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  • RefCode: TA1108766
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2

Following the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, Europes car industry was decimated. In Germany both Daimler and Benz went back to producing cars post-war, however, times were tough. A merger between Daimler and Benz would ensure that both companies survived and following a technical co-operation agreement in 1924, the companies formally merged on the 1st July 1926. Mercedes-Benz was born! Subsequently, Mercedes-Benz went on to build some of the greatest cars of all time. The cars from Stuttgart bearing the three-pointed star all had one thing in common . . . they were renowned for their technical innovation, build quality, luxury and performance. In 1951 Mercedes-Benz introduced the Type W187 220 Series cars, which was the first model to be powered by a six-cylinder engine post World War II. This model was a great success and built in relatively big numbers. In the 1950s Mercedes-Benz produced one of the greatest cars of all time the iconic 300SL Gullwing and 300SL Roadster. Whilst fabulous sporting cars, they were very expensive and generally sold to the rich and famous. The Type W186 and Type W189 300 series four door luxury tourers were built alongside the Type W198 300SL Gullwing and Roadster and they were indeed fabulous cars in their own right, though still very expensive. Mercedes-Benz wanted to build full sized luxury cars that were more affordable than the Type W186 and Type W189 300 series cars, so the Ponton range of cars (Type W120/W121/W105/W180/W128) filled that void nicely. In 1959 Mercedes-Benz introduced the Type W111 as a successor to the very successful Ponton. The Type W111 was built as a sedan, coupe and convertible with many different engine configurations. The sedans were sold in big numbers all over the world, however, as has been the tradition with Mercedes-Benz the two door and convertible cars were built in far smaller numbers and carried a significant price premium. The majority of the Type W111 models were powered by a six-cylinder engine of varying capacity, ranging from 2195cc (220 series) through to 2778cc (280 series). In 1969 Mercedes-Benz introduced a new 3499cc V8 engine which they fitted to the Type W111 coupes and cabriolets. In total, Mercedes-Benz built 28,918 Type W111/Type W112 coupes. One of the rarest models was 280 SE, which was powered by a 6 cylinder 2,778cc engine. In total, 3,797 280 SEs were built, of which only 150 were factory right hand drive. It is understood that only 56 cars were delivered new in Australia. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a beautiful and rare Australian delivered, factory right hand drive 1969 Mercedes 280 SE Coupe. The car retains its original book set and the service book confirms this is a matching numbers car. The option code plate confirms this car remains in its STUNNING original colour, 'bronze brown metallic' (colour code 461). It also confirms that the car was originally equipped with Behr air conditioning (option code 306), has power steering with floor shift automatic transmissi on (option code 426) and this is an Australian delivered car (option code 625). This particular example was delivered new to AR Green in Launceston, Tasmania on 1st May 1969 and was first registered as WGM 444. Its understood Green kept the car until either late 1981 or early 1982. By that time the car had travelled around 41,000 miles according to its service book. The car then found its way to Melbourne and it was registered in Victoria as BGQ 913. The car was used sparingly before changing hands again in 1984. The service book confirms the mileage around the time of sale at 83,958 genuine miles. It remained in Melbourne and with its then owner through until 1997. At some stage during this ownership the registration was changed into DJH 470. The car was then sold through Shannons in February 2005 and at that time the odometer showed 116,459 miles. In 2013 the car changed hands again and it found its way to Sydney where it was registered on club registration as 60856H. A prepurchase inspection was done and the invoice for that notes the mileage as 131,686 miles. The current owner acquired the car in mid 2019, where it joined an eclectic and significant collection of cars. There is an extensive history file with this car. There are receipts dating back to 1983 and the service book has been religiously and meticulously stamped from the day the car was delivered to its first owner back in 1969. The receipts confirm the engine was rebuilt in December 1997 by R&M Boys Pty Ltd at 85,312 miles. The gearbox was replaced in October 2000 with a reconditioned second hand unit. From August October 2006 the car was given a refresh. The interior was restored by Australian Leather Restorations and a number of other miscellaneous jobs done to improve the overall presentation of the car. Most notably the front grill and headlight surrounds were rechromed. Today this car presents beautifully. The Paul Bracq designed Type W111 coupes are elegant and timeless works of art. However, colour maketh the car and a 'bronze brown metallic' Mercedes-Benz 280 SE Coupe is about as good as it gets in our opinion! The paint work is bright and it has a deep gloss finish. From say a meter it looks exceptional, however, on a closer inspection there are a few scratches, defects and small stone chips which have been touched up. The glass, chrome and the lights/lenses are all in good condition. The panel gaps are excellent and everything opens and closes exactly as they should on a very well cared for classic Mercedes-Benz. The interior of a 1960s Benz is businesslike but like the exterior, also very elegant. You slide in behind the steering wheel and cant help but be impressed with you surroundings. Everything just feels right. The seemingly delicate white steering wheel contrasts the timberwork perfectly. The upholstery, carpets, head lining and timberwork are all in very good condition and essentially like new. The internal door handles and grab handles look to be original and are showing some wear. The instruments and controls are all crisp & clean and in working order. Whilst the air conditioning is working, the air is not as cold as it should be, so it most likely needs a regas. The car has lap seat belts fitted front and rear. The engine bay is very clean and well presented. The boot looks to be original and remains neat and tidy. There is a boot mat, spare wheel and jack. Driving a Mercedes 280 SE is an experience. Turn the key and the engine fires up straight away. This lovely old Mercedes-Benz has the desirable four speed floor shift automatic transmission, so select drive and away you go. Out on the open road you quickly forget you are driving a 52 year old car. Everything is so refined. The car just goes about its business in a very businesslike yet very relaxed manner. The ride is smooth and the car just glides along the road without any fuss. The power steering is perfectly balanced its not too light and its not too heavy. You turn the steering wheel and the car just follows in the direction you want it to go. Similarly, apply the brakes and the car pulls up in a very considered manner. It is all class! The engine feels strong, the gearbox changes gears smoothly and you feel very comfortable in the car. Despite its age this car has no issue keeping up with modern day traffic and would have no problem driving from Brisbane to Sydney. Today the odometer reads 34,607, which the service book confirms as 134,607 genuine miles. The car has sat in a static collection for some time. Whilst its starts easily and drives well it would benefit from a service. The car is now ready for a new owner who, we are sure, will enjoy driving this car. Highlights: Australian delivered, factory right hand drive example. Matching numbers. Full books, including a stamped service book from day one. Finished in the most STUNNING and original colour scheme of 'bronze brown metallic' (colour code 461) with a cream interior. Factory Behr air conditioning (option code 306) & power steering with floor shift automatic transmission (option code 426). Travelled only c135,000 miles from new. A beautifully presented and driving example. Price $169,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1114739
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2

