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New & Used Cars For Sale in northgate

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  • RefCode: TA1108764
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: Single-Seater

Bruce Leslie McLaren was born on the 30th August 1937 in Auckland, New Zealand. He was born with motor racing in his veins. From the young age of 14 he was racing cars and achieved great success at an early age. McLaren's talent was noted by none other than Jack Brabham, who was racing for Cooper back in the late 1950's. McLaren got a seat driving a Cooper T43 at the 1958 New Zealand Grand Prix where he performed exceptionally well before being forced to retire after completing 71 laps of the 75 lap race. He was selected as 'Driver to Europe' by NZIGP Association and headed to England in March 1958 to drive for John Cooper. Success came quickly for Bruce McLaren and he won the 1959 United States Grand Prix at age 22 years 104 days, becoming the youngest ever GP winner at that time. He then went on to win the first race of the 1960 Formula One season, the Argentine Grand Prix and he would finish runner up in the championship that year to Brabham. Whilst still racing for Cooper, he set up Bruce McLaren Motor Racing Ltd in 1963. McLaren left Cooper at the end of 1965 and announced his own Formula One racing team, with co-driver and fellow Kiwi Chris Amon. It was a tough few years as McLaren found its feet, however, the hard work eventually paid off and Bruce McLaren took his fourth career win, claiming victory in the 1968 Belgian Grand Prix at Spa in his McLaren-Ford. This was the team's first Grand Prix win. Another Kiwi, Denny Hulme, joined McLaren for the 1968 season and won twice in the McLaren-Ford that year with McLaren finishing second in the constructor's championship behind Lotus-Ford. In 1966 McLaren and co-driver Chris Amon won the controversial Le Mans 24 Hours in a Ford GT40. Bruce McLaren was a great driver, however, he was probably an even better constructor. McLaren loved the evolving and very popular Can-Am Series and achieved great success winning five consecutive championships from 1967 to 1971. McLaren himself won the championship in 1967 and 1969 with team mate Denny Hulme winning in 1968 and 1970. American, Peter Revson completed the quintuple winning the championship in 1971. Sadly, Bruce McLaren died on the 2nd June 1970 while testing a Can-Am car at Goodwood. Teddy Meyer took control of McLaren and the legacy lived on with McLaren becoming an even more dominant force in motor racing. McLaren decided to abandon Can-Am at the end of 1972 and focus solely on Formula One. When the original Can-Am series ceased at the end of 1974, McLaren was by far the most successful constructor, with an incredible 43 race wins. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1971 McLaren M8E Can-Am race car. In 1968 Bruce McLaren and his team developed the McLaren M8A for that years Can-Am season. It was an evolution of the M6A (which had won the championship in 1967) and had an all-aluminium 7 litre Chevrolet big block V8 engine. The engines were built by Gary Knutson and developed around 620hp. For the 1969 season the M8B was developed, it had a slightly upgraded engine which now developed 630 hp.. A partnership was created between Bruce McLaren Racing and the Racing Division of Trojan Limited to build the M8C, which was a customer version of the M8A,. Going forward Trojan would build all customer cars and Bruce McLaren Racing would build the works cars. The 1970 season saw the introduction of the M8D. The engine was enlarged to 6.7 litres and now produced 670 hp. For the 1971 season McLaren introduced another customer car, the M8E. It was based on the M8B and again built exclusively by Trojan Limited. The final works car was the M8F which was also introduced in 1971. It now had an 8 litre engine which produced 740 hp. The final customer car was the M8FP which was based on the M8F. Total Mclaren M8 production comprised of 2x M8As and 1x spare tub, 2x M8Bs and 1x spare tub, 10x M8Cs, 4x M8Ds, 11x M8Es (plus 2x unnumbered tubs) and 2x M8Fs. The McLaren M8E offered for sale is chassis number M8E-80-04. The car was purchased by Roy Woods of Roy Woods Racing Inc (US) to complete in the 1971 Can-Am season. The car was entered as part of the ARA American Racing Associates team bearing number 29. They missed out on the first two races but by round 3 at the Road Atlanta circuit, the car was ready to compete with Vic Elford the driver. Unfortunately, problems with the oil pressure and the clutch resulted in a DNF. Round 4 at Watkins Glen gave the team a far better result, the car qualified 16th and finished 8th. Round 5 at the Mid-Ohio circuit resulted in another DNF, however, this time it wasnt a problem with the car. Exhaustion forced Elford to retire the car. Round 6 at the Road of America circuit saw the car qualify in 5th place and finish the race in 3rd position. During the next round at Donnybrook Vic Elford almost repeated the result from the previous round. This time he qualified 6th and finished 4th. For reasons unknown, the car didnt participate in round 8. Round 9 took place at the famous Laguna Seca circuit. Unfortunately, disaster struck in the preceding practice on Thursday. Elford crashed the car, cannoning backwards at over 100mph into a bridge abutment. Fortunately, Elford suffered only minor injuries, but the tub was destroyed and unrepairable. Elford was given an M8D for the race. Roy Woods Racing ordered a new M8E tub and managed to get the car ready for the next round. At round 10 at the Riverside circuit Elford retained the M8D, so Sam Posey drove the M8E, qualifying 7th and finishing 4th. At the end of the season the car was sold to William Bill Cuddy. Cuddy entered the car into three rounds of the 1972 Can-Am season. Alan Johnson raced the car in round 4 at the Mid-Ohio circuit and Bill Cuddy raced the car in round 8 at Laguna Seca and in round 9 at Riverside. In 1973 Cuddy entered