2010 Porsche Boxster Spyder Review

By: Nathan Ponchard

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Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive
Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive Porsche Spyder is the lightest Porsche available, and one of the best to drive
Spyder cabin gets RS-type door straps, no door bins, fixed-back seats Spyder cabin gets RS-type door straps, no door bins, fixed-back seats Spyder cabin gets RS-type door straps, no door bins, fixed-back seats
Porsche boxter spyder 1 Porsche boxter spyder 1

Porsche channels its legendary 550 by cutting weight and kit for its Boxster Spyder

 

2010 Porsche Boxster Spyder

Less is more" is such a great credo to live by. Lose the credit cards, clear the clutter, trim the waistline, jettison the negativity. Freeing yourself of mobiles, iPods and big tellys would be easier said than done, though, so when you put all this in a car context, it’s probably not surprising that BMT-06X – Porsche Australia’s Boxster Spyder press car – still has touch-screen satellite navigation, digital climate control and a pretty decent stereo. And all this in a no-compromise ‘lightweight’ special...

In order to de-pork the Boxster S (by 80kg) to create the lightened, range-topping Spyder variant, Porsche has left out plenty of gear. Gone are the in-dash cupholders and the nifty door bins that usually reside beneath padded armrests, as well as the padding itself.

The door pulls are red cloth straps, ala GT3 and GT2 RS models, the seats are 12kg-lighter fixed-back carbonfibre buckets, and the electric folding roof mechanism has been left on the factory shelf – replaced by a two-piece manual system that is fiddly to operate if you’re on your own, but child’s play in comparison to some Lotus attempts.

The roof itself also has no lining, meaning a fair bit of cabin noise, but considering the Spyder is defined by the twin ‘speedster’ humps that serve as boot and engine cover, top-off is what this tweaked, trimmed and tuned Boxster is all about. And all the better to hear its glorious direct-injection flat-six wail.

The Spyder has just 7kW and 10Nm more than a Boxster S, but max power hits 800 revs higher, and with 80kg less mass, this is one seriously rapid Porsche. Throttle response is crisper, there’s a bit more acoustic edge, and when optioned with the seven-speed PDK and Sports Chrono pack (meaning launch control), the Boxster Spyder will actually beat Porsche’s 4.8sec 0-100km/h claim.

Dynamically, it’s also brilliant, as you’d expect. It sits lower than a Boxster S, with firmer fixed-rate dampers, stiffer and shorter springs, and thicker sway bars. There’s more negative camber up front, quicker-ratio steering and lighter 19-inch wheels weighing less than 10kg apiece. This car sets a new standard for roadster steering and handling, and leaves an even bigger gap between it and everything else without a roof.

But, as an everyday prospect, the Spyder loses its appeal. The seats make your back ache after a few hours and the armrests do a similar thing to your elbows. The low-riding roof looks like a mini marquee made from a tarp, and ultimately it’s a pain to put up and down. But if you could order a regular Boxster S with the Spyder’s engine, chassis, retro decals and lightweight wheels, that would be a car.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

Porsche Boxster Spyder

ENGINE 3436cc flat 6, DOHC, 24v
POWER 235kW @ 7200rpm
TORQUE 370Nm @ 4750rpm
WEIGHT 1300kg
TRANSMISSION 7-speed dual-clutch
0-100km/h 4.8sec (claimed)
TOP SPEED 265km/h (claimed)
PRICE $150,500

 

 

 

 

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