1969 Maserati Ghibli

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1095674
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 4
  • Capacity - cc: 2,496

1966 Mercedes-Benz 250SE Sedan

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1109738
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: 2

The Porsche story is a fascinating one and its roots go back to the 1930s when Professor Ferdinand Porsche was instrumental in the design of the first Volkswagen and also Auto Union race cars. By 1939 he had built three Porsche cars to compete in the 800-mile race from Berlin to Rome. Unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to the war and Porsche was forced to focus on supporting the German war effort, however, he had always wanted to build his own cars. In 1944 Porsche was forced to leave Stuttgart and he set up a small operation in Gmünd, Austria. Soon after the Porsche family and many of their engineers were captured and sent to jail. Ferdinand Porsches son. Ferdinand junior, or Ferry as he was known, was released six months later and he returned to Gmünd to rebuild the family company. Things moved quickly and Porsche was involved with cars again and in mid-1948 the first Porsche 356 was built. It is understood Porsche built some 50 hand built aluminium bodied cars in their small factory at Gmünd before relocating back to Stuttgart, Germany. The rest as they say is history as the 356 evolved into one of the most successful sports cars ever built. A hard act to follow indeed . . . but its replacement, the Porsche 911 went on to become a legend! Ferry Porsche decided that he would be able to increase sales of his cars by winning races on the track. This was a big decision and arguably one of the most strategic and important decisions in Porsches rich history. In 1951 Porsche entered two modified 356s in the Le Mans 24 hours. This would be the third running of the French endurance race since the end of the Second World War. Interestingly, Porsche was the first German motor manufacturer to enter the race after the War. The Porsche 356 SL as it was designated was specifically adapted to the needs of motor racing. It had an all alloy body, the fuel tank capacity was increased, and to speed up refuelling the filler neck protruded through the bonnet. One of the cars was badly damaged in practice so only one car made it to the start line. Driven by the French Porsche importer Auguste Veuillet and co-driver Edmonde Mouche, this 356 SL ended up winning its class. 1953 saw the birth of a Porsche specifically designed for motor racing, the 550 Spyder. It had a lightweight yet rigid steel frame chassis made from steel tubing and a streamlined, stylish body. The engine was located behind the driver but before the rear axle. The car was officially launched at the1953 Paris Motor Show to critical acclaim. It then made a very successful race debut, winning the Nurburgring Eifel Race in May 1953.The Porsche 550 Spyder was raced with great success the world over, however, it wasnt until 1956 that Porsche actually won a major event. A Porsche 550A Spyder, which was even lighter and had a more rigid spaceframe chassis than its predecessor, won the 1956 Sicilian Targa Florio, beating Ferraris and Maseratis. The 550 was both a road car and a track car and it wasnt uncommon for privateers to drive the Spyder to the track, race it and then drive it home again. These privateers also kept racing the 550 when Porsche moved on and built the 718. The Porsche 550 Spyder also became famous for a not so good reason. Actor James Dean had only just taken delivery of his 550 when on his way to his first race in it, he was involved in a catastrophic collision and was killed at the young age of 24. In 1957 Porsche released the 718 RSK which was a further development of the 550A Spyder. This car continued Porsches significant success on the race track. In 1958 a Porsche 718 finished first in class and third overall at Le Mans as well as achieving second at the Targa Florio. In 1959 a Porsche 718, driven by Edgar Barth and Wolfgang Seidel, claimed overall victory at the Targa Florio. A 718 also won the European Hill Climb Championship in both 1958 and 1959. In 1958 Porsche 718s were entered in Formula 2 and they achieved immediate success winning races in 1958 and continued their winning way in 1959 and 1960. Formula One switched to a 1.5 litre formula in 1961 and Porsche entered three 718s for Dan Gurney, Hans Herrmann and Jo Bonnier. Gurney scored three 2nd places (France, Italy and United States) taking him to 4th place in the Drivers Championship. In 1961 a 718/4 RS Spyder achieved a class win at Le Mans. Despite its popularity only 90 Porsche 550 / 550A Spyders and only 35 of the 718 RSK Spyders were ever built. These cars have become hugely collectable and as a result, are very difficult to find and very expensive to buy. This has resulted in these Porsches becoming one of the most frequently reproduced classic cars. Over the years various companies have offered either kits, complete replicas or recreations to the general public. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1985 Porsche 550 / 718 Spyder replica. It is understood that this car is one of a small number of cars built by Spyder Conversions who were based in Boronia in Melbournes eastern suburbs. The cars were sold as the Spyder RSK. The back story is an interesting one. The Spyder RSK was featured in the October / November 1985 issue of Sports Car World magazine. In summary, Victorian businessman Richard Raftes saw a Porsche 718 Spyder Replica whilst visiting the UK and fell in love with it. He decided to set up his own company to produce an Australian built Porsche 550 / 718 Spyder Replica. He partnered with pal Roger Tomlinson and Spyder Conversions was born. Neither one had experience building cars, but their lack of experience was compensated by a lot of enthusiasm and desire to succeed! The UK replicas where all built on a shortened VW Beetle chassis and Spyder Conversions intended to use the same for their cars as well. However, after the completion of their first car, obtaining type approval in Australia turned out to be a problem. Basically, the shortened chassis made it impossible to get a proper approval to produce the car in larger numbers. So it was back to the drawing board. It was ultimately decided to start from scratch, this time on a full length VW Beetle chassis. New body moulds were made using a wooden buck. In Sports Car Worlds road test of the Spyder Conversion they state this car can seriously be regarded as an affordable and very ownable proposition at a price where sports cars are as rare as hens teeth. The same article states that at the time of writing 10 kits and 2 complete cars had been sold. The car being tested was the third complete car built. The car offered for sale has been used as a static display for pretty much all its life which explains why the odometer only shows 86 km. Given the mileage it is not surprising that this car presents like new. The silver paintwork is immaculate as is the red interior. Everything looks to be in working order and the car has recently passed a Queensland roadworthy inspection and it has been road registered in Queensland. Prior to this, the car was last registered in Victoria in 1992 and it carried the number plate DKV966. This car is powered by an upgraded twin port VW Beetle engine, most likely 1600cc in capacity. Prior to being offered for sale the car has been recommissioned and today it runs and drives well. The engine has plenty of power & it revs willingly, the gearbox is relatively smooth and the car is surprisingly tight on the road. It is incredibly light and nimble to drive. The car would benefit from having new slimline race style seats installed. The current bucket seats are very comfortable, but they are thick and currently provide an awkward driving position. You sit way too high in the car. Highlights: - A unique Australian designed and built Porsche 550 / 718 Spyder replica - Essentially a new car with only 85 km on the odometer. - With VW mechanicals the car is easy to maintain. Price: $99,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1087759
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,929