the car for only one race, being round 7 at Laguna Seca. After the 1973 season he sold the car to Dick Workman. Over the next few years, the car changed hands a few times. Workman sold it to Lynn Sinclair, who sold it to Merle Brennan who purchased the car for parts for his M8F, but soon discovered the parts were not interchangeable. He sold the car back to Workman minus the front and rear suspension. Dick Workman returned the car to race ready and competed in the 1977 Can-Am series. The car was entered as an M8L, the L possibly referring to the Lola uprights and suspension Workman had fitted to the car. In 1979 the car was sold to Chuck Haines from Can-Am Cars Ltd. He went on a journey to have the car restored to its original specification, which included painting the car in its original colour scheme of yellow with red livery, exactly as it was raced by Vic Elford in 1971. The majority of the work was done by the Symbolic Motor Car Company in San Diego, California. The car was invited to appear at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours dElegance which was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Can-Am. In 2011 the car was sold by Haines to an Australian enthusiast. There is an import approval on file dated 28th June 2011 and the car was subsequently imported here. The car was enjoyed for the next 8 years, which also included a return to Laguna Seca. The car was taken to The Monterey PreReunion and The Rolex Monterey Motorsport Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, California, USA in August 2016. The current owner acquired M8E-80-04 in 2019 and now wants to go in a different direction with his car collection. Today this McLaren M8E presents immaculately and is in race ready condition. Accompanying the car is a massive history file, including lots of period information and photographs. Importantly, the car has a CAMS log book and Certificate of Description (COD) which were issued on the 28th February 2012. The car was validated by Barry Lock, who worked for McLaren from 1967 to 1974 and again briefly in 1975. Barry was heavily involved with the McLaren M8Es and he was one of three McLaren employees who liaised with Trojan, who built the customer cars for McLaren. Barrys Survey Report issued in October 2019 is on file. There is a significant inventory of spare parts, including a spare engine, which can be purchased with the car. McLaren dominated Can-Am racing in the late 1960s and early 1970s and these cars are simply monsters of the track! With essentially no restrictions they were faster than Formula One cars in period. A car of this caliber is seldom offered for sale in Australia. A truly unique opportunity. Highlights: - Purchased new by Roy Woods to compete in the 1971 Can-Am Series. - Raced by Vic Elford with some success finishing 3rd in Round 6 and 4th in Round 7, but damaged in Round 9 of the 1971 Can-Am series and subsequently rebuilt. - Known and documented history passing through a number of owners until restored from 1987 - 1995. - Invited to appear at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. - Australian import approval on file dated 28 June 2011. - CAMS historic log book and COD issued 28th February 2012. - Campaigned at historic motorsports events in Australia 2012 - 2016. - Taken to The Monterey PreReunion and The Rolex Monterey Motorsport Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, California, USA in August 2016. - Sold to the current owner in May 2019. - Car validated by Barry Lock, who worked for McLaren from 1967 to 1974 and again briefly in 1975. Barrys Survey Report issued in October 2019 is on file. There are some fabulous videos of the car online. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlfiT4MRFnM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17-lKnaGbPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_hKUjxYZxI Price $699,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1106672
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2

The Swallow Sidecar Company was founded in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley. In 1934 Lyons formed SS Cars Limited to effectively take over the operation from Walmsley. The SS brand was quite successful; though they had a reputation for having more show than go. The Jaguar name first appeared as a model name on an SS 2½ Litre Sports Saloon introduced in 1936. For political reasons, Lyons changed the name of his company to Jaguar Cars in 1945. Whilst the SS100 is indeed a fabulous car, it was the launch of the legendary Jaguar XK120 at the London Motor Show in 1948 that really put Jaguar on the map. The car caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production. The 120 in its name referred to its 120 mph top speed, which made the XK120 the worlds fastest production car in its day. It was available in two open versions, first as the roadster (designated OTS, for open two-seater), then also as a drophead coupe (DHC) from 1953. The car was also available as a closed or fixed head coupe (FHC) from 1951. The XK120 was succeeded by the XK140 which was launched in late 1954 and sold through until 1957. Whilst the XK140 looked similar to the XK120 there were in fact many subtle and indeed important differences. The XK140 featured a more spacious cabin and had improved brakes, suspension and steering. Visually the car had American style bumpers with overriders, a different grille (that had fewer, thicker vertical bars), a chrome strip on the bonnet & boot and an emblem Jaguar Winner Le Mans 1951-3 on the boot. The final iteration of the XK was the XK150 that was released in 1957. Whilst its family resemblance to its forbearers is obvious the XK150 was in fact a very different car. Most noticeable was the change to a one piece windscreen and the smoother wing line from the front to the rear of the car. Cabin space was significantly improved making the XK150 a far more comfortable car to drive. Mechanically the first XK150s were similar to the XK140s, however, an SE variant with a modified cylinder head giving more power and an S variant with triple SU carburettors giving even more power were soon available. In 1959 engine capacity was increased from 3.4 litres to 3.8 litres. Like the XK120 both the XK140 and XK150 were offered in three body styles being the roadster, drophead coupe and fixed head coupe. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a factory left hand drive 1951 Jaguar XK120 that was delivered new to the north American market. According to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate on file this particular car was completed on the 8th June 1951 and despatched on the 20th June 1951 to Hornborg, Los Angeles in the USA. The car was originally finished in pastel blue with a duo-blue interior and a fawn soft top. The car is documented in the following books: The Jaguar XK120 in the Southern Hemisphere (2009) by John Elmgreen and Terry McGrath. The cars history stated below is an extract from that book: Chassis completed in June 1951 and despatched 20 June 1951 to Hornburg, Los Angeles, California, USA. Sold possibly to Dr E. Charland of Inglewood, California via Cavilar Motors of Los Angeles, California (however, this was not recorded by the factory). In December 1954 the car was sold by him to Edgar Zwieback of 175 Cordova Walk, Long Beach, California, and apparently owned by him at least into the 1970s. Nothing further known until the late 1980s when it was purchased in the USA by Peter Fox of Victoria, and imported into Australia. Said to be part of well-known businessman Lindsay Foxs collection. During the 1990s, the car was completely restored, including being repainted in its original Pastel Blue metallic. In March 2005 it went to auction with Bonhams and Goodmans at the Fox collection site in Docklands, Melbourne and was sold, apparently with just 19 miles recorded since the restoration. Still lhd at that time. Original colours: Pastel Blue, Duo Blue, Fawn. Regd: GGF710 (California, USA), KIF708 (California, USA). This car was one of several XKs purchased by Peter Fox and the second car restored by the Foxes. Terry McGrath. The current owner acquired this STUNNING Jaguar XK120 Roadster in December 2005 following its no sale at the Bonhams & Goodman Sydney auction in March 2005. This car is part of a major collection and it has been used sparingly since being purchased. Today the odometer reads 02715 miles. Its hard to believe that this car was restored in excess of twenty years ago. Granted it has hardly been driven, but everything is still very fresh. Today the car presents beautifully. When you look at this car, with spats fitted and presented in the most perfect colour scheme it is not hard to understand why the world went crazy for the Jaguar XK120 in 1948! The paint work on the car remains excellent all round with the only blemish some crazing where the soft top has rubbed against the body. All of the exterior trim, glass and chrome are also in excellent condition. The only exception being the exhaust tip which shows a few very light spots and there is the odd light scratch or mark on the chrome windscreen frame. Inside the cabin is quite simple, yet it oozes class. The leather remains subtle and clean and all of the instruments & controls (which are working order) are crisp and clear. The carpet has a few bare patches that have most likely been caused by moths. You may notice from the photothat the drivers door pull strap is missing. A replacement has been sourced and will be fitted prior to sale. The engine bay is clean & well presented and the boot looks to be unused. The soft top fits well and is in excellent condition. So whats it like to drive? Its fair to say it drives every bit as good as it looks. The engine starts easily and then it grumbles a little until the automatic choke turns off. It warms up quickly and then its all systems go. You are immediately surprised by the throttle response, which is almost instant. The performance of the car is really good. Everything is tight, just a like a freshly restored car! The gearbox is as smooth as a Moss box can be and the car steers and stops as it should. There is an unused spare wheel, jack and tool kit that will accompany the car. This Jaguar XK120 Roadster ticks all the boxes. The car retains its original matching numbers engine block which is unusual for many XKs. When restored it was finished in its original colour - which is just perfect for the car - and the finishing touch are the spats which complete the look. We have had the pleasure of handling a number of Jaguar XKs over the years and this one is without doubt the very best. Classic Jaguars are in high demand and these early XKs are just so very cool . . . and perhaps this example is the coolest cat of them all! Price: $179,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1056987
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 6,286

1967 Jensen Interceptor (Vignale) Experimental

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1040073
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,781

Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1964 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1078037
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 6,223

1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1092117
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,675

