountain of Neptune in Bolognas Piazza Maggiore. The colours chosen for the logo were also the colours of Bologna, red and blue. The business was focused on repairing, servicing and preparing cars, however, the World War cut business short and it wasnt until 1926 that Maserati built its first car, the Tipo 26. It was all about motorsport back then and in 1937 the Orsi family acquired ownership of Maserati which was in desperate need of financial backing to be able to survive. During the Orsi years Maserati grew from a boutique but very successful race car builder to one of the worlds leading manufacturers of hand-built sports and GT cars. Maserati built its first road car in 1946 even though times were tough in post War northern Italy. The car was the Maserati A6 where A was for Alfieri and 6 for the number of cylinders. The initial reception of the car was positive and a production Maserati A6/1500 was then shown at the 1947 Geneva Motor Show. This was a significant milestone in the Maserati legend and subsequent models included the A6G/2000, 3500 series cars, 5000GT, Mistral. Quattroporte, Mexico, Sebring and Ghibli. Maserati also continued to build very successful race cars that dominated tracks around the world including the 250F, 300S, 150S, 450S and the Birdcage. Orsi sold to Citroen in 1968. Soon after, the idea of a two seat mid-engined super car was conceived. It was then in the summer of 1969 the first prototype of Maseratis new car was built. This car was known as Tipo 117 and was ultimately named Bora after a wind from the Northern Adriatic Sea. The car became a reality in relatively short time and it was officially launched at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1971. Like the Ghibli before it Maseratis new flagship was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, this time for Ital Design. In many ways the Bora was a unique design and its trademark was that its roof and A pillar were finished in brushed stainless steel in contrast the rest of the painted body. The early seventies were tough time for supercar manufacturers as the oil crisis hit hard, effecting the sales of cars with large displacement engines. Maseratis answer was the V6 engined Merak. The Maserati Merak (Tipo 122) was introduced at the 1972 Paris Motor Show and it followed in the footsteps of its big brother the Bora. The models name, chosen by Maseratis commercial director Dominique Drieux, was not a name of a wind and is not to be confused with the Eponymous Indonesian city in Java. It receives its name after a star in the Ursa Major constellation. Like the Bora, the Maserati Merak was designed by Ital Designs Giorgetto Giugiaro and its ancestry is obvious though there are many subtle but significant differences in the cars design. The Merak is one of Giugiaros finest pieces of work. Whilst based on its big brother the Bora, the Merak doesnt have a full glass fastback, but rather a cabin ending abruptly with a vertical rear window and a flat, horizontal engine cover pierced by four series of ventilation slats. Giugiaro completed the vehicles silhouette by adding open flying buttresses, visually extending the roofline to the tail. The Merak is a 2+2 though its rear seats are best described as occasional or for an overnight bag or golf clubs only! Its Italian competitors all ran V8 engines, however, Maserati opted to use a longitudinally mounted 2,965cc V6 engine that had its roots in the Citroen SM. Given the company was owned by Citroen at the time it is not surprising that a number of Citroen components were used, including the engine as well as Citroens hydraulic systems and much of the interior. Maserati built some fabulous cars during Citroens ownership (including the Indy, Bora, Merak and Khamsin), however, times were tough and the company struggled financially. Citroen placed Maserati into liquidation in May 1975 and it was ultimately saved by the Italian government and Alejandro de Tomaso took control shortly thereafter. Interestingly when Alejandro de Tomaso acquired Maserati the Merak underwent a make over of its interior which was well received at the time. In addition to the standard Merak, Maserati brought out the Merak SS in 1976 which was lighter and had a more powerful engine and also the Merak 2000 in 1977 specifically for the Italian market which imposed a heavy tax on cars with engines greater than 2,000cc capacity. The Merak was one of the seventies junior supercars, much like Lamborghinis Urraco and Ferraris 308 GT/4, that was going to tackle Porsche head one and be sold in significant quantities to underpin the cash flow of the company during the oil crisis. The formula made good sense and Maserati enjoyed much success with its Merak and 1,820 examples were built in a twelve year period from 1972 to 1983.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1220511
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,463

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this 1974 Lamborghini Uracco P250. According to the Lamborghini factory records, this car was completed on the 2nd May 1974. This factory right hand drive example was fitted with factory air conditioning and delivered new to the UK. The car was originally giallo (yellow paint code 2469019) with a nero (black) interior. The early history of this car is not known, though it is understood to have come to Australia early in its life. A long term Sydney owner, who originally found the car advertised in Unique Cars magazine, commissioned Lamborghini specialist Henry Nehrybecki to give the car a more aggressive look, similar to a Lamborghini Silhouette. The template for the wheel arches was taken from a Lamborghini Silhouette and made from sheet metal. This work was completed by Graham Watson from Ralt Australia. Nehrybecki fabricated the front spoiler, custom alloy grill, front and rear bumpers, the three piece wheels and modified the front suspension. The car was painted by Con Papoulis from Hi Tech Paintshop. A that time the colour was changed to dark metallic blue. It is understood that this work was completed in c1997. The project took approximately 9 months from start to finish. The car was featured in Issue 17, the April June 1998 Lamborghini Club of Australia magazine The Bulls Roar. The car changed hands and remained with its then owner from Glenmore Park in Sydney, NSW through until November 2008. At that time the car was registered with the personalised plates CRETE1. The cars new owner was from Hornsby in Sydney, NSW and at the time he acquired the car the odometer read 75,703 miles. It was then registered in NSW as AW99RR. In his ownership the car was serviced and maintained by Eagle and Raymond Automotive in Asquith, NSW. There are several invoices on file documenting the service history of the