The Lamborghini story is fascinating in itself but for the company to have survived all these years and indeed celebrate its 50th Anniversary in 2013 is quite amazing. Ferruccio Lamborghini was an entrepreneur, a very successful businessman and a lover of the finer things in life, including sports cars. He was fortunate enough to own some wonderful cars including Ferraris however, he found fault with them all. According to the legend following a meeting with Enzo Ferrari to discuss some of the short comings of his cars Enzo dismissed Ferruccio and he subsequently decided that he could build a better car. Not long after, in May 1963, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SPA was established and the small town of Sant'Agata Bolognese, located between Modena and Bologna, was chosen as the location to build the factory. Born under the Zodiac sign Taurus Lamborghini chose the raging bull as the emblem for his sports cars. Lamborghini knew what he wanted and he put together a highly skilled team. His first car, the 350 GTV was shown at the Turin Motor Show in October 1963. This car received mixed reviews, however, Lamborghini was not deterred and made a number of improvements and design changes to this original concept. The first Lamborghini production car, the 350 GT, left the factory in mid 1964. The 350 GT evolved into the 400 GT 2+2 and later the Islero. In parallel to building these classic front engine V12 GT cars Lamborghini wanted to build a super car, enter the Miura first shown as a rolling chassis in 1965, and also a GT car that could comfortably seat four people, enter the Espada in 1968. The mid to late sixties were good times for Lamborghini and his cars were revered the world over. One of Lamborghinis biggest markets was the USA and he needed to redesign the Islero to comply with strict new design rules. Ferruccio decided to commission a new car and so the Jarama (pronounced Yah-rah-mah) was born. Named after a district in Spain renowned for breeding fighting bulls the Jarama was first shown at the 1970 Geneva Motor Show. The car designed by Bertones Marcello Gandini was unique but compared to many other Lamborghinis quite subtle or even understated in its design, which is exactly what Lamborghini wanted. According to the numbers only 327 Jaramas were built. Of these, 177 were the 'standard' Jarama produced from 1970 to 1972 and 150 were the Jarama S produced from 1972 to 1975, though many completed cars were sold post 1975. It is understood that circa 23 right hand drive cars were built, comprising of 5 Jaramas and 18 Jarama S (or GTS). Of the 5 right hand drive Jaramas built, 2 were UK delivered, 2 Singapore delivered and the other was Australian delivered. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale this spectacular and extremely rare right hand drive Lamborghini Jarama. The factory records confirm this car was completed on the 6th August 1971 and delivered to Lamborghini London. The car is noted as being 'rosso alfa' (red) with a 'nero' (black) interior. It was delivered new with air conditioning. Whilst this car is 1 of the 2 UK delivered right hand drive Jaramas, it was purchased new in the UK by an Australian, Graeme Cook, who imported it here in late 1971. The current Victorian Registration documents note that the car was complianced in 01/1972. Cook owned the car a short time then sold it to Michael Abon, an owner of BP service stations in Melbourne. The current owner first acquired this Lamborghini Jarama in 1975. At that time he purchased the car from Chris Smith, who was a car broker, sports car / historic race driver and motor racing commentator. Smith was understood to have owned the car for some 18 months. The car was enjoyed for 5 years before it was sold in 1980 to Lutz Frankenfeld, a Darwin based businessman who drove the car from Melbourne to Adelaide before transporting it to Darwin. Frankenfeld owned the car for almost 10 years. There are two period photos of the car on file taken at prestige car dealer Oxford Allenby Motors in Perth in the late 1980's, which would have been when Frankenfeld sold the car. At that time the odometer was c55,000 miles. Fast track to 2004 and the owner of this Lamborghini Jarama from 1975 to 1980 bought his old car back. Hed always regretted selling this car and after several years of looking, it turned up in Perth at the Motor Museum of Western Australia. The car had been in continuous ownership for 15 or so years. Its then owner passed away and his family had the car displayed at the Motor Museum of Western Australia. At that time the car was registered as 1BUF012 (WA). This car is well travelled and Ferruccio would have been well pleased that it has been used and enjoyed throughout its life. In 2009 the engine was rebuilt by Lamborghini specialist