Citroen is one of the worlds most iconic and innovative automobile manufacturers. Founded by André-Gustave Citroen in 1919, the company produced its first motor vehicle, the Citroen Type A, immediately following the First World War. Prior to this and during the War, Citroen supported France by manufacturing armaments from its then modern factory. Throughout the War, Citroen realised that he had to plan for the future and decided he would start manufacturing motor vehicles once peace returned to Europe. In the early years Citroens plans were to bring mass production to Europe using the principles developed by Henry Ford. In 1934 Citroen introduced the 7CV or Traction Avant which today is recognised as one of the most important automobiles ever built. The Traction Avant pioneered unitary body construction (with no separate chassis), four wheel independent suspension and front wheel drive. The early 1930s were tough times for Citroen and the company ultimately filed for bankruptcy in December 1934. Andre Citroen passed away in July 1935 after losing his battle with cancer at the relatively young age of 57. Michelin subsequently took over Citroen and the company went on to become a power house of French industry. The Citroen brand is synonymous with innovation, however, their cars were also well built and very reliable. Other key milestones in Citroens history were the introduction of the Deux Chevaux or 2CV in 1948 and the Goddess DS Series cars in 1955 (which featured a hydro pneumatic self-levelling suspension system, a high-pressure hydraulic system, disc brakes and later, swivelling headlights). What is often overlooked is that Citroen has a rich motorsport pedigree, particularly in rallying, where it has won many events and championships over the years, including the Paris-Dakar rally. Citroen always had a vision to build a sporting version of their iconic DS series cars. The missing piece of the puzzle was found following Citroens acquisition of Maserati in 1968. Citroen decided to use a Maserati engine to power their new sports saloon. The result was the Citroen SM, first shown at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1970. It went on sale in France in September of that year. Citroen only built left hand drive SMs, although right hand drive conversions were done in the UK and Australia. The SM was a success for Citroen with 12,920 examples built from 1970 through until 1975. The majority of the cars were built in 1971 and 1972. The oil crisis in 1973 and Citroens bankruptcy in 1974 ultimately led to the demise of the SM. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a rare and unique Citroen SM. This particular car was built in May 1972 and it is understood to have been sold new in Canada. This Euro spec 6 headlight car has the SB chassis number prefix which designates the car has the 2.7 litre engine (with carburettors) and it has the desirable five speed manual gearbox. Interestingly, this combination offers far greater performance than the 3.0 litre engine with automatic gearbox. The car is finished in 'gris nacré' (AC095) with a black interior. Not much is known about the early days of its life in Canada. In 1986 the car was sold to Andrew Lonseth from Alberta and at that time an appraisal was done by Little Lot Appraisals in Edmonton, Alberta. The appraisal mentions the car had recently been repainted and the odometer was 75,253 km which was believed to be the actual mileage for the car. Photos on file from when the appraisal was done shows the car was glacier blue at that time. Lonseth owned the car for about 16 years. During that time, he moved from Canada to Bainbridge Island, Washington, USA and he took the car with him. The US title on file shows the car was registered as 400 GPL. Unfortunately, swivelling headlights are illegal in the US and it is understood they were disconnected at that time. In 2002 Lonseth sold the car to Mark McKibbin from Warrabul, Victoria, Australia. At that time the odometer was c98,000 km. Before the car was shipped to Australia it was given a major service, all the fluids were replaced and a new rotary air conditioning assembly was installed. This work was completed by Chris Middleton in Seattle. In 2010 the car was given a mechanical overhaul and the engine was rebuilt. At that time the mileage was around 100,000 miles. The job to rebuild the engine was given to Spyder Automobiles from Warragul in Victoria. The car changed hands in 2011/12 and headed to its new owner in Brisbane, Queensland. The car was regularly maintained throughout his ownership. A new clutch was installed in 2014 and a new gearbox was installed in 2018. The current owner purchased the car in 2018 and at that time the odometer read 110,256 km. During his ownership he has continued to improve the car. The interior was given a refresh, the carburettors where rebuilt and some cosmetic work undertaken. Today this car presents really well and it is just fabulous to drive. Driving a Citroen SM is a unique experience and this car certainly doesnt disappoint. Not surprisingly, the starting procedure for the SM is basically the same as the Maserati Merak. Turn the key to energise the fuel pumps and get fuel into the carburettors, pull out the choke, three pumps on the throttle and then turn the key. This SM starts easily from cold and soon settles into a smooth idle. The hydraulic system charges quickly and the car raises itself to the correct ride height. Its quirky, but very cool! Oldtimer Australia has had the pleasure to handle the sale of a number of Citroen SMs and this car is perhaps the best driving example weve had. As youd expect given the relatively recent rebuild, the engine feels strong and the manual gearbox is smooth. The suspension on these Citroens is unlike anything you will find on any other car. This car just glides along the road. The suspension absorbs just about anything theroad surface can throw up without any noticeable change in the ride. You can even drive over a speed bump without slowing down and hardly notice a change in the ride. One can only imagine what it would be like to ride a magic carpet . . . perhaps as smooth as driving a Citroen SM! The steering on a Citroen SM is another unique and interesting feature. All SMs have the DIRAVI system installed. DIRAVI stands for direction à rappel asservi which means steering with controlled return or more generally power steering with power assisted return. The advantages of the system are that an irregular road surface will not affect the steering, minimal physical exertion is required to turn the steering wheel, its very fast and it only takes two turns from lock to lock. The