car. The car then found its way to the Gosford Classic Car Museum where it was displayed before being acquired by the current owner in July 2017. At that time the odometer read 81,982 miles. Since then it has had a mechanical refresh which included a new clutch, suspension rebuild, gearbox rebuild, replacing the head gasket and other miscellaneous works by classic Lamborghini specialist Sports and Classic Car Services in Braeside, Victoria. The car has only travelled c2,000 miles since the majority of that work was completed. The most recent annual service was executed on 1st July 2022 and at that time the odometer read 83,833 and in April 2024 the carburettors were cleaned and rebuild by Classic Fix in Brisbane. Today the odometer reads 83,987 miles. This Lamborghini Urraco certainly has a presence about it. The flared wheel arches, front spoiler and aftermarket wheels give the car a very aggressive stance. The dark metallic blue colour really suits the car. Overall, the paint is still in a good condition having retained a strong depth of colour and a high gloss finish. Up close you will see a few imperfections, consistent with an older repaint and with a car that has been used occasionally. The most noticeable defects are a chip on the B pillar on the drivers side about half way up and a few scratches on the front of the car, most likely caused by the bonnet stand. There is also some gravel rash evident on the front of the rear flared wheel arches and some small stone chips on the front spoiler. The louvered engine cover and the louvers on the side of the car have been finished in black and are in good condition. Besides the window frames and badges there really isnt much bright work on a Lamborghini Urraco. The frames and badges, along with the lights, lenses and the glass are well presented and in good condition. The Silhouette style wheels are in very good condition with no evidence of any curb rash. The centre caps are faded and replacing these would lift the presentation of the car. The wheels are shod with Toyo Proxes T1R tyres, 205/45 ZR16 at the front and 245/45 ZR16 at the rear. The front tyres are date stamped 0910 (week 9, 2010) and the rear tyres are date stamped 3718 (week 37, 2018). The front tyres, whilst they still appear to be in good condition, should be replaced based on age. Open the door and you are welcomed by a sharp looking interior. First impressions are good. The grey upholstery provides a perfect colour contrast with the blue exterior. The seats are in a good condition and provide ample support. The centre section of the front and rear seats have been upholstered with a velour style fabric. On the front seats the fabric has started to slightly stretch, though there are no rips or tears. The rear seats have probably never been used since the car was retrimmed. The car is fitted with an aftermarket steering wheel in a matching colour. All the instruments present well. They are clear and appear to be in good working order. The dashboard itself also presents well with no marks or discoloration evident. We did notice that the headlining has a few marks and could use a little bit of attention. One of the previous owners must have been short as the front seats have been raised to provide a more comfortable driving position (for a smaller person). To suit a driver of average size or above, both seats would need to be lowered. These baby bulls are underrated and great fun to drive. It was a wet week in Brisbane and when we finally got a break in the weather, it was with great anticipation that we got to take this Urraco out for our test drive and photo shoot. The Weber carburettors on these early Lamborghinis are thirsty and require plenty of fuel to start the car. The correct starting procedure is to turn the ignition on, let the fuel pump do its work for at least twenty seconds, then give the accelerator pedal a few pumps, then turn the key further to start the car. If you follow these steps the engine will burst to life with relative ease. The sound is fantastic and these little V8s make a growl like no other! These cars always feel a little stiff to start. But as everything warms up properly the car becomes better and easier to drive. This is most noticeable with the gear changes which become an absolute delight once the gearbox is warm. The engine revs freely through the rev range and the car has plenty of power on tap. The car handles well and feels incredibly stable on the road. There is an occasional knock from the front suspension which we are currently investigating. The brakes work well and they pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. This Lamborghini Urraco P250 is a delightful junior super car. It is a real joy to drive and we think a great alternative to the more ubiquitous Ferrari 308 GT/4, Maserati Merak or Porsche 911. You wont win the concours with this car and it may not appeal to the purist, but we think it is rather cool. It will most certainly turn heads and make an impression wherever it goes. Accompanying the car is a good history file with a copy of an owners manual, the original and often missing Lamborghini libretto di assistenza e garanzia (service and warranty booklet) and some historical documentation and service records. The spare wheel is missing. Highlights: - Factory RHD example. - Good history file with original service book. - Not your average Urraco P250! - Recent mechanical work. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $129,950. Background: The Lamborghini story is fascinating in itself, but for the company to have survived all these years and indeed celebrate its 50th Anniversary in 2013 is quite amazing. Ferruccio Lamborghini was an entrepreneur, a very successful businessman and a lover of the finer things in life, including sports cars. He was fortunate enough to own some wonderful cars including Ferraris however, he found fault with them all. According to the legend following a meeting with Enzo Ferrari to discuss some of the short comings of his cars Enzo dismissed Ferruccio and he subsequently decided that he could build a better car. Not long after, in May 1963, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SPA was established and the small town of SantAgata Bolognese, located between Modena and Bologna, was chosen as the location to build the factory. Born under the Zodiac sign Taurus Lamborghini chose the raging bull as the emblem for his sports cars. Lamborghini knew what he wanted and he put together a highly skilled team. His first car the 350 GTV was shown at the Turin Motor Show in October 1963. This car received mixed reviews; however, Lamborghini was not deterred and made a number of improvements and design changes to the original concept. The first Lamborghini production car the 350 GT