Paul Placzek from Sports & Classic Car Services in Melbourne. At that time the odometer was 97,957 miles. This is a well known car in Melbourne and it is often seen on various classic Italian car rallies and other events. It has averaged around 1,000 miles per annum since the engine was rebuilt and the odometer today reads 07993 (107,993) miles. The car has just been repainted in its original colour by classic and prestige car specialists Luxury Auto Body in Melbourne. As a result, the car presents today like new. We love the look of the Jarama in red which is beautifully contrasted by the subtle chrome work and black accents. The Miura style knock off wheels, which are a real feature of the Jarama and a preferred look to the bolt on wheels of the Jarama S, are in beautiful condition with no scrapes or wheel rash evident. All of the chrome, other external trim, lights/lenses and the glass are in very good condition. The cabin in a Jarama is arguably the most comfortable of all the classic Lamborghinis. Visibility is excellent and the seats are quite luxurious. The interior of this car is finished in its original black and it provides a lovely contrast to the red paint work. All of the leather is in excellent condition and there are no rips, tears or splits to any of the upholstery. The timber steering wheel and gear knob are a feature and both are in excellent condition on this car. All of the instruments and controls are in working order and the (upgraded) air conditioning even blows cold air. On a recent test drive, this car performed every bit as good as it looks. Like most big V12 Lamborghinis this Jarama needs plenty of fuel sucked into the carburettors to get the engine started. Once it fires the engine quickly settled into a smooth idle. This car has been upgraded with electronic ignition which has probably helped with the smoothness of its running, particularly when cold. What became immediately apparent was that this car was unfussed nudging in and around busy Melbourne traffic. The gearbox is smooth from cold and there is no need to be apprehensive selecting second gear. This car is fully sorted and an absolute joy to drive. It really finds its head once out on the motorway and put simply it just wants to go. A break in traffic opens up and the car just takes off. Lamborghinis 3929cc V12 is an absolute jewel and the engine in this car has loads of power on tap and it revs willingly through the rev range without any hesitation at all. The brakes are more than adequate and pullthe car up effortlessly in a straight line. The handling is balanced and the steering is direct. Interestingly, the feel is quite different to an Espada which has a slightly longer wheelbase. The Jarama was a favourite of Ferruccio Lamborghini. To quote him from the January 1991 issue of Thoroughbred & Classic Cars . . . I preferred the Jarama to all the others, because it is the perfect compromise between the Miura and the Espada. The Miura is a sports car for the young at heart who wants to go like hell and love to be seen. Myself, I considered the Miura too extrovert after a while. In turn, the Espada was my Rolls Royce . . . still quite fast, but also large and comfortable. The Jarama is the perfect car if you just want to have one car. The Miura and Countach are the best known classic Lamborghinis, however, the front engine V12 cars have now developed strong interest from collectors and enthusiasts all over the world. The early 350 GT / 400 GT 2+2s and even the Islero have taken off in terms of price and the Jarama has slept quietly in their shadows. The secret is out, however, and the Jarama is now becoming sought after and prices are on the rise. Its best competitor from across town at Maranello would be the Ferrari 365 GTC/4 and the Jarama offers great value, is every bit as good to drive (if not better!) and it is a lot rarer compared to the C4. The car is confirmed as matching numbers. It has a correct spare wheel but no tool/jack kit. There are service receipts on file dating back to 2005, an original owners manual, an Espada/Jarama engine manual (copy), parts manual (copy), original sales brochures and other literature that will accompany the car. The owner has decided it is time to down size his collection. As noted above, this car has just been repainted and he has therefore decided it is probably the right time to sell. Highlights: - 1 of only 5 factory right hand drive Lamborghini Jaramas built. - A beautifully presented car that is absolutely fantastic to drive. - Recently repainted and only 10,000 miles since the engine was rebuilt. - A well known, well maintained car with a known history from new. Price - $329,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1108764
  • Body Type: Convertible
  • No. of Doors: Single-Seater