directness of the steering and the power assisted return do take a little bit of getting used to, as do the sensitive stop/go brakes. That said, you get the hang of it quickly and the self-centring steering is actually really good. After a few miles you think to yourself . . . I really get this car! The ride and drive on this car is difficult to fault. The V6 Maserati engine has enough power on tap to push you back in the seat under acceleration and the brakes are more than capable of pulling the car up quickly and ina straight line. The car has some creature comforts, including an air conditioning system that blows cold air and a brand new Alpine stereo with Bluetooth capability and a Kenwood subwoofer. The car presents well and medium grey (gris nacre) is a perfect colour for an SM. The paintwork on this car is in good condition for its age. There are few minor blemishes and stone chips here and there, consistent with a car that is used as its makers intended . . . and that is to be driven! The external trim is in good condition, though there is some very light pitting in some of the chrome and there is a nick in the front (rubber) bumper. The glass is crisp and clear though the front windscreen appears to have had a stone chip repair at some stage. The interior presents well, with the slightest amount of patina. The front seats, which were recently reupholstered, are firm and the leather is in excellent condition. The rear seats show some light wear, but there are no splits or tears. The carpets were also recently replaced and are in excellent condition. You will often see a cracked dash on a Citroen SM, however, the dash in this car is in very good condition. All instruments appear to be in good working order. Under the bonnet it is clean, neat and tidy. The boot, which was also recently recarpeted is in very good condition. There is a spare wheel and tool kit present. The car has all its ID tags in place, including the body number tag, chassis number tag and body paint code tag which reads AC095, confirming the car was originally painted in 'gris nacré'. Accompanying this car is a thick history file dating back to the mid 1980s (including an original Washington title), historical documentation and a factory owners manual. The car is really an engineering masterpiece. It looks like nothing else (except a Citroen!), it is technologically brilliant and is perhaps best described as a sporting Rolls-Royce. Driving an SM is a unique experience and owning one should be on everyones bucket list! Today the odometer reads 15,489 km. Highlights: - Desirable Euro spec version with 5 speed manual gearbox. - Well documented service history. - Hydraulic system is in good working order. - Almost $25,000 spent on the car by the current owner. - Well presented in a stunning colour combination. - Mechanically sorted and ready for its next owner to use and enjoy. Price $99,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1061054
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,926

Apple, Coco-Cola, McDonalds and Nike are brands recognisable the world over. So is Ferrari and interestingly the iconic Italian luxury sports car manufacturer was named The Worlds Strongest Brand in the 2019 Brand Finance Global 500 Report. Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 out of Alfa Romeos race division as Auto Avio Costruzioni the company built its first car in 1940. The Second World War halted Ferraris dream, which was finally realised in 1947, when the first car bearing his name, the Ferrari 125 S, was built. From that day on Ferrari race cars dominated the world over, winning race after race and many world championships in Formula One, sports car racing and endurance racing. Ferrari built exclusive sports cars for the road too, but in the early days, this was primarily to fund his motor racing! The Cavallino Rampate or prancing horse was the symbol chosen by Ferrari and like the golden arches it is recognised by just about every man, woman and child on the planet! The Ferrari road cars from the 1940s and early to mid-1950s were built in very small numbers and it was not until the introduction of the 250 series cars that production numbers increased. Almost 1,000 Ferrari 250 GTEs were built from 1959 1963. The 250 series also produced some of the most special Ferraris ever built, including the Ferrari 250 LM, 250 SWB, 250 California Spider and of course the 250 GTO. The 250 series cars were superseded by the 275 series cars, the 330 series cars and later the 365 series cars. The nomenclature designated the cubic capacity of each cylinder. So a Ferrari 330 was powered by a 12 cylinder engine of 3967cc capacity. Ferraris iconic Dino was first shown to the world as a prototype at the 1965 Paris Motor Show. The car morphed into the 206 GT of which only 150 cars were built from 1967 to 1969. In 1969 the 246 GT was released, which whilst a similar looking car in many ways was actually quite different. The car sat 3 taller than its predecessor and the body was nowbuilt from steel. Mechanically the new car was powered by a 2418cc V6 engine. Enzo was keen to tackle Porsche head on and to do this he needed to increase production. The Dino was a hit and circa 4,000 of these cars (both the 246 GT and 246 GTS) were built from 1969 to 1974. At the 1975 Paris Motor Show, Ferrari introduced its new model, the Pininfarina designed 308 GTB. The 308 GTB was introduced as a supplement to the Bertone shaped 308 GT4 2+2 and a direct replacement for the Dino 246 GT. The 308 GTB received rave reviews from the motoring press and it was an instant success. The Dino 246 GT fans were pleased to see some of the design elements from the Dino carried across, such as the scalloped air intakes on the side panels, the twin tail lights and the recessed curved window glass. At the same time, it was definitely a modern design. Carrozzeria Scaglietti was responsible for the bodywork, however there was a slight difference compared to previous models. The 308 GTB was the first