left the factory in mid-1964. The 350 GT evolved into the 400 GT 2+2 and later the Islero. In parallel to building these classic front engine V12 GT cars Lamborghini wanted to build a super car, enter the Miura first shown as a rolling chassis in 1965, and also a GT car that could comfortably seat four people, enter the Espada in 1968. The mid to late sixties were good times for Lamborghini and his cars were revered the world over. In 1970 the Islero was replaced by the Jarama. Lamborghini also wanted to enter the junior supercar market and introduced the Urraco or little bull, named for the fighting bull which killed the toreador Manoleten, at the 1970 Turin Motor Show. The Urraco attracted huge interest from the motoring world and Bertones classic wedge shape received critical acclaim at the time. It wasnt until some two years later, in 1972, that the first production cars rolled off the Sant Agata production line. Lamborghini hoped to build the Urraco in big numbers, however, this never eventuated and only 520 of the P250s were built up until 1975 when the P300 was released. The world economy changed quickly and the early 1970s were a tough time for Lamborghini. Additionally, the Urraco had some teething problems early on and the car unfortunately developed a reputation as unreliable. This was perhaps unfair as once Lamborghini ironed out the bugs the car was in fact a little gem and properly sorted was a genuine threat to Ferraris 308, Maseratis Merak and the Porsche 911 of the day. The Urraco P300 was indeed a fabulous little car and in Sports Car World magazine July September 1976 Mel Nichols wrote: . . . I was not hard pressed to conclude that the Urraco 3-litre is the most enjoyable car I have ever driven. In the October 1978 issue of Car Magazine Nichols pits the Lamborghini Urracoagainst a Ferrari 308 GTB and a Maserati Merak SS. The article is compelling reading and Nichols picks the Urraco as his favourite. Only 205 Urraco P300s were built. Lamborghini also built 66 Urraco P200s (with a 2 litre V8 engine) specifically for the Italian market.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1219143
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,343

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a very early factory right hand drive Jaguar E-Type Series 3 V12 2+2 with the desirable manual gearbox. The Heritage Certificate on file confirms this particular example was delivered to its first owner through Henlys in London, UK. The car was manufactured on 9th September 1970 and dispatched on 24th March 1971. The car was delivered in warwick grey with a red interior. It was first registered in the UK with the registration JGP 2K. The Heritage Certificate also confirms this car was built with a manual gearbox and that it still retains its original matching numbers V12 engine. The early history of this car is not known, though it is understood to have come to Australia very early in its life. We pick up the ownership trail in the early 1980s at which time it was owned by Mr JD Staines from Chermside in Queensland. At that time the car was registered as 800 NMZ. He sold the car in March 1984 to Mr Ronald Hughes from Ballina in NSW. In Hughes ownership the car was registered in NSW as RH 4696. When Hughes purchased the car, he was under the impression it was in fair condition. Sometimes, things are not always as they seem and that was certainly the case here. What started out as a plan to generally improve the car, turned into a cosmetic restoration! The body was stripped to bare metal and repainted. The car was repainted in regency red (maroon), which at that time was understood to be its original colour. We now know this is not the case, suggesting that the car had a colour change very early in its life prior to Hughes ownership. The interior was also retrimmed at that time. Hughes enjoyed the car for a few years before selling to its next owner, who was then based in Valla on the mid north coast of NSW on the 1st March 1988. This E-Type has been retained in the same family ever since, during which time it has clearly been loved and cherished. There are numerous receipts on file showing all the work that was done to the car over the last 35 years. It has been religiously maintained and whenever something needed to be done, it was done. The car now resides in Brisbane and in more recent times it has been maintained by classis Jaguar specialists Classic & Prestige. To make it more usable in the hot Queensland climate air conditioning was installed in 2020 and the side and rear windows have been tinted. Today the car presents beautifully. Walking around it, first impressions are very positive. The colour combination is just perfect and really suits the car. The regency red paintwork has withstood the test of time very well and it retains a nice gloss finish and a strong depth of colour. This car has been used and enjoyed, so yes there are a few very small imperfections here and there but you have to look closely to identify them. Generally, the bright work on the car is in very good condition, though there are some very small scratches on the bumpers, but again you have to look closely. The lights and lenses are all in good condition. The same can be said for all the glass. This car retains its steel wheels with the chrome Jaguar hub caps running Bridgestone Conselfa 205/70R16 tyres all around. These should be replaced based on age. Open the door and you are welcomed by a very good looking interior. The biscuit upholstery provides a perfect colour contract with the regency red paintwork, giving the car a very sophisticated look. The seats are very comfortable and all in very good condition with no rips or tears evident. The rear seats appear to have hardly been used over the years. The door cards and the carpets are also in good condition. All the instruments present well. They are clear and in good working order. The aftermarket air conditioning system has been discretely installed and it works well. As with all Jaguars from this period you need to use the choke when starting the car from cold. The big V12 then starts easily and it quickly settles into a smooth idle. After a short time you can slowly back the choke off and use the throttle to warm the engine. These Series 3 E-Types are very comfortable, but with the 4 speed manual gearbox they are also great fun to drive. They are completely different to the 6 cylinder early E-Types. When introduced, the Series 3 cars were targeted at the lucrative American market. They are slightly bigger, a lot more comfortable and they also feel much more like a GT car than a sports car. But, make no mistake, when pushed they go pretty hard! Given how particular the current owner is about this car it is not surprising that it is an absolute