1967 Fairlane Ranchero: Reader ride

By: Peter Bout, Photography by: Peter Bout

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Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero
Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero
Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero

Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero

1967 Fairlane Ranchero: Reader ride
Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero

 

Peter Bouts' 1967 Ford Fairlane Ranchero

I’ve always been a ute person and I originally bought a ’64 Ranchero in Las Vegas when I was on holidays in 2008. It was born in the same year I was and it’s a great ute with a 289ci and column auto. I like column autos, they’re nice and simple and there’s nothing in the way on the floor. But it got hit in the door in a prang and it was going to take a while to find new doors and guards, so I decided to look for another Ranchero, as it was going to be quicker to buy another car and freight it out here.

I found my ’67 online in the US – it was an eBay tragedy – and I bought it sight unseen for US$4000 from a bloke called Juan Corona and, of course, it wasn’t as good as the photos made it out to be. It’s had a hard life. These cars are actually quite hard to buy because Ford only did a Fairlane version of the Ranchero in ’67, with the Fairlane nose and interior. They were foreman’s cars; workers got F100s and foremen drove Rancheros and El Caminos.

When it got here it wasn’t too bad apart from rusty doors and tailgate. I had the doors repaired by a guy at my shop (Pete’s Garage), who can hand-make anything in metal, but I had to buy a tailgate from Desert Valley Auto Parts in the US, which cost US$250 plus US$500 to get here and $1300 to panel beat and paint!

Apart from those repairs the body hasn’t been touched. I’ve changed all the suspension because it’s got a typical Falcon front end and all the bushes were gone. I put a set of four-piston Kelsey-Hayes discs on the front, Total Control front sway bar, King springs, Nolathane spring saddles, gas shocks, and did the ‘Shelby drop’ on the front end.

By lowering the [suspension] pivot point you lower the car by an inch; that makes them handle and it’s a lovely car to drive. I raised the rear and had the leaf springs reset harder. It has a C4 auto and an eight-inch diff and I changed the gearing to 3.5:1. I haven’t even changed the oil in the box.! And I put a set of Coys alloys and better tyres on it, which are the only real ‘modern’ touches.

This model did come out with a 390ci and even a GT version but mine has a 289ci V8 with a two-barrel Holley. I reckon it’s the second engine in the car. It’s pretty clean internally but I’m building a new 289 with an original 1965 Paxton supercharger which will have around 450hp at the flywheel. I think I’ll have to pay attention to the driveline when it goes in!

 

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