Ferrari Enzo - Toybox

By: Guy Allen, Photography by: Brad Misciewicz

Presented by

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Named after the marque's founder, this mid-engined V12 is now a rock-solid investment

For the rusted-on Ferrari fanatic there are a several ‘trophy‘ cars that would be essential for the wish-list collection, but only a couple from this century. This is one of them.

Clearly the model name alone – Enzo– might be enough, but really there was a lot more to the story of this car. When you’re building a missile named after the marque’s founder – effectively a ground-breaker for the new generation of ‘hyper cars’ – the last thing you want to do is come up with something that is half-baked. It needs to talk to the brand’s past and future, it needs to be visually stunning and of course it needs to be very, very fast. It’s fair to say the Enzo, launched in 2002, hit all the markers.

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Distinctive stylijng was informed by F1 thinking on aerodynamics

The mid-engined V12 was seen as the last of the primarily mechanical naturally-aspirated Ferraris, before electronic intervention took on a greater role in car design. That said, it did nevertheless have its fair share of electronic gadgets. Just 400 were to be built, offered first to existing Ferrari customers who had bought the F40 and F50.

Claiming 650hp (485kW), the 6.0lt powerplant drove through a six-speed automated sequential transmission that claimed lightning-quick changes (150 milliseconds), a 0-100km/h sprint of 3.14 seconds and a 0-161 (100mph) time of 6.6 sec. Top speed is 355km/h. In Ferrari-speak, the powerplant is an F140B, a 65-degree vee.

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Much of its performance relied on the comparatively subtle aero aids, such as the moveable flaps at the front of the car and dynamic rear wing along with a diffuser.

Ken Okuyama of Pininfarina lead the styling team for the car. His CV is impressive, including stints at Porsche – where he was involved in the 996 and Boxster projects – and at GMH. He went on to other Ferrari projects, such as the California.

Okuyama has since established his own design house, producing his own KO-branded low-batch-number cars.

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The aero equipment includes a dynamic rear spoiler and diffuser

Evo magazine summed up the Pininfarina effort this way: "The Enzo’s sharp detailing and Formula 1-derived aerodynamics informed the design to an extent unseen in previous Ferraris."

Back in 2002 it was listed at around Au$900,000 plus taxes – so over a mil – a huge sum at the time and enough to buy an inner city luxury home in most parts of the world. By the time production was finishing, two years later, they were already changing hands at a premium. The last car, number 400, was given to the Vatican to raise money for charity. It sold for US$1.1 million or Au$1.5 million at current exchange rates. That was 16 years ago.

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That V12 drives through a six-speed sequential transmission

Collectible Ferraris have done very well as investments across the intervening period, and the $4 million being asked for this one sits comfortably in the current market.

What makes this particular example compelling is it’s believed to be one of two in the country and one of the lower-mile examples you’ll find anywhere at around 2000km. Prestige Classics in Perth is the contact, on 0458 999 008.

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Enzo Ferrari

BODY 2-door mid-engine
ENGINE 6.0-litre 12-cylinder 65 degree
POWER & TORQUE 485kW @7800rpm, 650Nm @5500rpm
PERFORMANCE 0-100km/h – 3.1sec
TOP SPEED 355km/h
TRANSMISSION 6-speed sequential automated
DRIVE SYSTEM 2WD rear
PRICE $4 million
WHERE prestigeclassics.com.au

 

From Unique Cars #448, January 2021

 

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