delight to drive. The 5,343cc 12 cylinder engine has loads of power on tap and the gear changes are smooth and easy both up and down the box. Once warmed up, the engine purrs. This car handles well and it is equally at home on a windy mountain road as it is cruising the motorway. The brakes on the car work well and pull the car up quickly and in a straight line when needed. Accompanying the car is an extensive history file dating back to 1984, an operating, maintenance and service handbook, a book titled E-Type an End of an Era, some period magazines, a spare wheel, jack and toolkit. There is also a car cover and some miscellaneous spare parts. We are genuinely excited to be able to offer this fabulous car for sale. It wont win the concours, but as a car you can use and enjoy it would be hard to find better! It would make a very good impression at any classic Jaguar event or Cars and Coffee. Highlights: - Factory RHD example, with matching numbers - Desirable 4-speed manual gearbox. - Beautifully presented car that is just a delight to drive. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $134,950 Background: The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful, though their cars had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. The SS100 built between 1936 and 1941 is today regarded as one of the great pre-war sports cars, however, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The XK120 morphed into the XK140 and ultimately the XK150 and in total, just over 30,000 cars were built over 15 years of production. In 1961, at the Geneva Motor Show, Jaguar introduced the E-Type, which like the XK120 all those years ago, took the motoring world by storm. The body styling was simply gorgeous and technologically the E-Type was an engineering masterpiece and it set new standards in all areas. Whilst automotive styling is somewhat subjective, the E-Type is often ranked atop lists of the most beautiful cars and in fact it has been described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made. And its not just about the looks as the E-Type is often at the top of other lists such as the best sports car ever built or the most significant cars. It is truly a motoring icon. As a testament to the success of the E-Type, production evolved through three series from 1961 until 1974 during which time circa 70,000 cars were built.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1218916
  • Body Type: Targa
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,485

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this Australian delivered, factory right hand drive 1986 Lamborghini Jalpa. According to the Lamborghini Registry this car was completed on the 24th November 1986 for Australian importer A.A. de Fina. The car was originally rosso (red paint code 215157) with a panna (cream) interior, which is how the car is presented today. The Australian compliance plate is dated 1/87. The early history of this car is not definitively known, however, it is understood to have come from long term Sydney ownership. The car was then sold to another Sydney owner in circa 2005 before being sold by Oldtimer Australia to the Gosford Car Museum in July 2015. At that time the odometer read 45,005 km. The current owner acquired the car from the Gosford Car Museum in early 2018. At that time the car presented well cosmetically, but it was a little tired. In July 2018 Melbourne based classic Lamborghini specialist, Sports and Classic Car Services completed a major mechanical refresh of the car. They rebuilt the engine, which included reconditioning the cylinder heads and engine ancillaries, rebuilt the gearbox, installed new rear shock absorbers, replaced the brake hoses and installed new rear wheel bearings. At the same time a new Quicksilver exhaust system was installed. In total, $43,000 was spent on the car to bring it up to its current condition. At that time the odometer read 45,054 km. In May 2020 Sports and Classic Car Services performed an annual service and safety check and at that time the odometer read 45,819 km. The next service was performed in June 2022 and at that time the odometer read 47,242 km. The current owner has used the car sporadically in the last eighteen months and today the odometer reads 47,630km. First impressions of this car are good, really good! Overall, it presents well. It is understood the car was repainted back in 2005 shortly after it changed hands. The rosso paint has retained a high gloss and a strong dept of colour. However, if you look closely you will notice some small paint imperfections. The most noticeable one is on the edge of the B pillar on the drivers side and there are some small paint bubbles on the rear bumper. The Lamborghini badge on the front is showing its age and is the first thing we would replace! The Lamborghini and Jalpa badges on the rear of the car are in good condition. All the glass presents well with no cracks or delamination evident. The targa top is in very good condition. The original and quite unique Route Oz wheels present well. There is some very minor curb rash visible, but nothing too noticeable. The front wheels are shod with Pirelli Cinturato P7 tyres, size 205/55 R16. These are date stamped 5117 (week 51, 2017). The rear wheels are shod with Hankook Ventus RS4 tyres, size 225/50 R16. These are date stamped 1221 (week 12, 2021). Both the front and rear tyres are still in good condition. Open the door and you are welcomed by a sharp and very good looking interior. The interior was refreshed less than twelve months ago and as a result the seats present well and are in very good condition with no rips, tears or cracks evident. They are surprisingly comfortable and provide ample support. The matching door cards are also in very good condition. The seats and door cards are both trimmed with red piping, which is so eighties and as the car was finished new. The matching carpets are also in very good condition with no excessive wear evident. The dash presents well and the top has not been affected by the harsh Australian sun. There are no cracks evident nor is there any discoloration. Overall the instruments and controls present well and appear to be in good working order. A known problem with Italian cars from this period is that the needles on the speedo and the tacho have a tendency to warp. Both instruments on this car are slightly warped, but both are working and look to read correctly. The metal gear shifter gate is showing its age and is something we would have cleaned up and polished. The Nardi steering wheel is most likely original and generally in good condition, though there are a few cracks appearing in the leather. A good leather doctor would attend to this easily. Under the front bonnet everything is very original. Unfortunately, the