production Ferrari to be produced with a fibreglass body (or glass-reinforced plastic, GRP), except for the front bonnet, which was made out of aluminium. There are various arguments as to why Ferrari chose fibreglass for its new model but the general consensus is Ferrari was disappointed with the sales results of the Dino 308 GT4 and wanted to speed up the production of the new car to offset lost sales to competitors such as Porsche, Maserati, Lamborghini and Lotus. It was also quicker and easier to make moulds for fibreglass construction than dies for metal pressings. Using fibreglass also helped to keep the weight down. In fact, the 308 GTB only weighs 1,050kg. Its debatable exactly how many fibreglass Ferrari 308 GTBs were built. The most often stated numbers are 712 and 808, of which perhaps 150 were right hand drive. It is understood thatFerrari switched to steel bodies (in June 1977) for commercial reasons. The Italian translation of fibreglass is vetroresina, which is the nomenclature often used for these cars. The first 308 GTBs were powered by a three litre V8 engine with a dry sump. Countries that had more stringent emission control standards at the time, such as the USA and Australia, received wet sump cars only. Later on, all 308 GTBs had wet sump engines. In 1977 Ferrari introduced the 308 GTS, which was essentially the same car with a targa roof. The car was made famous through its appearance in the TV show Magnum PI. The model evolved into the 308 GTBi / 308 GTSi in 1980 when Bosch K-Jetronic mechanical fuel injection replaced the traditional Weber carburettors. Two years later the four valves per cylinder Quattrovalvole or QV was introduced. The 308 was an incredible success and circa 12,000 cars were built from 1975 to 1985 before the 328 was introduced. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a very special Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina. This particular car is confirmed as the very first UK delivered, factory right hand drive 308 GTB ever built. Documentation on file from the Maranello Concessionaires Archives confirms that this car was ordered on the 19th September 1975 and specified as rosso chiaro (20-R-190) with a beige leather interior (VM3234) and beige carpets. The car was ordered with electric windows, tinted glass, a heated rear window, leather trim and air conditioning. The car was delivered on EE plates ex Maranello and we assume driven back to the UK. The documentation on file notes this car as a Maranello Concessionaires Demo or Press car and it was first registered in the UK as MPH70P. The original service book states a delivery date of the 27th May 1976. The cars first service is dated 1st June 1976 at 959 miles and that mileage would be the road trip from Maranello in Italy to Maranello Concessionaires in the UK. This very car was featured in a number of motoring publications including Autocar (issue 23rd October 1976) and Motor (issue 11th September 1976). It was also featured on the cover of a 1980 Eurovox car calendar. Unfortunately, little is known of the cars subsequent early history until it found its way to Australia, most likely in the early 1980s. The car was owned for many years by journalist Bruce Webster who predominantly used the car for track days and tarmac rallies. Unfortunately in Websters ownership the car suffered a catastrophic engine failure at a race meet in the 1980s. The original dry sump engine was replaced by a wet sump engine. The car changed hands in 2000 and its new owners took a still relatively standard 308 GTB and modified it further to improve its performance. The car competed in the Australian Tarmac Championship and rallies such as Targa Tasmania (13 times), Targa Wrest Point (6 times), Targa High Country Mt Buller (3 times), Alpine Classic and others. In 2011 the car finished a very credible 19th outright and 1st in class at Targa Tasmania, taking care of the early Porsche 911s and BDA Escorts! In 2014 the car suffered an off at Targa Tasmania resulting in some front end panel damage. That turned out to be the end of a very successful tarmac rally career for this 308 GTB and the car was subsequently sold. Given the soaring values of all classic Ferraris and the significance of this car, its new owner decided to restore it back to road going guise and to how it was delivered to Maranello Concessionaires back on the 27th May 1976. The only exception was that he chose to restore the car with a deep front spoiler, which was an option back in the day. The original front spoiler will accompany the car. His most important task was to source a correct dry sump engine for the car which he was able to do. Today this Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina presents and drives exceptionally well. The body was completely stripped and professionally restored. There was no choice but to finish the car in its original and classical colour of rosso chiaro! Even though the car was painted some years ago it has not been used since it was restored and as a result the paint work remains fresh and vibrant with a strong depth of colour. All of the exterior trim, badges, bumpers, lenses and the glass are in excellent condition. Importantly the car sits on original 14 wheels with correct Michelin XWX tyres, which give the car a perfect stance. You open the door to reveal an interior that presents beautifully. The seats and door cards have been re-upholstered and the work was done to a very high standard. The car has new carpets throughout, including the boot. The original steering wheel, all of the instruments and controls are in good condition and everything looks to be in working order. After getting comfortable behind the wheel, its time to bring that V8 engine to life. Turn the ignition on and let the fuel pump do its work, then turn the key and with a short blip of the accelerator pedal the V8 bursts to life. The car starts easily and quickly settles into a smooth idle. We love the exhaust note of a 308 GTB . . . it is loud but in a