Bruce Leslie McLaren was born on the 30th August 1937 in Auckland, New Zealand. He was born with motor racing in his veins. From the young age of 14 he was racing cars and achieved great success at an early age. McLaren's talent was noted by none other than Jack Brabham, who was racing for Cooper back in the late 1950's. McLaren got a seat driving a Cooper T43 at the 1958 New Zealand Grand Prix where he performed exceptionally well before being forced to retire after completing 71 laps of the 75 lap race. He was selected as 'Driver to Europe' by NZIGP Association and headed to England in March 1958 to drive for John Cooper. Success came quickly for Bruce McLaren and he won the 1959 United States Grand Prix at age 22 years 104 days, becoming the youngest ever GP winner at that time. He then went on to win the first race of the 1960 Formula One season, the Argentine Grand Prix and he would finish runner up in the championship that year to Brabham. Whilst still racing for Cooper, he set up Bruce McLaren Motor Racing Ltd in 1963. McLaren left Cooper at the end of 1965 and announced his own Formula One racing team, with co-driver and fellow Kiwi Chris Amon. It was a tough few years as McLaren found its feet, however, the hard work eventually paid off and Bruce McLaren took his fourth career win, claiming victory in the 1968 Belgian Grand Prix at Spa in his McLaren-Ford. This was the team's first Grand Prix win. Another Kiwi, Denny Hulme, joined McLaren for the 1968 season and won twice in the McLaren-Ford that year with McLaren finishing second in the constructor's championship behind Lotus-Ford. In 1966 McLaren and co-driver Chris Amon won the controversial Le Mans 24 Hours in a Ford GT40. Bruce McLaren was a great driver, however, he was probably an even better constructor. McLaren loved the evolving and very popular Can-Am Series and achieved great success winning five consecutive championships from 1967 to 1971. McLaren himself won the championship in 1967 and 1969 with team mate Denny Hulme winning in 1968 and 1970. American, Peter Revson completed the quintuple winning the championship in 1971. Sadly, Bruce McLaren died on the 2nd June 1970 while testing a Can-Am car at Goodwood. Teddy Meyer took control of McLaren and the legacy lived on with McLaren becoming an even more dominant force in motor racing. McLaren decided to abandon Can-Am at the end of 1972 and focus solely on Formula One. When the original Can-Am series ceased at the end of 1974, McLaren was by far the most successful constructor, with an incredible 43 race wins. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1971 McLaren M8E Can-Am race car. In 1968 Bruce McLaren and his team developed the McLaren M8A for that years Can-Am season. It was an evolution of the M6A (which had won the championship in 1967) and had an all-aluminium 7 litre Chevrolet big block V8 engine. The engines were built by Gary Knutson and developed around 620hp. For the 1969 season the M8B was developed, it had a slightly upgraded engine which now developed 630 hp.. A partnership was created between Bruce McLaren Racing and the Racing Division of Trojan Limited to build the M8C, which was a customer version of the M8A,. Going forward Trojan would build all customer cars and Bruce McLaren Racing would build the works cars. The 1970 season saw the introduction of the M8D. The engine was enlarged to 6.7 litres and now produced 670 hp. For the 1971 season McLaren introduced another customer car, the M8E. It was based on the M8B and again built exclusively by Trojan Limited. The final works car was the M8F which was also introduced in 1971. It now had an 8 litre engine which produced 740 hp. The final customer car was the M8FP which was based on the M8F. Total Mclaren M8 production comprised of 2x M8As and 1x spare tub, 2x M8Bs and 1x spare tub, 10x M8Cs, 4x M8Ds, 11x M8Es (plus 2x unnumbered tubs) and 2x M8Fs. The McLaren M8E offered for sale is chassis number M8E-80-04. The car was purchased by Roy Woods of Roy Woods Racing Inc (US) to complete in the 1971 Can-Am season. The car was entered as part of the ARA American Racing Associates team bearing number 29. They missed out on the first two races but by round 3 at the Road Atlanta circuit, the car was ready to compete with Vic Elford the driver. Unfortunately, problems with the oil pressure and the clutch resulted in a DNF. Round 4 at Watkins Glen gave the team a far better result, the car qualified 16th and finished 8th. Round 5 at the Mid-Ohio circuit resulted in another DNF, however, this time it wasnt a problem with the car. Exhaustion forced Elford to retire the car. Round 6 at the Road of America circuit saw the car qualify in 5th place and finish the race in 3rd position. During the next round at Donnybrook Vic Elford almost repeated the result from the previous round. This time