space saver spare wheel is missing. The engine bay presents well and behind it, underneath the rear spoiler, youll find the boot, which whilst relatively small is bigger than it looks! There is plenty of room for a few overnight bags. The boot retains its original carpet and is in quite good condition. Shortly after the car arrived at our showroom, we found a break in the inclement Brisbane weather and were able to get it out for a quick test drive and photo shoot. The car starts easily, even from cold. The Quicksilver exhaust system has a fabulous note to it without being too noisy. Out on the road the car drives easily and the more you drive it the more you like it! The engine has loads of power and the gear changes are smooth, both up and down the box. The steering feels precise and is not too heavy. We did notice the AC was not working and upon further investigation we discovered that the hoses have been disconnected and the compressor is missing. Whilst the car runs and drives well, it would benefit from a tune and it probably needs to used and enjoyed more regularly. In 2019 Motortrend wrote an interesting article about the Jalpa called Driving the Lamborghini Jalpa: A Classic Supercar Worth Remembering. In the article the Jalpa is described as . . . an intriguing car with a beguiling personality far different from the bigger, better-known Lamborghinis. In the article automotive historian Massimo Delbo describes the Jalpa as . . . simply and enigmatically: If you know, you know. Unfortunately, the Jalpa was introduced at the wrong time, America was pulling out of a recession and people favoured its bigger brother the Countach or even Ferraris entry level car, the 328. As far as the nouveau riche were concerned, there was only one Lamborghini worth considering. Motortrend questions this; Was their belief correct? The Jalpa is arguably the better sports car, a ballerina compared to the brutish Countach. The author, after his test drive, states: Given the choice between a Countach and a Jalpa a guy can dream, right? I know which I would pick. A week ago, my answerwould have been different, but now I know and hopefully you do, too. With only 410 examples ever made and approximately 35 in right hand drive, the Jalpa is indeed a very rare car. Here is a unique opportunity to own an Australian delivered, factory right hand drive example and become part of the small group of people who can experience first hand how good and how much fun this junior super car is to own and drive. This car wont win a concours, but it is a really nice example that presents and drives well. It can be used as is or easily taken to the next level should one desire to do so. What a fabulous alternative to a Ferrari 308 / 328! Highlights: - Rare Australian delivered, factory right hand drive example. - Major mechanical work, including engine rebuild, in July 2018. - Quicksilver exhaust system fitted. - Recent interior refresh. - Join an exclusive club. Price $189,950. Background: The Lamborghini story is fascinating in itself, but for the company to have survived all these years and indeed celebrate its 50th Anniversary in 2013 is quite amazing. Ferruccio Lamborghini was an entrepreneur, a very successful businessman and a lover of the finer things in life, including sports cars. He was fortunate enough to own some wonderful cars including Ferraris however, he found fault with them all. According to the legend following a meeting with Enzo Ferrari to discuss some of the short comings of his cars Enzo dismissed Ferruccio and he subsequently decided that he could build a better car. Not long after, in May 1963, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SPA was established and the small town of SantAgata Bolognese, located between Modena and Bologna, was chosen as the location to build the factory. Born under the Zodiac sign Taurus Lamborghini chose the raging bull as the emblem for his sports cars. Lamborghini knew what he wanted and he put together a highly skilled team. His first car the 350 GTV was shown at the Turin Motor Show in October 1963. This car received mixed reviews; however, Lamborghini was not deterred and made a number of improvements and design changes to the original concept. The first Lamborghini production car the 350 GT left the factory in mid-1964. The 350 GT evolved into the 400 GT 2+2 and later the Islero. In parallel to building these classic front engine V12 GT cars Lamborghini wanted to build a super car, enter the Miura first shown as a rolling chassis in 1965, and also a GT car that could comfortably seat four people, enter the Espada in 1968. The mid to late sixties were good times for Lamborghini and his cars were revered the world over. In 1970 the Islero was replaced by the Jarama. Lamborghini also wanted to enter the junior supercar market and introduced the Urraco or little bull, named for the fighting bull which killed the toreador Manoleten, at the 1970 Turin Motor Show. The Urraco attracted huge interest from the motoring world and Bertones classic wedge shape received critical acclaim at the time. It wasnt until some two years later, in 1972, that the first production cars rolled off the Sant Agata production line. Lamborghini hoped to build the Urraco in big numbers, however, this never eventuated and only 520 of the P250s were built up until 1975 when the P300 was released. The world economy changed quickly and the early 1970s were a tough time for Lamborghini. Additionally, the Urraco had some teething problems early on and the car unfortunately developed a reputation as unreliable. This was perhaps unfair as once Lamborghini ironed out the bugs the car was in fact a little gem and properly sorted was a genuine threat to Ferraris 308, Maseratis Merak and the Porsche 911 of the day. The Urraco P300 was indeed a fabulous little car and in Sports Car World magazine July September 1976 Mel Nichols wrote: . . . I was not hard pressed to conclude that the Urraco 3-litre is the most enjoyable car I have ever driven. In the October 1978 issue of Car Magazine Nichols pits the Lamborghini Urracoagainst a Ferrari 308 GTB and a Maserati Merak SS. The article is compelling reading and Nichols picks the Urraco as his favourite. Only 205 Urraco P300s were built. Lamborghini also built 66 Urraco P200s (with a 2 litre V8 engine) specifically for the Italian market. The Lamborghini Silhouette was a further development of the Urraco and it was first shown at the 1976 Geneva Motor Show. The Silhouette was a genuine 2 seater and the 2+2 seating of the Urraco was removed to allow space behind the seats to store the targa top. The Silhouette is one of the rarest Lamborghinis with only 54 cars built, of which only ten were factory right hand drive. Lamborghinis last iteration of their V8 engined junior supercar was the Jalpa (pronounced YAWL-pa), named after another breed of fighting bull. The Jalpa was introduced at the 1981 Geneva show and 410 examples were built spanning seven years from 1982 through to 1988. Of these it is understood that only 35 left the factory as right hand drive and perhaps there are 10 in Australia.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1172958