refined way! After waiting (impatiently!) for a few minutes for the car to warm up, its time to take it out on the road. This 308 GTB does not disappoint. In fact, it is absolutely fabulous to drive! The engine feels strong and it revs freely throughout the rev range. The gated shifter is a feature on these 308s and it lets you move the gear lever through the gears with great precision. The gearbox is smooth and shifting up and down is easy. Out on the open road this 308 is a real pleasure to drive. Its handling is exactly what you expect from a Ferrari 308 GTB. It is nimble and precise. It simply goes where you want it to go and it stops when you want it to stop. You get used to this car very quickly. It is very easy to drive, and that exhaust note . . . theres no need for a radio in this 308! It just begs to be driven. The air conditioning system has been disconnected. There is a compressor complete with brackets and a new condenser (which is almost impossible to find) that will accompany the car. As mentioned previously, this car has not been used since it was restored. It certainly needs to be driven and on every outing weve had with the car it gets better and better the more you drive it. The car will require a final tune which will be done prior to delivery to its new owner. The car does not have a thick history file, but importantly it does have its book set, including its original warranty card, in the Ferrari leather wallet. There is also a correct, complete tool kit, jack kit, space saver spare wheel, safety triangle and accessory light. Highlights: - Confirmed as the very first UK delivered, factory right hand drive Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina built. - The Maranello Concessionaires Demo or Press car. - Featured in period car magazines. - Finished in its original colour scheme of rosso chiaro with a beige interior. - The car has recently been restored and it presents and drives fabulously. - Accompanied by books, including the original warranty card, tools and a jack kit. - The car is ready to be enjoyed by its next owner. These fibreglass bodied Ferrari 308 GTBs were built in relatively small numbers and they are now highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts the world over. The odometer reads 10,151 miles. Price: AUD $237,500.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1114739
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2

1969 Maserati Ghibli

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1104202
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 5,424

Cadillac is one of the oldest motor vehicle manufacturers in the world. When Henry Ford had a dispute with his investors in March 1902, he, together with several of his key partners left the Henry Ford Company. Two of Fords financial backers William Murphy and Lemuel Bowen approached Henry M Leyland of the Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing Company to assess the value of the remaining assets and prepare the company for liquidation. Leland, however, convinced them to continue the company and on 22nd August 1902 the Cadillac Automobile Company was founded. The company was named after the French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, who had founded the city of Detroit back in 1701. The first Cadillacs, the Runabout and the Tonneau were built in late 1902 and shown to the public at the New York Auto Show in January 1903. Their cars received rave reviews and even back then Cadillacs differentiator was quality, which is how the brand has been recognised ever since. In 1909 Cadillac was acquired by General Motors and has always been the flagship in the GM stable of car manufacturers. Prior to World War II Cadillac was a market leader of mass-produced luxury cars. In the 1930s, Cadillac added cars with V12 and V16 engines to their range, many of which were fitted with custom coach-built bodies. Cadillacs of this era were often referred to as American Rolls-Royces. The 1950s and 1960s were good times for the American automobile industry. The United States became the world's largest manufacturer of automobiles and the car had a significant influence on American culture. Fast food, rock 'n' roll, American diners, drive-in movies and of course cars were 'very cool'. One of Cadillacs most popular models was the Series 62, built from 1940 through until 1964. The first generation Series 62 was built between 1940 and 1941, the second generation between 1942 and 1947, the third generation between 1948 and 1953, the fourth generation between 1954 and 1956, the fifth generation between 1957 and 1958, the sixth generation between 1959 and 1960 and the final, seventh generation between 1961 and 1964. In 1949 the newly launched automotive magazine Motor Trend choose the Cadillac Series 62 as their first ever Car of the Year. The Series 62 built from 1950 to 1953 is considered by many to be Cadillacs post-war pinnacle of excellence. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible. The original build record on file confirms the car is style number 53-6267X which is a 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible. It was invoiced on the 30th April 1953 and sold through the authorised Cadillac distributor in St Louis, Missouri, USA. The sale price is noted as US $3,564.39. The colour code is noted as 1 = black and the trim code 548 where 5 = tan (soft top) & 48 = red leather. Some of the option codes are difficult to read, however, it has S = power steering, D = chrome wheel discs and Y = Vanity mirror. The body name plate is present on this car and everything matches with the build record sheet. The car has had an engine change at some stage in its life, which is apparently quite common for these cars. The engine in the car is a period correct engine for a 1953 Cadillac. Little is known about this cars early history. The current owner acquired the car in Michigan, USA back in 2009 and subsequently imported it into Australia. There is a Michigan title on file in the name