he qualified 6th and finished 4th. For reasons unknown, the car didnt participate in round 8. Round 9 took place at the famous Laguna Seca circuit. Unfortunately, disaster struck in the preceding practice on Thursday. Elford crashed the car, cannoning backwards at over 100mph into a bridge abutment. Fortunately, Elford suffered only minor injuries, but the tub was destroyed and unrepairable. Elford was given an M8D for the race. Roy Woods Racing ordered a new M8E tub and managed to get the car ready for the next round. At round 10 at the Riverside circuit Elford retained the M8D, so Sam Posey drove the M8E, qualifying 7th and finishing 4th. At the end of the season the car was sold to William Bill Cuddy. Cuddy entered the car into three rounds of the 1972 Can-Am season. Alan Johnson raced the car in round 4 at the Mid-Ohio circuit and Bill Cuddy raced the car in round 8 at Laguna Seca and in round 9 at Riverside. In 1973 Cuddy entered the car for only one race, being round 7 at Laguna Seca. After the 1973 season he sold the car to Dick Workman. Over the next few years, the car changed hands a few times. Workman sold it to Lynn Sinclair, who sold it to Merle Brennan who purchased the car for parts for his M8F, but soon discovered the parts were not interchangeable. He sold the car back to Workman minus the front and rear suspension. Dick Workman returned the car to race ready and competed in the 1977 Can-Am series. The car was entered as an M8L, the L possibly referring to the Lola uprights and suspension Workman had fitted to the car. In 1979 the car was sold to Chuck Haines from Can-Am Cars Ltd. He went on a journey to have the car restored to its original specification, which included painting the car in its original colour scheme of yellow with red livery, exactly as it was raced by Vic Elford in 1971. The majority of the work was done by the Symbolic Motor Car Company in San Diego, California. The car was invited to appear at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours dElegance which was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Can-Am. In 2011 the car was sold by Haines to an Australian enthusiast. There is an import approval on file dated 28th June 2011 and the car was subsequently imported here. The car was enjoyed for the next 8 years, which also included a return to Laguna Seca. The car was taken to The Monterey PreReunion and The Rolex Monterey Motorsport Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, California, USA in August 2016. The current owner acquired M8E-80-04 in 2019 and now wants to go in a different direction with his car collection. Today this McLaren M8E presents immaculately and is in race ready condition. Accompanying the car is a massive history file, including lots of period information and photographs. Importantly, the car has a CAMS log book and Certificate of Description (COD) which were issued on the 28th February 2012. The car was validated by Barry Lock, who worked for McLaren from 1967 to 1974 and again briefly in 1975. Barry was heavily involved with the McLaren M8Es and he was one of three McLaren employees who liaised with Trojan, who built the customer cars for McLaren. Barrys Survey Report issued in October 2019 is on file. There is a significant inventory of spare parts, including a spare engine, which can be purchased with the car. McLaren dominated Can-Am racing in the late 1960s and early 1970s and these cars are simply monsters of the track! With essentially no restrictions they were faster than Formula One cars in period. A car of this caliber is seldom offered for sale in Australia. A truly unique opportunity. Highlights: - Purchased new by Roy Woods to compete in the 1971 Can-Am Series. - Raced by Vic Elford with some success finishing 3rd in Round 6 and 4th in Round 7, but damaged in Round 9 of the 1971 Can-Am series and subsequently rebuilt. - Known and documented history passing through a number of owners until restored from 1987 - 1995. - Invited to appear at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. - Australian import approval on file dated 28 June 2011. - CAMS historic log book and COD issued 28th February 2012. - Campaigned at historic motorsports events in Australia 2012 - 2016. - Taken to The Monterey PreReunion and The Rolex Monterey Motorsport Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, California, USA in August 2016. - Sold to the current owner in May 2019. - Car validated by Barry Lock, who worked for McLaren from 1967 to 1974 and again briefly in 1975. Barrys Survey Report issued in October 2019 is on file. There are some fabulous videos of the car online. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlfiT4MRFnM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17-lKnaGbPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_hKUjxYZxI Price $699,950

