1968 VW Buggy: Our shed

By: Cristian Brunelli, Photography by: Cristian Brunelli

Presented by

Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy

A starter issue means decision time for Brunelli: rebuild the 1300, or drop a 2.0-litre in? You can guess the conclusion...

1968 VW Buggy: Our shed
Our shed: 1968 VW Buggy

 

1968 VW Buggy

SUPER BUG

So the Country Buggy was finally home and running fine until the new starter motor, put in by my local auto electrician, stripped the flywheel. Turns out the starter was not suited to a vintage VW; something to do with the pitch, apparently…

Pretty soon I was back on the phone to Morley’s Volksy-obsessed mate, Bondini. You have to drop the engine out to replace the flywheel, he told me. Apparently it’s only four bolts and it’s out. Being that the 1300cc engine was already super tired (it felt like 25hp) I decided to drop a fresh motor in. I was thinking of a 1600 but Bondini talked me into a 2.0-litre with twin Webers. If it wasn’t already scary to drive (and it was) it bloody well would be now!

While the buggy was away getting powered up I got the front seats remade by Bus n Bug in Highett. Going off an original Country Buggy seat they made me a set of replicas that looked spot on, so much better than the ratty old Beetle seats that were in there when I bought it.

Back to the ‘big-block’. I finally got the call that the engine was in and I could take her home. Bondini did a great job; along with the new motor he handcrafted a beautiful stainless steel exhaust system that pokes out in the original position right above the bumper.

After running the new motor in I finally got to sample the power (around 90bhp) but it’s the torque that really makes the car fun to drive now. Wheelspin in a car with no roof, no doors and lap belts is very frightening but really addictive.

 

 


Sign up to our free weekly newsletter for more unique car reviews and features plus see the latest unique and classic cars for sale.

Subscribe to Unique Cars magazine
- Print edition
- Digital edition