  • Body Type: Targa
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,162

1985 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Targa

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1208384
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,341

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this fantastic 1983 Aston Martin V8 Oscar India. The Heritage certificate on file confirms this car was built on the 7th September 1983 and it left the factory on 11th October 1983. The car was originally delivered in storm red (paint code 9017) with a fawn pipe burgundy interior (trim code VM.3234/DV6171), a colour scheme the car still carries today. The car retains its original matching numbers engine. The Heritage Certificate also states this car was delivered with Weber carburettors, Avon tyres, beige with burgundy edged carpet, beige leather headliner and a miles per hour speedometer. This car is a highly desirable later model Oscar India with the V580 Series engine and BBS wheels. It also has the blanked out radiator grill that was standard on the Aston Martin V8 Vantage. Like the majority of the Aston Martin V8s built, this car is equipped with a Chrysler Torqueflite three speed automatic transmission. The documentation on file confirms that this Aston Martin was delivered through Victor Wilson Limited in Edinburgh, Scotland to its first owner, Mr M Carney from Glasgow, Scotland. It was first registered as MAT 78. Around 1989 the car was sold to Mr M Blackall, an Englishman temporary living and working in Belgium as the Area Director of Operations for a major hotel group. At that time the car was registered as A946FSF. The car spent the next two years in Belgium before the owner moved back to the UK and took the car with him. In 1993 he upgraded to an Aston Martin V8 Volante and this car was sold to Mr M Walker from Edinburgh in June 1994. In September 1996 the car was advertised for sale by the Murray Motor Company in Edinburgh and sold to Mr R Forrester from Cairneyhill, a small village just north of Edinburgh. In 2000 the Murray Motor Company advertised the car for sale again and subsequently sold it to Mr Keenan from Apperley, Gloucestershire, UK. The car was registered with the registration A4 SFK. These UK plates are still fitted on the car. The current owner, who has an extensive and eclectic collection of cars, acquired this Aston Martin in the UK in mid 2006 and subsequently imported it into Australia. There is an Import Approval on file dated 31st July 2006. Shortly after arriving into Australia the car was repainted in its original colour of storm red. The car has not been driven any distance since arriving in Australia and it has been in static storage for some fifteen years. It was last started about five years ago and today the engine turns over easily. Today the odometer reads 69,688 miles, which based on the information on file, is genuine. Even though the car carries what is now considered an older repaint, the paint still presents very well. As a result of the car not being driven since it was repainted, the paint has never been exposed to the harsh Australian sun. It retains a deep gloss and a strong depth of colour. There are only two small defects in the paint. There are two very small chips on the boot lid and there is also a small scrape on the edge of the drivers door. Subsequent to our photo shoot, these defects have been touched up using original touch up paint supplied with the car. All the glass, which looks to be original, and external trim is in very good condition. The same can be said for the bumpers and the other bright work on the car. It is all in very good to excellent condition. The BBS wheels, which are a real feature on these later Aston Martin V8s present like new with no curb rash. They are shod with Avon Turbosteel 70 tyres, size 235/70/15. The thread on the tyres still present like new, however they are date stamped 4400 (week 44, 2000), and should really be replaced on age. Open the door and you feel like you are stepping back in time. The interior has been beautifully preserved and is in beautiful condition. It is also very English! The fawn leather seats are in excellent condition with no cracks or tears in the leather. They are comfortable and still provide plenty of support. The rear seats appear to have hardly been used. All the carpets are in excellent condition. The dashboard presents like new. The timber veneer inserts are in excellent condition as is all the leather. Even the top of the dash is still in excellent condition. The instruments are all clean and present well. There is a row of push switches on the centre console and you often see these with faded text. Not in this car. The text is as clear as it was on the day the car left the factory. In the boot everything is clean and tidy and there is an original spare wheel present. Open the bonnet and you are presented with a magnificent looking V8 engine. It is hard to miss the Aston Martin Lagonda text on the valve covers and of course there is the plate with the name of the person who assembled the engine. The engine in this car was built by Fred Walters. All very Aston Martin! Everything presents as one would expect. The engine is bay is neat, clean and tidy. The underside of this car presents well. There is light surface corrosion on some of the components, however, this is not a typical English car underneath. The overall presentation is consistent with a 41 year old car that has been well cared for. As mentioned earlier in our write up, this car has not been driven since it arrived in Australia all those years ago. Before the car can be driven it will require recommissioning. Accompanying this car is a comprehensive history file dating back to new, which includes the original service book. This car has an incredible presence and it presents fabulously in the striking colour of storm red. We envisage the recommissioning to be relatively straight forward and have no doubt this car will drive every bit as good as it looks! A unique opportunity. Highlights: - Rare and desirable example of one the iconic Aston Martin V8 series. - Beautifully presented example of a quintessential British GT. - Fabulous original colour scheme. - Known history from new. Price $289,950 Background: Aston Martin has produced bespoke sports cars for over 100 years. The company began in 1913, when