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1092117
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 2,675

Citroen is one of the worlds most iconic and innovative automobile manufacturers. Founded by André-Gustave Citroen in 1919, the company produced its first motor vehicle, the Citroen Type A, immediately following the First World War. Prior to this and during the War, Citroen supported France by manufacturing armaments from its then modern factory. Throughout the War, Citroen realised that he had to plan for the future and decided he would start manufacturing motor vehicles once peace returned to Europe. In the early years Citroens plans were to bring mass production to Europe using the principles developed by Henry Ford. In 1934 Citroen introduced the 7CV or Traction Avant which today is recognised as one of the most important automobiles ever built. The Traction Avant pioneered unitary body construction (with no separate chassis), four wheel independent suspension and front wheel drive. The early 1930s were tough times for Citroen and the company ultimately filed for bankruptcy in December 1934. Andre Citroen passed away in July 1935 after losing his battle with cancer at the relatively young age of 57. Michelin subsequently took over Citroen and the company went on to become a power house of French industry. The Citroen brand is synonymous with innovation, however, their cars were also well built and very reliable. Other key milestones in Citroens history were the introduction of the Deux Chevaux or 2CV in 1948 and the Goddess DS Series cars in 1955 (which featured a hydro pneumatic self-levelling suspension system, a high-pressure hydraulic system, disc brakes and later, swivelling headlights). What is often overlooked is that Citroen has a rich motorsport pedigree, particularly in rallying, where it has won many events and championships over the years, including the Paris-Dakar rally. Citroen always had a vision to build a sporting version of their iconic DS series cars. The missing piece of the puzzle was found following Citroens acquisition of Maserati in 1968. Citroen decided to use a Maserati engine to power their new sports saloon. The result was the Citroen SM, first shown at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1970. It went on sale in France in September of that year. Citroen only built left hand drive SMs, although right hand drive conversions were done in the UK and Australia. The SM was a success for Citroen with 12,920 examples built from 1970 through until 1975. The majority of the cars were built in 1971 and 1972. The oil crisis in 1973 and Citroens bankruptcy in 1974 ultimately led to the demise of the SM. Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a rare and unique Citroen SM. This particular car was built in May 1972 and it is understood to have been sold new in Canada. This Euro spec 6 headlight car has the SB chassis number prefix which designates the car has the 2.7 litre engine (with carburettors) and it has the desirable five speed manual gearbox. Interestingly, this combination offers far greater performance than the 3.0 litre engine with automatic gearbox. The car is finished in 'gris nacré' (AC095) with a black interior. Not much is known about the early days of its life in Canada. In 1986 the car was sold to Andrew Lonseth from Alberta and at that time an appraisal was done by Little Lot Appraisals in Edmonton, Alberta. The appraisal mentions the car had recently been repainted and the odometer was 75,253 km which was believed to be the actual mileage for the car. Photos on file from when the appraisal was done shows the car was glacier blue at that time. Lonseth owned the car for about 16 years. During that time, he moved from Canada to Bainbridge Island, Washington, USA and he took the car with him. The US title on file shows the car was registered as 400 GPL. Unfortunately, swivelling headlights are illegal in the US and it is understood they were disconnected at that time. In 2002 Lonseth sold the car to Mark McKibbin from Warrabul, Victoria, Australia. At that time the odometer was c98,000 km. Before the car was shipped to Australia it was given a major service, all the fluids were replaced and a new rotary air conditioning assembly was installed. This work was completed by Chris Middleton in Seattle. In 2010 the car was given a mechanical overhaul and the engine was rebuilt. At that time the mileage was around 100,000 miles. The job to rebuild the engine was given to Spyder Automobiles from Warragul in Victoria. The car changed hands in 2011/12 and headed to its new owner in Brisbane, Queensland. The car was regularly maintained throughout his ownership. A new clutch was installed in 2014 and a new gearbox was installed in 2018. The current owner purchased the car in 2018 and at that time the odometer read 110,256 km. During his ownership he has continued to improve the car. The interior was given a refresh, the carburettors where rebuilt and some cosmetic work undertaken. Today this car presents really well and it is just fabulous to drive. Driving a Citroen SM is a unique experience and this car certainly doesnt