Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Review

By: Peter McKay

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Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo
Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo
Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo
Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo

Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo. Quick but not hard core performance says Peter McKay.

Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo Review
Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo

 

Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo

(Nov 2012) Don't expect hardcore performance from the new Hyundai Veloster SR Turbo. It's not a wild-child rival for the likes of the Renaultsport Megane 265 or the Subaru WRX (or even the VW Golf GTI or Mini Cooper S), and nor is Hyundai suggesting this is its role.

The SR Turbo is being positioned as stylish hatch with a host of desirable accoutrements, along with pleasing driveability and lively, if subtle, extra pace.The new SR Turbo offers the response and capability the lazy, naturally-aspirated version should have been gifted with.

A twin-scroll turbocharger and direct injection has lifted the 1.6-litre Veloster's outputs to a generous 150kW/265Nm, increases of 46 and 60 percent respectively. The turbo urge is evident from down low but really cranks up around 3500rpm, though always in a manageable way.

In a minor miracle of engineering, owners won't be paying more at the pump for added the herbs and spices as the official fuel economy stays at an economical 6.8L/100km for the manual, mainly due to the SR's lazy, easy progress in taller gears.

The SR Turbo gets the same MacPherson strut front and torsion beam rear as the standard Veloster, but Sachs gas dampers front and rear sharpen up the response and control, in conjunction with speed-sensitive Motor Driven Power Steering (MDPS) - unique to the SR Turbo - and a quicker steering rack (2.78 turns lock-to-lock).

Really, though, the suspension tune is road-orientated and Hyundai has also been talking of recent local suspension work that allows the Veloster to make more comfortable progress over Australia's crap roads. A couple of sharp bumps were registered during our drive, but generally the ride/handling on 18s is impressive.

Other engineering changes are the slightly bigger brakes and the optional auto transmission. Hyundai, which does its own gearboxes, had to put aside the twin-clutch 'box from the regular Veloster and dropped in a tougher, conventional six-speed auto capable of coping with the extra torque and snap of the turbo. To compensate for the loss of sportiness, the auto (two grand extra) comes with steering-wheel paddles.

Visually, the Veloster SR Turbo scores a sensibly blended rear spoiler and a couple of commanding exhaust pipes. There are special sports seats, a panoramic sunroof, 7.0-inch touch screen with sat-nav, leather/leatherette seat trim, rear parking camera, cruise control, alloys, must-have Bluetooth with streaming, and auto air-con. Trendy matte paintwork is a $1000 option. Six airbags, ESP, and ABS help the SR Turbo to a five-star ANCAP rating.

The base Veloster gave genuine emphasis to affordable chic and its force-fed sibling, at $31,990, presents as a loaded, good-value hatch-of-sorts. Not hot, but simmering.

 

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