founders Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford realised their desire to build distinctive, high quality sports cars that were both exhilarating to drive and a beauty to behold. Martin regularly competed in hill climb races at Aston Clinton, and a simple combination of the name of the event and the driver gave birth to one of the most famous automotive marques. Source: www.astonmartin.com. Whilst Aston Martin produced some wonderful cars in their early years business, was always a struggle and the company was severely disrupted during both World War I and II. The company went bankrupt on more than one occasion and has endured many different owners throughout its history. David Brown acquired Aston Martin in February 1947 and the first car produced during his ownership was the Aston Martin 2 Litre Sports, later known as the DB1, which was built in extremely limited numbers from 1948 to 1950. This was succeeded by the Aston Martin DB2 in 1950, which featured a new double overhead cam straight six engine of 2.6 litre (2580 cc) capacity, and was a car that really put post war Aston Martin on the map. The David Brown era was arguably Aston Martins finest with the company winning LeMans in 1959 and the sixties producing the legendary DB4, DB5 and DB6 models. The first of the Newport Pagnell designed cars, the DBS, was introduced in 1967. The DBS was initially powered by Aston Martins tried and true 6 cylinder engine as the companys new V8 engine was not ready. From September 1967 through until May 1972 Aston Martin produced 829 DBS chassis. One of these was used in a crash test and 26 of these were later fitted with a V8 engine which leaves a total of 802 six cylinder Aston Martin DBS. Of these 802 cars, 621 were right hand drive and 181 left hand drive. The DBS was available with a five speed ZF manual gearbox or an automatic gearbox or. Interestingly, 317 of the right hand drive cars were fitted with the five speed manual gearbox. It is understood that Aston Martin only built circa 70 right hand drive examples equipped with the Vantage engine. In September 1969 the DBS was superseded by the DBS V8, powered by the all new 5.3 litre V8 engine which was finally ready for production. The DBS V8 remained in production through until April 1972 and circa 400 cars were built. It was then renamed and became the Aston Martin V8, which became a great success for the marque. The Aston Martin V8 was produced for 17 years, with production finally coming to an end in 1989. Just over 2,000 cars were built, plus the Volantes and Vantages. In October 1978 Aston Martin introduced the Aston Martin V8 Series 4, otherwise known as the Oscar India (Oscar India = October Introduction, from the phonetic alphabet). The car now sporting burr walnut trim, a blanked off bonnet scoop and a revised boot lid and rear wings to create a sculpted spoiler was visually very similar to the Vantage. The car remained in production through until 1985 and only 352 examples were produced.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1223929
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 7,206

1973 Jensen SP

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1219898
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,893

Details: Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1928 Auburn 8-115 Boat Tail Speedster. The early history of this car is not known; however, it is understood to have been in Australia for a very long time. The car offered for sale was the dream of late Auburn enthusiast Neil Burns. Burns had always wanted to own an Auburn Boat Tail Speedster. In the early 2000s he acquired a mostly complete Auburn 8-115. He subsequently located a factory built Auburn Boat Tail Speedster in Western Australia from which he could copy the body. Measurements were taken, drawings were made and Burns started to build the car of his dreams. It is understood the original body has been preserved from the scuttle forward. By 2010 all major mechanical components had been reconditioned, including the engine, the gearbox, the carburettor and the radiator. All trim, lights and brackets had been rechromed, all the dash instruments had been fitted and a hood assembly had been manufactured. Unfortunately, Burns never got to see the finished product. He passed away in May 2010 and the car was sold from his estate to Ian Waller from Gordon, Victoria. Waller completed the restoration and the car was subsequently displayed at Motorclassica in Melbourne in 2019. In February 2022 the car was displayed at the Torquay Rotary Motor Show where it won the pre 1959 class and was also the outright Best of Show winner. During its restoration, the car was given a few sympathetic upgrades to make it a more reliable and usable classic. According to the documentation on file, the original Warner gearbox which has known reliability issues, has been replaced. The gearbox fitted to the car is a period correct three speed plus reverse crash box, though it is not branded and its make and model is unknown. A Mitchell overdrive has been installed, which gives the car more cruising flexibility. The electrics have all been upgraded to 12 volt, a modern fuel pump has been installed and an alternator has been discreetly installed underneath the car. The current owner acquired this fabulous Auburn 8-115 Boat Tail Speedster in 2022 and he has spent a considerable amount of time and money fettling the car. He has thoroughly enjoyed his brief love affair, however, due to a change in direction he has decided it is time for a new custodian to take ownership of this amazing car. This car looks STUNNING in the photographs, however, in the flesh it has an even more incredible presence. Make no mistake, this is a big car. The sleek art deco styling is a work of art and the more you look at this car the more details you will you notice. The massive bonnet and flowing guards meet at the trademark Auburn grill mounted with the most elegant hood ornament. The most unique feature of the Auburn Speedster is the relatively small vee shaped rakish front windscreen which evokes a sense of speed but at the same time emphasises the size of the car even more. The boat tail rear end just finishes the car off in terms of the uniqueness of its design. The colour combination of black over maroon is just perfect for the car and all the bright work just sparkles. The paint is in very good condition with a strong depth of colour and a high gloss finish. We struggled to find any obvious imperfections. We did find a very small blemish on the lower edge of the right rear guard. You cannot miss the bright work on this car. The massive and very imposing grill, the almost oversize Monogram headlights, the smaller driving lights, the spotlight as well as the wiper motor covers