disappoint. Not surprisingly, the starting procedure for the SM is basically the same as the Maserati Merak. Turn the key to energise the fuel pumps and get fuel into the carburettors, pull out the choke, three pumps on the throttle and then turn the key. This SM starts easily from cold and soon settles into a smooth idle. The hydraulic system charges quickly and the car raises itself to the correct ride height. Its quirky, but very cool! Oldtimer Australia has had the pleasure to handle the sale of a number of Citroen SMs and this car is perhaps the best driving example weve had. As youd expect given the relatively recent rebuild, the engine feels strong and the manual gearbox is smooth. The suspension on these Citroens is unlike anything you will find on any other car. This car just glides along the road. The suspension absorbs just about anything theroad surface can throw up without any noticeable change in the ride. You can even drive over a speed bump without slowing down and hardly notice a change in the ride. One can only imagine what it would be like to ride a magic carpet . . . perhaps as smooth as driving a Citroen SM! The steering on a Citroen SM is another unique and interesting feature. All SMs have the DIRAVI system installed. DIRAVI stands for direction à rappel asservi which means steering with controlled return or more generally power steering with power assisted return. The advantages of the system are that an irregular road surface will not affect the steering, minimal physical exertion is required to turn the steering wheel, its very fast and it only takes two turns from lock to lock. The directness of the steering and the power assisted return do take a little bit of getting used to, as do the sensitive stop/go brakes. That said, you get the hang of it quickly and the self-centring steering is actually really good. After a few miles you think to yourself . . . I really get this car! The ride and drive on this car is difficult to fault. The V6 Maserati engine has enough power on tap to push you back in the seat under acceleration and the brakes are more than capable of pulling the car up quickly and ina straight line. The car has some creature comforts, including an air conditioning system that blows cold air and a brand new Alpine stereo with Bluetooth capability and a Kenwood subwoofer. The car presents well and medium grey (gris nacre) is a perfect colour for an SM. The paintwork on this car is in good condition for its age. There are few minor blemishes and stone chips here and there, consistent with a car that is used as its makers intended . . . and that is to be driven! The external trim is in good condition, though there is some very light pitting in some of the chrome and there is a nick in the front (rubber) bumper. The glass is crisp and clear though the front windscreen appears to have had a stone chip repair at some stage. The interior presents well, with the slightest amount of patina. The front seats, which were recently reupholstered, are firm and the leather is in excellent condition. The rear seats show some light wear, but there are no splits or tears. The carpets were also recently replaced and are in excellent condition. You will often see a cracked dash on a Citroen SM, however, the dash in this car is in very good condition. All instruments appear to be in good working order. Under the bonnet it is clean, neat and tidy. The boot, which was also recently recarpeted is in very good condition. There is a spare wheel and tool kit present. The car has all its ID tags in place, including the body number tag, chassis number tag and body paint code tag which reads AC095, confirming the car was originally painted in 'gris nacré'. Accompanying this car is a thick history file dating back to the mid 1980s (including an original Washington title), historical documentation and a factory owners manual. The car is really an engineering masterpiece. It looks like nothing else (except a Citroen!), it is technologically brilliant and is perhaps best described as a sporting Rolls-Royce. Driving an SM is a unique experience and owning one should be on everyones bucket list! Today the odometer reads 15,489 km. Highlights: - Desirable Euro spec version with 5 speed manual gearbox. - Well documented service history. - Hydraulic system is in good working order. - Almost $25,000 spent on the car by the current owner. - Well presented in a stunning colour combination. - Mechanically sorted and ready for its next owner to use and enjoy. Price $99,950.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1109171
  • Body Type: Hardtop - Coupe
  • No. of Doors: 2

1968 Fiat 500 F (with126 652cc engine & full synchro gearbox)

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1040073
  • Body Type: Roadster
  • No. of Doors: 2
  • Capacity - cc: 3,781

Oldtimer Australia is delighted to offer for sale a 1964 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight.

CALL 07 3171 1953
  • RefCode: TA1115845
  • Body Type: Sedan
  • No. of Doors: 4

2017 HSV 30th Anniversary Senator Signature Build #001 BRAND NEW Car

CALL 07 3171 1953
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