of the previous owner. The Australian Import Approval is dated 12th January 2010. The current owner had a vision to restore a 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible to the highest possible standard. He was fussy and wanted a black car with a red interior and a car that had to be complete and in good condition. There is correspondence on file between the current and previous owner discussing the car which confirms that it was purchased as a mechanically sound, nice driver. There are photos on file showing the condition of the car as purchased and others showing some of the work completed by the previous owner. The car he found ticked all those boxes and soon after arriving into Australia it was sent to restoration specialist Justin Hills of Hills & Co Customs in Taree, NSW. The car was converted to right hand drive and restored to the highest possible standard. Once the body was complete, the car was sent to Annvid Auto Upholsterers in Capalaba (Brisbane) for a complete retrim and a new soft top. The engine was completely rebuilt by JB Automotive in Ayr, north Queensland. The final job was to fit a new stainless steel exhaust system to the car. The restoration was completed by the end of 2011 and the car was registered in QLD. This was a no expense spared restoration and there are receipts on file for almost $350,000. This 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible has been hardly used since it was restored. It has travelled less than 500 miles in the last 10 years. As a result the car today presents like a freshly restored car. The paint work is exceptional and a credit to Justin Hills and his team of master craftsmen. Black is a difficult colour at the best of time, however, this is an enormous car and the paintwork remains vibrant with a very high gloss finish. You have to look really hard to find any imperfections. The same is true for the chrome work which is a real feature on this car. The rest of the exterior trim, the wheels and the glass are also in excellent condition. The soft top remains like new and looks to have never been used. Not surprisingly, the engine bay and the boot are also immaculate. You open the massive door and slide behind the steering wheel and immediately you feel like youve taken a step back in time. Everything looks, feels and smells exactly the way it would have done when this car left the factory in 1953, and perhaps better! The interior of this car is quite simply stunning! The red leather upholstery, the carpets, the instruments and controls are all like new. Even the painted dashboard looks like new. There are no scratches or discolouration due to the sunlight and the paint presents like it does on the rest of the car it is immaculate. The steering wheel itself is a work of art! It presents beautifully in red and white and the Cadillac logo being the feature. The instrument cluster is simple, yet functional. Everything you need is right in front of you. As you would expect from a car like this, there is a lot of chrome inside the car as well. Most of the switches are chrome and they create a prefect contrast with the red interior. Incredibly, for a car built in 1953 everything is electric, or more precisely operated by Cadillacs complex Hydro-Lectric system. The windows, the soft top and even the seats are electric and they are all in perfect working order. After having admired the interior for a while its time to take the car out for a drive. The car is fitted with an immobiliser and after deactivating it you pump the accelerator two or three times, turn the key and the 331 cubic inch V8 engine quietly comes to life and almost immediately settles into a smooth idle. This is exactly what you would expect from a car like this. This car is fitted with a Hydramatic transmission, which in the 1940s and 1950s was the best automatic transmission available. In 1952 Rolls-Royce even acquired a license to produce them for their Rolls-Royce and Bentley automobiles. After getting comfortable it is time to hit the road. You gently move the gear lever on the column to DR for Drive, gently touch the accelerator and the car will just glide forward. Out on the road this car is just so nice to drive. Make no mistake this is a big and heavy car, yet the ride is incredibly smooth. After a few miles you are comfortable behind the wheel and whilst there is no doubt youare driving a car from days gone by, the sheer size of the car disappears. The automatic transmission is incredibly smooth and the engine has sufficient power to take the c2,300 kg car quickly to an acceptable cruising speed. We love the spot lights which are a fabulous finishing touch to the car. One feature on this car we havent mentioned is the radio. This has been discretely upgraded and there is an iPod hidden in the glove box with about 2000 period songs for your listening pleasure. Select the song to suite your mood and you will time warp back to Hollywood in 1953! The car has an owners manual, shop manual, a lever arch file of Cadillac information, an original sales brochure and an extensive file of receipts from the restoration. The car has hardly been used since it was restored and the owner has decided it is now time for someone else to enjoy this beautiful car. Today the odometer reads 81,008 miles. If you are looking for a nice Cadillac Series 62 then this is not the car for you. If you are looking for one of the very best 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertibles money can buy then please enquire. Highlights: - Desirable third generation Cadillac Series 62 convertible. - Restored to an incredibly high standard in its original colour scheme. - Converted to right hand drive, making it a more usable classic on Australian roads. - Just a STUNNING motor car! Price $239,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA753617
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 998

1929 Morgan Super Sports Aero 3 Wheeler

CALL 07 3171 1953
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