and the mirrors are all beautifully chromed and present in very good to excellent condition. The only exception we noticed is the small mirror mounted on the back of the spotlight that is showing some light wear. Interestingly, rotating this mirror operates the on and off switch for the light for the light. The painted wire wheels are in very good condition with no evidence of any curb rash. They are currently shod with Excelsior Stahl Sport radial tyres, size 5.50R18 which are date stamped 0917 (week 9, 2017). The tyres are still in excellent condition. There is a small door on either side of the boat tail section of the body which provide access to the storage compartment. This is where the soft top is kept and there is also adequate room for some overnight bags. Open the door and you are welcomed by a very simplistic, yet quite elegant interior. The bench seat is in excellent condition with no rips or tears in the leather. It is comfortable and provides ample support. You can also tilt the seat forward to access the storage compartment. The dashboard contains a very simple instrument cluster, that is both functional and in keeping with the style of the car. You literally climb up and into this car. The driving position is relatively comfortable and once settled behind the wheel it is time to hit the road! The starting procedure is as simple as turning on the ignition and waiting a few seconds for the fuel pump to do its work. Then turn the key further and the big V8 bursts to life at pretty much first crank. The engine sounds just fabulous and it very quickly settles into a smooth idle. First impressions are good, in fact, they are really good! After selecting first gear and getting acclimatised to the relatively long travel of the clutch you are soon moving. On our first test drive, instinct says to dab the brake pedal to get a feel for the stopping power of this car. Surprisingly, the brakes are pretty good for a car of this vintage. On pulling out of our showroom and into traffic one cant help but notice that the turning circle isnt the best weve come across. The steering is also quite heavy, but once you are moving it becomes a lot easier. The three speed gearbox is easy to use despite not having synchros. The gear leaver travel is direct which makes the gear changes relatively easy. So many prewar cars have the show, but lack the go . . . but not this car! The engine in an Auburn 8-115 is quoted as producing 115 hp and not surprising this car pulls strongly through the rev range. It accelerates surprisingly quickly and easily keeps up with modern traffic. The brakes are also adequate and they pull the car up in a straight line when needed. The car feels solid on the road and is a real pleasure to drive. Accompanying the car is a soft top, tonneau cover, parts manuals, an instruction manual, some historical documentation and various parts including a spare, correct carburettor. Highlights: - Unique and iconic car from the golden age of American motoring. - The pinnacle of art deco design for an American car. - Fitted with some modern upgrades to make it a more usable classic. - Beautifully restored. - Ready to use and enjoy. Price $209,950. Background: In 1874 Charles Eckhart founded the Eckhart Carriage Company in Auburn, Indiana, USA. When his sons Frank and Morris joined the business they started experimenting making automobiles. In 1903 the two brothers established the Auburn Automobile Company (AAC). That year, at the Chicago Automobile Show, they launched their first car, a chain-drive, single-cylinder, 6hp two seater, with two speed planetary transmission. In 1905 they launched two-cylinder version. By 1909 they had outgrown their dads workshop and they moved to a larger premises in Auburn, Indiana. In 1911 they produced their first four cylinder, 25hp model. A year later they produced a six cylinder car powered by a Rutenberger engine. The car was quite advanced for its day having electric headlights and tail lights. Unfortunately, World War I put a hold to the business and material shortages forced the factory to close. In 1919 the brothers sold the business to a group of investors from Chicago headed by Ralph Austin Bard. The new owners managed to revive the business but were not able to make it profitable. In 1924 they approached Errett Lobban Cord, who at that time was a very successful automobile salesman, with an offer to run the company for them. Cord countered with a leveraged buyout proposal that was accepted. Cord managed to sell off all the old stock quickly and then focused on what would become the glory days for Auburn. 1925 was like a new beginning for Auburn. The new cars introduced that year expressed distinct styling. The new 8 cylinder engines provided both the prestige and performance Cord had desired ever since he became involved in Auburn. In 1927 Auburn even made a name for itself in stock car racing by winning at Salem, finishing third at Pikes Peak and they managed to exceed 108 mph at Daytona Beach. In 1928 the first of the now famous Auburn boat tailed speedsters was introduced, styled by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky. The car was powered by a straight 8, 4.8 litre, Lycoming engine which produced an impressive 115hp. The speedster was a fast car, especially in its day which is supported by the fact that Auburns test driver Wade Morton set a AAA stock car record on the sands at Daytona Beach, Florida on the 20th February 1928 driving a stock bodied 1928 Auburn 115 Speedster at 104.347 miles per hour. All was good for Auburn and despite the looming recession they managed to sell 22,000 cars in 1929. Somehow Auburn attracted sufficient buyers during the Depression years to keep afloat and its 1930s designs were magnificent. Designers, including Alan Leamy and Gordon Beuhrig styled Auburns, Cords and Duesenbergs of that period. 1930 saw only a slight dip in sales and in 1931 sales increased again. In fact, 1931 was the greatest sales year in the history of the company. They managed to sell 33,000 cars and made a profit of $4.1 million. Unfortunately, sales dropped significantly in 1932 and by 1933 Auburn realised they had to make some drastic changes to survive. In 1934 the company made a huge investment in a new car and whilst sales did increase after that, it was not enough to make the company profitable again. In 1937 Auburn declared bankruptcy.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1205011
  • Body Type: Targa
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,995

1978 Lamborghini Silhouette

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1193462
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 4,235

1967 Jaguar E-Type Series 1 2+2

CALL 07 3171 1953
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